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Emma Kate Croghan

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March 31, 1997 | JOHN CLARK, FOR THE TIMES
Emma-Kate Croghan is hung over, not from drink but from promoting her first feature film, "Love and Other Catastrophes." She's just flown to New York from London. Previously, she was home in Australia. Before that she was in Japan, Australia again and Sundance. Basically she's been junketing ever since the film's celebrated debut at Cannes last year. She's lost weight, which scarcely seems possible, given that she's waif-like to begin with.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1997 | JOHN CLARK, FOR THE TIMES
Emma-Kate Croghan is hung over, not from drink but from promoting her first feature film, "Love and Other Catastrophes." She's just flown to New York from London. Previously, she was home in Australia. Before that she was in Japan, Australia again and Sundance. Basically she's been junketing ever since the film's celebrated debut at Cannes last year. She's lost weight, which scarcely seems possible, given that she's waif-like to begin with.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
What is more lively, spirited and unexpected than a youth movie that actually feels youthful? Mostly they show up DOA, compromised by aging, out-of-touch filmmakers and a lack of talent--or both. "Love and Other Catastrophes," however, takes delight in beating the odds. Made for about $30,000 in 17 days by a gang of fresh, young Australians and directed by 23-year-old Emma-Kate Croghan, "Catastrophes" comes by its wacky charm naturally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
This city's celebrated film festival is usually like a hibernating bear, slow getting started and difficult to rouse from a season's protracted slumber. This year has been different. The gala opening night film, for instance, often has little more than French origins or major names to recommend it: Consider that Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani's "Diabolique" was a serious contender this time around.
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