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Emotions

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NEWS
November 18, 1988 | LAURA WILKINSON, Associated Press
The tearful and tearless both cry on William Frey's shoulder. Among those seeking his help since he published "Crying: The Mystery of Tears" three years ago were a woman whose husband alternated bouts of tears and laughter, and a restaurateur whose cooks cried chopping onions. For the restaurant owner, the answer was easy and time-honored: Chop the onions under a mist of water. Other times, it's more complicated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Playwright Bekah Brunstetter is certainly an artful emotional manipulator, as evidenced in “Be a Good Little Widow,” now in its Los Angeles premiere at the NoHo Arts Center. Even though you may be keenly aware that your feelings are being slyly exploited, you just might reach for a hankie anyway. A simple premise suffices for Brunstetter's obvious but nonetheless effective comedy-drama. Up-and-coming corporate attorney Craig (Donovan Patton) is juggling the affections of two women -- his free-spirited new wife, Melody (Larisa Oleynik)
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BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | MARTIN BOOE
Four years ago, Egan L. Badart was a successful, hard-driving real estate agent. He lived with his family in a 6,000-square-foot home with a swimming pool and an acre of ground in Pasadena. He had assets totaling "a little over $2 million." Then calamity struck. A perforated, cancerous colon incapacitated Badart for more than two years. Inexorably, his business and investments slipped away. He lost it all. The cars, the house, the money--even his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Angel Jennings, Richard Winton and James Rainey
To the 96,000 residents of Compton, the little Cessna would have looked like scores of other small planes that flew over the city each day. But anyone paying close attention might have noticed the single-engine craft kept circling the city in a continuous loop. What they could not have known was that it packed unusual cargo - a bank of a dozen wide-angle industrial imaging cameras. They recorded low-resolution images of every corner of the 10.1-square-mile city. For nine days in early 2012, the small plane beamed the images to the local Sheriff's Department station, where deputies observed fender benders, necklace snatchings and a shooting.
OPINION
September 14, 2013
Often on Dec. 7, readers send letters scolding the paper for not including an acknowledgment of that date's significance: the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor. If emotions are stirred over that infamous day more than 70 years ago, imagine how raw wounds are 12 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. There weren't that many letters sent to us on the 9/11 anniversary this week; rather, what was notable about them was their visceral emotion, the palpable sadness and anger they conveyed.
HEALTH
February 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Erica Eihl speaks in a voice that her kindergartners can hear only if they are as quiet as the church mice in children's storybooks. And with a couple of squirrelly exceptions, they stay that quiet for 15 or 20 minutes - a near eternity - as Eihl guides them to use all their senses to consider a piece of apple, with directions such as, "Looking at the apple, look on the outside. Look on the inside.… Remember, keep it in your palm and just look at it. " When she asks for their input, she gets raised hands and comments such as: "It smells juicy and apple-y" and "I see little tiny white spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Emotions have been running high at screenings of the historical drama "Emperor. " The Japanese American coproduction, which opens Friday, revolves around the dilemma Gen. Douglas MacArthur faced as he tried to restore order in post-World War II Japan: Should the country's divine leader, Emperor Hirohito, stand trial and face certain death on war crimes charges? When the producers screened "Emperor" recently in Japan, producer Gary Foster said, many men were in tears as they left the theater.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The clenched-fist, hair-on-fire feeling you get when gripped by anger, the warm-all-over sensation of happiness, the bilious wave that gnaws at your throat with disgust: these are the cues the body sends up to ready the mind for what comes next: fighting, hugging or withdrawal. And they appear to vary little across cultures, says a new study, which draws a detailed map of emotions and the distinct bodily sensations that accompany them. The corporal topography of emotion is likely to have evolved over millions of generations, and even if the mind isn't listening, those somato-sensory cues make sense: with anger, fear or surprise, our heartbeat picks up in readiness for flight or fight, and so our chest feels tight.
HEALTH
September 5, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Simply mentioning words such as "wheeze" can activate the brains of asthma patients, researchers have discovered, shedding light on the emotional underpinnings of the disease. The study of six patients found that asthma patients have extra brain activity in an area called the anterior cingulate cortex, which is associated with emotional responses.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | Tina Susman and Alana Semuels
The cheers were louder, the runners more determined, the tears of joy and relief at the Boston Marathon finish line Monday more heartfelt than ever. And yes, the security was tighter. But on a brilliant spring day, the city brought to grief by terrorist bombings one year earlier sprinted back in the resolute style of the runners who tore through quiet suburbs and charming town squares to the finish line, where the roars grew deafening as Meb Keflezighi became the first American man to win the marathon since 1983.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2014
Mixed views on Charleston I'm glad Alice Short highlighted the most troubling aspect of visiting Charleston, S.C., in her cover article ["In a New Light," April 13]. What is on the surface one of America's finest historic towns was built and maintained by enslaved African Americans whose history is mostly hidden and unspoken, while the Confederate past is celebrated. The only thing that "saved" our stay in Charleston was Alphonso Brown's wonderful Gullah Tour ( www.gullahtours.com )
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
While Jon Hamm's "Mad Men" character Don Draper tends to bottle up his emotions, the actor Jon Hamm is very free with his -- so free he's helping "Sesame Street" explain a few emotions to its young audience.  With the help of the resident "Sesame Street" TV host, Murray, Hamm runs through "frustrated," "guilty" and "amazed. " Check it out in the video above. It's about time someone explained "amazed," honestly, given the word's frequency of use these days.  With "guilty," well, we're happy to see Hamm re-creating that one without the stereotypical celebrity mug shot accompaniment!
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
The Times is pleased to have Amy Purdy, who won a bronze medal in snowboardcross at the 2014 Paralympics , guest-blogging for us while she competes on "Dancing With the Stars" with pro partner Derek Hough. This week, Purdy talks about Week 5 of the competition, in an email Q&A. Judging entirely by the rehearsal footage they air on the show, this seemed to be your most frustrating week. What has been the hardest part of appearing on the show? The hardest part of appearing on the show has been when I've come upon times where my legs wouldn't allow me to do what I wanted to do, to move the way I wanted to, the way I felt like I should be able to.  That's frustrating, feeling like I could do it, if not for my legs.  That's something I felt more than ever this week, because the nature of the waltz forced me into positions that were very challenging.  But those feelings of frustration, which are feelings I have felt many times before in my life, are also the catalyst to getting creative and figuring out a way to do want I want to do, even when it appears that my prosthetics have reached their limits.  That's something that Derek has taken to very well throughout my time on the show, finding creative solutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Susan King
When growing up in Singapore, filmmaker Anthony Chen's family had a maid from the Philippines, a woman he and his two younger brothers called Aunt Terry. But the family had to downsize in 1997 due to the Asian financial crisis, which plummeted the stock market and caused massive unemployment. They had to let Aunt Terry go and she returned to her hometown province of Iloilo in the Philippines. In 2013, Chen's film "Ilo Ilo" based on his childhood experiences was the talk of the Cannes Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Ilo Ilo" is writer-director Anthony Chen's first film, but breathtaking intimacy in storytelling is already second nature to him. Winner of Cannes' prestigious Camera d'Or for best debut feature, it quietly demonstrates that in the right hands even the familiar stuff of everyday life can move us deeply. "Ilo Ilo" is inspired, like the similarly affecting "The Maid" from Chile's Sebastian Silva, by the filmmaker's experience being raised by a maid in his native Singapore because his middle-class parents had to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2006 | CHRISTINE N. ZIEMBA
Part electronic art project and part social science experiment, the website We Feel Fine (wefeelfine.org) harvests human feelings from inside the matrix -- Keanu notwithstanding -- collecting sentences that contain "I feel" or "I am feeling" from a number of popular blogs, including My Space, LiveJournal, Flickr and Google.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
Since before the Gulf War began, the armed services have been planning ways to help soldiers and families with the strains and pressures of their homecoming. Among potential problems: * Returning troops may have FANTASY EXPECTATIONS of what they'll find when they're finally reunited. * Wives who are MORE INDEPENDENT after handling things alone for months may be reluctant to give up the freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
An alternately delicate and brutal retelling of the memoir by former World War II British Army officer Eric Lomax, "The Railway Man" is an impressively crafted, skillfully acted, highly absorbing journey into a dark corner of world history. Colin Firth plays Lomax in 1980, more than 35 years after being tortured at a Japanese labor camp in Thailand. He learns that Takashi Nagase, the Japanese interpreter at the helm of that cruel, unforgettable punishment, is still alive. Lomax will eventually cross continents to confront his erstwhile captor and hopefully quell the post-traumatic stress disorder that has plagued the self-dubbed "railway enthusiast" for decades.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
Hillary Rodham Clinton's comment last week that women face a double standard in politics raised eyebrows. And then came former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden to prove her point. It happened in reference to Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who has been embroiled in a battle with the CIA over a Senate report that detailed the spy agency's actions in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. “If the Senate can declassify this report, we will be able to ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted,” Feinstein, who as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee has certainly been privy to the report's findings, said last month.
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