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BUSINESS
September 29, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's a new workplace wrinkle. Fluor Corp. has added a hot line that allows employees to access personal benefit information--things such as vacation time and pension benefits accrued--24 hours a day. While providing employees with greater access to data, the program is saving the company money too. Fluor says it expects to save $30,000 this year in its personnel department, which has been freed from answering a barrage of worker inquiries.
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BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Memorial Day unofficially launches thousands of summer vacations, but about a quarter of all Americans will not be paid while they soak up some rest and relaxation. A recent study said the United States is the only advanced economy that does not require paid vacation days or holidays. The report, released Friday by the Center for Economic and Policy Research, revisited a 2007 study that compared the U.S. with nearly two dozen other countries and also found it to be the only nation that does not require paid vacation or holidays.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1998 | AMY JOYCE, Amy Joyce writes for the Washington Post
The phone is ringing, bosses are hovering and the deadline is just about here. You can't prioritize, your muscles are tense, and all you can think about is how awful it all is. If only you could escape, maybe you could get it all together. Companies including Bethesda, Md.-based Acacia Life Insurance Co. and New York City's PT & Co. realized a need for mending the worker's soul, and both provide that escape in the form of a meditation room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel said Monday that she would seek an extra $175 million in savings from the city's budget by using such strategies as cutting the City Council's discretionary funds and changing the investment practices of its employee retirement systems. Appearing with several business leaders, Greuel said her budget plan would generate $60 million in savings per year by reducing the size of public employee health benefits and workers' compensation outlays by 10%. Another $40 million could be found, she said, by modifying the way the city's pension boards invest and cutting the amount they spend on consultants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999
Jack M. Stewart's Sept. 2 commentary, "Davis Must Rein In Antibusiness Efforts," sounded more like Chicken Little's cry that the sky is falling. What Stewart failed to point out in his antiworkers' compensation benefit increase diatribe was that workers' compensation benefits have not been raised in over 17 years for over half of the permanently partially disabled workers in this state. Since 1993, members of the employer community, including members of Stewart's California Manufacturers' Assn.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990
Lawrence W. Halpin has joined Employee Benefits America in Fountain Valley as president and chief operating officer. He had previously been executive vice president and chief operating officer of the Holden Group, a Los Angeles firm specializing in retirement-income programs. Earlier, he was in charge of Transamerica/Occidental's group life and health insurance operations. Employee Benefits is a subsidiary of Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Corp.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | Associated Press
A bankruptcy judge today authorized Federated Department Stores Inc. and Allied Stores Corp. to pay employees millions of dollars in benefits earned before the retailers sought protection from their creditors. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge J. Vincent Aug Jr. approved payments for health and disability insurance, for drug and alcohol abuse counseling, employee educational programs and for a company savings plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
Councilman David Sullivan charged last week that city employees have a "Rolls-Royce" benefit package and believes the City Council should review it before negotiations with employee unions start this spring. Sullivan said the city has "good employees," but, "I have a real problem when the employees' benefits so greatly exceed those of the taxpayers who have to pay for them." City employees pay nothing for their benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted Thursday to initiate major reforms in the system of contracting out government services to private firms, including a measure that would require the firms to provide health insurance to thousands of employees. The board voted 4 to 1 to order drafting of an ordinance mandating the reforms. Its action signals a possible shift away from the "privatization" trend previously embraced by the conservative majority that once controlled the board.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four powerful business groups, admitting that "we are losing the . . . battle to make available quality health care at reasonable cost" to workers, pleaded for help Monday from Congress. The urgent tone of the appeal marked a sharp reversal of business's traditional antipathy to government involvement in health-care issues.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
California labor officials have fined a Southern California hospital chain, Pacific Health Corp., more than $7 million for not paying employee wages and bouncing payroll checks. The company operates the Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Center, Tustin Hospital, Newport Specialty Hospital, Bellflower Medical Center and Anaheim General Hospital. All of the locations were cited except the Newport Beach facility. "Employers have an obligation to pay workers the wages they've earned," said Christine Baker, director of the California Department of Industrial Relations.
OPINION
March 14, 2013
Only in Los Angeles would a liberal Democrat who has campaigned time and again with strong labor support stand accused of being this city's version of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican who earned labor's undying enmity for ending collective bargaining rights in his state. And yet that's precisely the latest wrinkle in the Los Angeles mayor's race. As The Times reported Wednesday, Controller Wendy Greuel made her pitch for labor support in part by suggesting that her opponent in the May 21 runoff election, Councilman Eric Garcetti, violated collective bargaining rules when he supported a change in retirement benefits for city employees last year.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Hostess Brands Inc. will start selling off the rights to Twinkies, Ding Dongs and other baked brands after a federal bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved its plan for an “orderly wind-down.” The company will also start shrinking its employee head count to 3,200 workers from 18,500, the 82-year-old pastry maker said. Judge Robert Drain of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Southern District of New York gave Hostess the go-ahead to start fielding bidders for its assets, the company said.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky
November is one of the most important months for health benefits. And it's now more than half over. This month is a time of open enrollment, when many workers sign up for next year's health insurance. Deadlines are a big deal, and you don't want to miss one. But once you're set for 2013, experts say, shift your attention back to 2012 and those use-'em-or-lose-'em benefits awaiting you. "Anything employees can do to accelerate elective care at year end allows them to get the full benefit" of their health plans, says Mike Thompson of consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2012 | By Evan Halper and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO -- Even by the most ambitious forecasts, the plan Gov. Jerry Brown and fellow Democrats are championing to contain government worker pensions in California could leave state taxpayers awash in debt to public employees. The governor's plan, announced Tuesday, is unlikely to save cities on the brink of bankruptcy. The relief his proposal would provide to the strained state budget is modest. Analysts who study the issue say far more aggressive action - including reduction of benefits for hundreds of thousands of current employees left untouched by Brown's proposal - will be needed to get runaway retirement costs under control.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has long been known for taking care of its workforce and a new report shows that care continues after an employee's death. The Mountain View, Calif., company reportedly takes care of its employees' families by giving them half of their salary for 10 years after the death of a worker. As if that wasn't nice enough, the benefit also extends beyond salary. Google also gives their employees' spouses stock benefits. Beyond that, Google makes sure employees' children receive checks for $1,000 a month until they turn 19, or 23 if they are full-time students.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
A federal law intended to allow companies to create a uniform system of health benefits across the country may stand in the way of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's still-sketchy universal health plan. The 1974 law sought to help employers avoid a spate of conflicting state laws -- with different levels and types of worker benefits. Last week a federal appeals court cited the law when it invalidated a Maryland law aimed at making Wal-Mart Stores Inc. spend more on healthcare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerospace giant TRW Inc. launched one of its biggest satellite operations Monday--dedicating a new child-care facility touted as one of the largest employee day-care centers in the nation. With fanfare usually associated with the completion of one of the Redondo Beach firm's multimillion-dollar defense contracts, company officials formally dedicated the 17,000-square-foot center, which opened in late August and already has 181 infants, toddlers and preschoolers enrolled.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2012 | Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court's endorsement of the federal healthcare law this week could spur more employers across the nation to relinquish their long-standing role as chief healthcare buyer for their workers. This shift has already begun among some big employers shedding their role in providing retiree health benefits, and experts say the court's decision this week could eventually lead companies to pursue a similar approach with current workers. With the Affordable Care Act still on track to offer numerous new benefits, such as guaranteed coverage for all adults starting in 2014, some companies may want to stop providing health coverage and instead give workers money to buy their own. One of the more popular ideas being discussed is to give workers a lump sum, or defined contribution, and then let them use that money to buy their own individual health plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant and Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
STOCKTON - City managers in Southern California on Wednesday were casting a wary eye on Stockton, the latest city to head to bankruptcy court, but said they were working hard to avoid what one public policy analyst predicted would be a string of municipal failures. Facing spiraling labor costs and debt, the Stockton City Council decided late Tuesday night to seek protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and is expected to file with the court as early as Thursday. The council took additional action to reduce costs but still could not fill a $26-million budget deficit.
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