Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmily Thompson
IN THE NEWS

Emily Thompson

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Most of us probably think of the acoustical tile as a humble artifact from Home Depot. But not so Emily Thompson. To the UC San Diego history professor, it is an icon of modern civilization, belonging on a pedestal along with Cubist art, Einsteinian physics and James Joyce's "Ulysses." Introduced just before World War I, the sound-absorbing tile represents humanity's new ability to manipulate the built environment and avoid the sonic assaults of other modern inventions, Thompson says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Most of us probably think of the acoustical tile as a humble artifact from Home Depot. But not so Emily Thompson. To the UC San Diego history professor, it is an icon of modern civilization, belonging on a pedestal along with Cubist art, Einsteinian physics and James Joyce's "Ulysses." Introduced just before World War I, the sound-absorbing tile represents humanity's new ability to manipulate the built environment and avoid the sonic assaults of other modern inventions, Thompson says.
Advertisement
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Leon Botstein, Leon Botstein is the president of Bard College and the music director of the American Symphony Orchestra and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra.
ALL reports indicate that Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall, designed with the acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota, sounds fantastic. It is an acoustical success, perhaps the finest symphony hall built in modern times. From the point of view of concert hall acoustics, Gehry and Toyota triumphed earlier this year with the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Leon Botstein, Leon Botstein is the president of Bard College and the music director of the American Symphony Orchestra and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra.
ALL reports indicate that Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall, designed with the acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota, sounds fantastic. It is an acoustical success, perhaps the finest symphony hall built in modern times. From the point of view of concert hall acoustics, Gehry and Toyota triumphed earlier this year with the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2000 | Deepa Bharath, (714) 520-2513
The Docent Guild of the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace has announced the recipients of $250 scholarships awarded this year for outstanding academic performance and extracurricular achievement.
FOOD
May 29, 2002 | DAVID KARP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new Chinatown farmers market, though small in size, draws a lively crowd even before the official opening bell. Last week, it was filled with shoppers from local retirees to Silver Lake hipsters to chefs looking for fresh produce. The market doesn't specialize in Asian vegetables, but you can find a few like Chinese celery, bitter melon and Japanese cucumbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Even as the country went through the prosperity of the Roaring '20s followed by the economic woes of the 1930s and on into the outbreak of World War II, Hollywood too went through its own upheavals and transitions during those years -- including the rise of the studios and their power-wielding moguls, the golden era of silent movies and the introduction of sound to motion pictures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2002 | Kristina Sauerwein, Times Staff Writer
County prosecutors are recommending that film star Winona Ryder do 60 days of community service, undergo drug and psychiatric counseling, and pay more than $26,000 in fines and restitution as a result of her conviction for shoplifting from Saks Fifth Avenue. Ryder, who had faced a possible three-year prison term, is due to be sentenced Friday in a Beverly Hills courtroom for felony grand theft and vandalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2002 | Kristina Sauerwein and Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Jules Mark Lusman, whose medical license was revoked last week for prescribing addictive drugs to celebrities, frequently provided narcotics on a "cash-and-carry" basis to the rich and famous, including Winona Ryder and singer-actress Courtney Love, according to a state report. Lusman, 49, may face criminal prosecution, authorities said Monday. In its report, the Medical Board of California said the Santa Monica physician's stated specialty was laser surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
It's a testament to writer-director Jim Hemphill's enjoyably chatty script and to the hand-in-glove performances of his charismatic leads that "The Trouble With the Truth," a movie that's largely just one long, real-time conversation between two people, proves such an alive and involving film. Despite taking place in only a few indoor locations - and without an excess of movement within those spots - Hemphill deftly manages to avoid the kind of static staginess often associated with this sort of chamber piece.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2009 | Harriet Ryan and Kimi Yoshino
For those who live in the tabloid cross hairs, the fake name is essential. Privacy-seeking celebrities have standard pseudonyms for checking into hotels, booking spa appointments, reserving restaurant tables, advertising for help and setting up visits to the doctor's office. But when those attempts at anonymity make their way beyond the exam room door and onto a prescription pad, a Hollywood convenience becomes a crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2002 | Kristina Sauerwein, Times Staff Writer
Warning "if you steal again, you will go to jail," a Los Angeles County judge on Friday sentenced film star Winona Ryder to three years' probation, mental health counseling and 480 hours of community service for shoplifting designer merchandise from Saks Fifth Avenue in Beverly Hills. "You have disappointed many people inspired and entertained by your talents," Superior Court Judge Elden S. Fox told the two-time Oscar nominee, who nodded sheepishly as he spoke sternly.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|