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Emmet Wemple

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BUSINESS
March 24, 1985 | JESUS SANCHEZ
South Laguna landscape architect Frederick Lang wanted to have towering palms mark the perimeter of a Newport Beach hotel that was being built 10 years ago. "Tourists want palm trees," he said. But Lang was hamstrung by the Irvine Co.'s master plan for the area, which banned the use of palms. He settled for a clump of palms in an interior court in the hotel. The Irvine Co., however, has turned over a new leaf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1996
Services for landscape architect Emmet L. Wemple are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. Luke's of the Mountain Church, 2563 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta. Graveside services will follow in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale. Wemple, whose projects included the grounds of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu and the Getty Center now under construction in Brentwood, as well as several Southern California university campuses, died Wednesday in Los Angeles at age 65.
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NEWS
January 9, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Strolling along Hope Street in downtown's desolate South Park district, landscape architect Emmet Wemple envisions a tree-lined avenue populated with a host of urban strollers. Further down the road, where Hope meets 9th Street, construction crews are excavating holes for the foundations of the new Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emmet L. Wemple, internationally known Southern California landscape architect whose myriad projects included the grounds of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, UCLA and the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace, has died. He was 75. Wemple, who taught at USC from 1951 to 1988, died Wednesday in Los Angeles of complications after heart surgery. "Emmet Wemple was a genius," said Stephen D. Rountree, director of operations and planning for the J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1996
Services for landscape architect Emmet L. Wemple are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. Luke's of the Mountain Church, 2563 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta. Graveside services will follow in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale. Wemple, whose projects included the grounds of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu and the Getty Center now under construction in Brentwood, as well as several Southern California university campuses, died Wednesday in Los Angeles at age 65.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emmet L. Wemple, internationally known Southern California landscape architect whose myriad projects included the grounds of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, UCLA and the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace, has died. He was 75. Wemple, who taught at USC from 1951 to 1988, died Wednesday in Los Angeles of complications after heart surgery. "Emmet Wemple was a genius," said Stephen D. Rountree, director of operations and planning for the J.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, radios and other small items began to disappear from Emmet Wemple's offices near MacArthur Park. The thefts were a nuisance for the famed landscape architect, but not enough to chase him from the culturally diverse and centrally located Westlake district of his beloved city. The area was teeming with young artists, architects and designers attracted by its low-cost housing and funky studio spaces.
REAL ESTATE
September 8, 1991
Emmet L. Wemple, fellow of the American Society of Landscape and president of Emmet L. Wemple & Associates Landscape Architects, will serve on the 1992 Presidential Design Awards Achievement Jury in September in Washington D.C. He will review entries for federal project commissions in the Design Arts Program competition of the National Endowment for the Arts.
REAL ESTATE
June 1, 1986
The USC School of Architecture has established the Emmet L. Wemple Endowment for Landscape Architecture, honoring excellence in teaching as exemplified by Wemple, who has been a member of the USC architecture faculty since 1951.
REAL ESTATE
March 17, 1985
Ground was broken Thursday in Costa Mesa for The Courtyards, an $18-million downtown project that is first in the city's redevelopment district, involving as investors the city, through the Redevelopment Agency, and Pacific Savings Bank. The Courtyards, on 11 acres at 19th Street and Harbor Boulevard, will consist of eight one- and two-story buildings set among courtyards and graced with fountains, offering a total of 172,300 square feet of retail and office space.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, radios and other small items began to disappear from Emmet Wemple's offices near MacArthur Park. The thefts were a nuisance for the famed landscape architect, but not enough to chase him from the culturally diverse and centrally located Westlake district of his beloved city. The area was teeming with young artists, architects and designers attracted by its low-cost housing and funky studio spaces.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Strolling along Hope Street in downtown's desolate South Park district, landscape architect Emmet Wemple envisions a tree-lined avenue populated with a host of urban strollers. Further down the road, where Hope meets 9th Street, construction crews are excavating holes for the foundations of the new Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1985 | JESUS SANCHEZ
South Laguna landscape architect Frederick Lang wanted to have towering palms mark the perimeter of a Newport Beach hotel that was being built 10 years ago. "Tourists want palm trees," he said. But Lang was hamstrung by the Irvine Co.'s master plan for the area, which banned the use of palms. He settled for a clump of palms in an interior court in the hotel. The Irvine Co., however, has turned over a new leaf.
REAL ESTATE
December 14, 1986
Ground has been broken for the first phase of the $50-million expansion of the Motion Picture and Television Fund Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills. Originally built in 1941 and established as a charity for retirees of the entertainment industry, it remains the only industry-based total care retirement community in the country. Architect and planner for the expansion is Bobrow/Thomas & Associates; Karsten Consultants is the project management firm.
REAL ESTATE
January 13, 1985
Construction has begun on the first phase of Anaheim City Center, a $200-million project being developed by Meyer Investment Properties Inc. of La Habra and the Anaheim Redevelopment Agency. It will be the city's first major downtown commercial complex. Phase 1 consists of a $25-million, 11-story office building with about 188,000 gross square feet, and a four-level parking structure.
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