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Employee Misconduct

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
At least 16 Los Angeles police officers or recruits who joined the force in the last year may be on the job without proper background checks after a city screener allegedly signed off on hiring recruits without checking personal and employment references for disqualifying issues, officials said Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former employee of the Drug Enforcement Administration pleaded guilty Thursday to illegally profiting from his position by taking money from a DEA vendor that he managed, federal authorities said. Leopoldo B. Villanueva, 63, admitted that he received $13,500 from Redline Towing at the same time he was working for the DEA as a contracting officer in charge of negotiating and managing contracts with vendors.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s normally low-profile security efforts were thrust into the limelight Wednesday when a fired technician alleged he had been part of a large surveillance operation that spied on company workers, critics, vendors and consultants. The company defended its security practices. The world's largest retailer declined to comment on specific allegations made by 19-year veteran Bruce Gabbard to the Wall Street Journal in a report published Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | Michelle Quinn and Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writers
The state criminal case against former Hewlett-Packard Co. Chairwoman Patricia C. Dunn and three others -- involving a corporate spying scandal that led to congressional hearings and an enhanced state privacy law -- has ended with a whimper. Dunn was cleared of all charges Wednesday by Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Ray Cunningham.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
New Century Financial Corp. said Wednesday that it had received cease-and-desist orders from banking regulators in four states, claiming that some subsidiaries of the troubled sub-prime mortgage lender have violated state laws. Regulators from New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and New Jersey sent notices to the Irvine-based company on Tuesday, according to its filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2007 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
As parents at a South County Roman Catholic school have grown increasingly riled by the mysterious dismissals of two popular teachers, a church official said Tuesday that the allegations against the two men did not involve sexual conduct with a minor. Maria Rullo Schinderle, general counsel for the Diocese of Orange, declined to comment further about the dismissals of Eric Hansen and Gregory Rhodes, teachers at Santa Margarita Catholic High School.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Video game maker Activision Inc. said Thursday that investigators conducting an internal probe of stock option grants had recommended that 10 current and former executives and directors give up any related gains. The investigators found that four current or former executives were at least partly responsible for misdated grants, but the inquiry didn't determine whether there was any intentional wrongdoing by those executives, Santa Monica-based Activision said.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Four years after federal regulators first accused two former Gateway Inc. executives of manipulating earnings, a jury found the men liable for violating fraud and recordkeeping laws and making false statements, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday. The jury reached a decision Wednesday in the civil trial against former Chief Financial Officer John J. Todd and former Controller Robert D. Manza.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2007 | Walter Hamilton and Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writers
Wall Street executive Mitchel Guttenberg sat down with his friend Erik Franklin in Manhattan's famed Oyster Bar about five years ago to discuss repaying a $25,000 loan. But instead of cash, Guttenberg allegedly offered a currency that's far more valuable on Wall Street: inside information about dozens of stock analyst recommendations at his firm, financial services powerhouse UBS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2007 | Ashley Surdin, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power ran up a $97-million overtime bill over an 11-month period, with some money going to employees who did not show up for work, an internal audit has found. The study, ordered by the board that oversees the nation's largest municipal utility, also found that some employees reported both overtime and absences on the same days. The 2 million hours of overtime were incurred between March 2005 and February 2006.
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