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Emily Harris

OPINION
January 26, 2002
"Make Third Strikes Matter" (editorial, Jan. 22) notes correctly that proponents believe that this law has caused crime to go down in California. The problem with this conclusion is simply that there is no evidence that this legislation has had any impact on crime, in California or elsewhere. Research has shown that states without such laws on the books have experienced a drop in crime. More important, all over the country, those sentenced to prison for the most serious crimes have, in most cases, decreased, while those sentenced for drug crimes have skyrocketed, accounting for at least one-third of the increase in prison sentences during the past couple of decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS
The judge in the trial of former radical Sara Jane Olson set a hearing Tuesday to hear arguments that he should allow the videotaped testimony of a defense witness dying of cancer in Oregon. Defense attorney Susan B. Jordan claims that Jack Scott, 57, will contradict key details of Olson's alleged involvement with the Symbionese Liberation Army's 1970s crime rampage. Jordan said Scott's testimony needs to be recorded because he is terminally ill and may not live to testify in person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 indictment against Sara Jane Olson accuses her of plotting to plant pipe bombs under police cars, but a Los Angeles Superior Court judge said Monday that prosecutors can show jurors evidence of nearly two dozen other crimes--including two murders and a kidnapping. Judge James M. Ideman gave Deputy Dist. Attys. Eleanor Hunter and Michael Latin the green light to delve into details of 23 crimes attributed to the notorious Symbionese Liberation Army during its violent, 22-month campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst on Tuesday called a 1975 bank robbery that left a mother of four dead "a violent, senseless, evil act" committed by bloodthirsty revolutionaries. Hearst said she has no qualms about testifying against former members of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, which kidnapped her and with which she eventually participated in two bank robberies. "I don't have any skeletons in my closet," she said in an an appearance on CNN's "Larry King Live."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no forgetting her name or the waxen face--beret on head, carbine in hand. Patty Hearst, the abducted newspaper heiress turned gun-toting terrorist, remains a dark emblem of a revolutionary era. Now she's being pulled back to that time and called upon to revisit its horrors. Hearst is the prosecution's presumptive star witness in a case against four old comrades in arms, members of a violent anti-establishment band who called themselves the Symbionese Liberation Army.
OPINION
January 20, 2002
Re "A Son Has Been Waiting 26 Years for Justice," Jan. 17: Columnist Steve Lopez and Jon Opsahl have it wrong. It is not the function of the justice system to provide therapy or vengeance to Jon Opsahl or even to focus on his slain mother, Myrna Opsahl. That is the function of the civil courts. The job of the criminal justice system is to keep our society safe. I defy anyone to tell me how our society is any safer if Sara Jane Olson, Bill Harris, Emily Harris (Montague) or Michael Bortin are put in prison for the rest of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a group of 1970s radicals accused of killing a suburban homemaker a quarter-century ago continued their push Friday to undercut the government's star witness--newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw. As a Nov. 12 preliminary hearing was set for the four former Symbionese Liberation Army members charged with the shotgun murder of Myrna Opsahl, 42, defense attorneys said the upcoming trial would hinge on Hearst's believability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2002 | STEVE LOPEZ
Five weeks ago, I wrote a column telling Sara Jane Olson to spare us the tiresome woe-is-me act regarding her days and nights with the Symbionese Liberation Army. If she wanted the court's mercy for trying to blow up police cars in L.A., I said, Olson ought to spill the beans on who gunned down an innocent woman in 1975 during a Carmichael bank robbery. The day the column appeared, I got this message: "Thanks for refocusing the issue on my mom's unresolved murder by the SLA."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1985 | PATRICIA LOPEZ, Times Staff Writer
Amid the battered black-and-white police cars and aging Jeeps, a faded red 1970 Volkswagen van--its moment of glory past--awaited its turn on the auction block Saturday as Inglewood police sold off surplus vehicles. Few in the crowd knew of the van's infamous past until the auctioneer told them. "Around here, we call it the Patty Hearst van," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2002 | Peter H. King
SACRAMENTO In its issue dated Feb. 4, 1974--interestingly enough, the very date of Patty Hearst's abduction from her Berkeley apartment by members of the Symbionese Liberation Army--Time magazine reported a bulletin from the culture front. The notorious "Generation Gap" of the 1960s had gone missing. The magazine cited an academic study in which 1,000 American high school students and their parents were surveyed, first in 1965 and again eight years later. In the 1960s, responses had split sharply along generational lines.
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