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Emily Rosa

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998
Re "4th-Grader's Study Rebuts Touch Therapy," April 1: As a professional magician (and therefore, a deceptionist), no one could be more skeptical than I regarding the validity of "touch therapy." But even touch therapists do not claim 100% results. Isn't it just possible that, given her testing methods, all Emily Rosa proved is that she does not emit a detectable "energy field"? Or that a detectable, and therefore treatable, energy field is emitted only when in need of healing? A more reliable test--perhaps the next step--would have clinician Rosa merely recording the results of a blind test in which the therapist interacts with several random patients, some healthy, some ill. TOM OGDEN Hollywood Rosa, an 11-year-old girl, disproved in a science project the claims of those who wave their hands over sick people and heal them by altering "the energy field."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998
Re "4th-Grader's Study Rebuts Touch Therapy," April 1: As a professional magician (and therefore, a deceptionist), no one could be more skeptical than I regarding the validity of "touch therapy." But even touch therapists do not claim 100% results. Isn't it just possible that, given her testing methods, all Emily Rosa proved is that she does not emit a detectable "energy field"? Or that a detectable, and therefore treatable, energy field is emitted only when in need of healing? A more reliable test--perhaps the next step--would have clinician Rosa merely recording the results of a blind test in which the therapist interacts with several random patients, some healthy, some ill. TOM OGDEN Hollywood Rosa, an 11-year-old girl, disproved in a science project the claims of those who wave their hands over sick people and heal them by altering "the energy field."
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NEWS
April 1, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Using little more than a towel and a piece of cardboard, a 9-year-old girl conducted a "brilliant" study debunking therapeutic touch, an increasingly popular alternative treatment practiced by about 40,000 nurses and caregivers in the United States. Along the way, Emily Rosa, now 11, has apparently become the youngest researcher to publish a scientific paper in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Using little more than a towel and a piece of cardboard, a 9-year-old girl conducted a "brilliant" study debunking therapeutic touch, an increasingly popular alternative treatment practiced by about 40,000 nurses and caregivers in the United States. Along the way, Emily Rosa, now 11, has apparently become the youngest researcher to publish a scientific paper in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1998
Emily Rosa, 11, has shown what a girl can achieve in science with a little encouragement. When she was in the fourth grade, the Loveland, Colo., resident conducted a science project that experts describe as brilliant in debunking the controversial alternative medical treatment of therapeutic touch. Her achievement, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is an example for other girls, who too often abandon interest in science and math as they approach puberty.
NEWS
April 6, 1998
Norman, Is That You?: Hollywood is planning a remake of the classic film "Psycho." "In the new version, after Norman Bates slashes his victims, Johnnie Cochran gets him off the charge." (Premiere Radio) Paulagate: "With the Paula Jones case thrown out of court, President Clinton may be the luckiest man who ever lived. If he'd been on the Titanic, the iceberg would have sunk." (Argus Hamilton) Paula II: Some say this will weaken Kenneth Starr's case.
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