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December 16, 2004
Regarding the suit by automakers to block California's greenhouse gas emission limits on cars (Dec. 8), the state in part invited the suit by not being more creative in designing its regulations. The issue is whether the regulations are backdoor fuel-economy standards, the type that are supposed to be a federal responsibility. The state could have neutralized this argument by allowing automakers to offset the required fleet emission reductions with reductions in other sectors in California, such as electric utilities.
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NATIONAL
December 8, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On election night, President Obama uttered a phrase that thrilled environmentalists. "We want our children to live in an America that isn't burdened by debt, that isn't weakened by inequality," Obama said, "that isn't threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. " Environmental optimists run the risk, however, of ending up like a kid who expected a puppy for Christmas and got socks instead. Those in industry who think that Obama's frequent campaign talk about the benefits of oil and gas could mean opening more land to drilling may also be disappointed.
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NATIONAL
December 8, 2009 | By Christi Parsons and Jim Tankersley
The Obama administration on Monday declared that greenhouse gases produced by vehicles, power plants and factories were a danger to public health, clearing the way for broad federal limits on climate-warming emissions. The announcement by the Environmental Protection Agency is a key step in a legal process that would allow the agency to act, without Congress, to develop tough rules to control emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases that scientists blame for global warming. "The vast body of evidence not only remains unassailable, it's grown stronger, and it points to one conclusion," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson in announcing the decision.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Considering President Obama has long championed the environment, it might have been a surprise that he signed a bill last week to protect U.S. airlines from complying with a European emissions-cutting effort. The European Union plan calls for fines on international airlines that exceed emission limits when flying in and out of Europe. The U.S. airline industry, which has loudly opposed the plan, cheered Obama's support for legislation to protect them from paying the fines. Environmentalists were not so happy.
WORLD
December 19, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
An international climate summit officially ended here today with an agreement among the world's largest economies to take steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions, no formal consensus from the 193 nations present, and major questions over what comes next in the global negotiating process. Conference attendees merely acknowledged -- and did not vote to adopt -- the so-called Copenhagen Accord, which stemmed from an eleventh-hour deal cut Friday evening between President Obama and leaders of four fast-growing nations.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Considering President Obama has long championed the environment, it might have been a surprise that he signed a bill last week to protect U.S. airlines from complying with a European emissions-cutting effort. The European Union plan calls for fines on international airlines that exceed emission limits when flying in and out of Europe. The U.S. airline industry, which has loudly opposed the plan, cheered Obama's support for legislation to protect them from paying the fines. Environmentalists were not so happy.
WORLD
December 12, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
From the legions of environmental Cassandras gathered here for international climate negotiations, an unlikely batch of advocates has emerged to champion a new global warming agreement: businesspeople. Corporate leaders, the rarest of commodities at the first climate talks nearly two decades ago, have staked a claim to the title of biggest player in Copenhagen aside from the official negotiators. They have blanketed the host Bella Center with company logos and glossy brochures touting business efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
Key concessions from the United States and China jolted climate negotiations Thursday in Copenhagen, providing optimism a day before President Obama joins other world leaders seeking a new international agreement on controlling greenhouse gases. But success hinged on two issues that have vexed diplomats throughout the two-week summit: an agreement between America and China on how to ensure that fast-developing nations follow through with their pledges to limit emissions; and whether poor nations will accept smaller emission cuts than they would like from wealthy countries in exchange for hundreds of billions of dollars in financial assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1990
The South Coast Air Quality Management District says a Torrance foundry has violated a court order limiting its emissions of airborne lead particles. AQMD prosecutor Joseph Panasiti said two samples taken last week outside the Martin Brass Foundry at 2341 Jefferson St. show lead concentrations exceeding 4 micrograms per liter of air. The foundry is under a court injunction to keep its lead emissions below 3 micrograms per liter.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
Sprawling across about 9,000 acres of rolling farmland in southwestern Indiana is one of the world's biggest aluminum smelters, operated by Alcoa Inc. The maze of rectangular buildings and giant smokestacks consumes enough electricity to supply a city of 200,000 -- power generated by burning more than 2 million tons of coal a year. So it may be surprising that company executives are pushing Congress to pass a version of President Obama's plan for combating global warming.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Polar bears are skating on thin ice in Alaska these days: Warming temperatures have resulted in dramatic shrinkage of sea ice, leaving the bears with fewer ice floes on which to rest and hunt seals. But at least for the moment, the Endangered Species Act won't be used to control the greenhouse gas emissions that conservationists say are contributing to climate change and posing one of the biggest threats to the bears' survival. The Obama administration on Tuesday released a proposed rule that -- like an earlier version put forward under President  George W. Bush -- exempts operations outside the bears' normal territory from restrictions on activities.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Delta Air Lines, one of the nation's largest air carrier, has added a $3 surcharge on flights in and out of Europe in a move that seems intended to offset the cost of a new European emissions plan. Starting this year, the Europe will impose taxes on airlines that exceed strict emission limits when flying in and out of European countries. A trade group for the nation's airlines estimates that the emission plan will cost U.S. airlines more than $3 billion through 2020 A national airline trade groups had suggested last month that airlines might add surcharges to offset the cost of the emissions plan.
WORLD
December 19, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
An international climate summit officially ended here today with an agreement among the world's largest economies to take steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions, no formal consensus from the 193 nations present, and major questions over what comes next in the global negotiating process. Conference attendees merely acknowledged -- and did not vote to adopt -- the so-called Copenhagen Accord, which stemmed from an eleventh-hour deal cut Friday evening between President Obama and leaders of four fast-growing nations.
WORLD
December 19, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
Leaders of the world's largest economies agreed late Friday to an accord on steps to curb greenhouse gas emissions, a deal hailed by President Obama as an "unprecedented breakthrough" in international negotiations but denounced by critics as too weak to avert the harshest effects of global warming. The agreement is not legally binding. But it would set the first emission limits for emerging powers India and China, along with new reduction targets for the United States, which never adopted the commitments of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
Key concessions from the United States and China jolted climate negotiations Thursday in Copenhagen, providing optimism a day before President Obama joins other world leaders seeking a new international agreement on controlling greenhouse gases. But success hinged on two issues that have vexed diplomats throughout the two-week summit: an agreement between America and China on how to ensure that fast-developing nations follow through with their pledges to limit emissions; and whether poor nations will accept smaller emission cuts than they would like from wealthy countries in exchange for hundreds of billions of dollars in financial assistance.
WORLD
December 12, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
From the legions of environmental Cassandras gathered here for international climate negotiations, an unlikely batch of advocates has emerged to champion a new global warming agreement: businesspeople. Corporate leaders, the rarest of commodities at the first climate talks nearly two decades ago, have staked a claim to the title of biggest player in Copenhagen aside from the official negotiators. They have blanketed the host Bella Center with company logos and glossy brochures touting business efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Facing federal pressure because of a growing ozone problem, the state approved the first-ever statewide emission controls on the booming oil and gas industry. Members of the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission said the new rules would reduce emissions by 68% from tanks that collect the liquids and other byproducts. They will take effect in May 2008 if the Legislature approves them.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In 1965, a brand new Chevy Malibu, straight off the factory floor, spewed over half a ton of smog-forming exhaust into the air by the time it was driven 100,000 miles. Today, that same car model is so advanced that it puts out only about 100 pounds of pollution in its lifetime. But as clean as modern automobiles are, California officials have not yet ended their push to make them cleaner.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2009 | By Christi Parsons and Jim Tankersley
The Obama administration on Monday declared that greenhouse gases produced by vehicles, power plants and factories were a danger to public health, clearing the way for broad federal limits on climate-warming emissions. The announcement by the Environmental Protection Agency is a key step in a legal process that would allow the agency to act, without Congress, to develop tough rules to control emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases that scientists blame for global warming. "The vast body of evidence not only remains unassailable, it's grown stronger, and it points to one conclusion," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson in announcing the decision.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
The nation's largest business lobby wants to put the science of global warming on trial. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, trying to ward off potentially sweeping federal emissions regulations, is pushing the Environmental Protection Agency to hold a rare public hearing on the scientific evidence for man-made climate change. Chamber officials say it would be "the Scopes monkey trial of the 21st century" -- complete with witnesses, cross-examinations and a judge who would rule, essentially, on whether humans are warming the planet to dangerous effect.
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