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NATIONAL
June 12, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The nation's home healthcare aides are not entitled to minimum wages or overtime pay under federal law, even if they work for private employers, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 decision, which keeps in place a long-standing rule that denies minimum wages and overtime pay to those who provide "companionship services" at home, could trigger a move in Congress to amend the law.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Employers cannot be required to post a notice that tells their workers they have a right to join a union and bargain for better wages, a federal appeals court ruled in the latest setback for the National Labor Relations Board. The so-called poster rule would have required more than 6 million private employers to post a one-page notice in a prominent place. Labor leaders hoped it would help stem the long decline in union membership in the private sector. Only about 7% of private-sector employees belong to unions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1995 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County officials have begun an effort to protect their employees' rights during federal inquiries into whether the county Department of Health Services improperly sought disaster funds after the Northridge earthquake, according to memos obtained by The Times on Tuesday. One of the memos, by Principal Deputy County Counsel Karen A. Lichtenberg, pointedly tells workers in all county departments: "You may refuse to participate in an interview.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Wisconsin Republicans on Monday turned up the heat on Democratic state senators who fled to Illinois last week to block passage of a controversial bill that would eliminate collective bargaining for most public employee unions. Republican Gov. Scott Walker warned that if his proposal is not passed by Friday, the state could miss a chance to refinance bonds and save more than $100 million. To make up the gap, Walker said at an afternoon press conference, 1,500 state workers would have to be laid off. "For those 14 Senate Democrats, you've had your time," Walker said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video surveillance has become commonplace in many American workplaces, but now this type of electronic snooping has reached a new frontier: the employee bathroom. That little-known fact was discovered this week by chagrined workers at the Consolidated Freightways truck terminal in the Riverside County community of Mira Loma. Many of the terminal's 600 employees are furious after learning that their restroom visits may have been captured on video.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2006 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., which has been attacked over its pay and benefits, said Monday that it was raising starting wages at a third of its stores but capping the pay of veteran workers. The nation's largest private employer is rolling out an average pay increase of 6% for new hires at 1,200 Wal-Mart and Sam's Club warehouse stores nationwide, including some of its nearly 200 stores in California.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Oakland judge issued a preliminary injunction ordering AC Transit to delay tests and come back to court when it could prove its bus drivers were using drugs and causing accidents. Saying he had concerns about personal privacy, Alameda County Superior Court Judge Michael Ballachey harshly criticized what he called the government's infringement on an employee's privacy rights. Ballachey issued a preliminary injunction against drug testing at the request of the transit employees' union.
NEWS
December 24, 2000
Q: My employer recently sent out a letter with our paychecks claiming the right to search an employee's vehicle if it is on company property. Is this legal? --S.B., Irvine A: Yes. Especially after giving written notice to employees, employers have the right to search vehicles, toolboxes, briefcases, lunch boxes and backpacks that are brought onto company property. An employer may even require employees to empty their pockets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1995
Once again UC Irvine is involved in controversy ("Should E-Mail Be Private?" Nov. 12). An individual's e-mail privacy is certainly not unique to this university. But what is at issue here is the notion of trust. The comments made by [Terry] Colvin [a spokesman for the UC system] and [William] Parker [associate executive vice chancellor and director of academic computing] indicate to me a clear lack of trust in [Irene] Wechselberg [a UC Irvine librarian], or any university employee.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
American Airlines' Southern California supervisors are attempting to push older, better-paid female flight attendants into retirement by subjectively enforcing a 2-year-old company policy requiring weight checks for those returning from unpaid leaves, federal anti-discrimination attorneys claimed Monday. In a lawsuit filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., known for its strong stance against workers unionizing, on Thursday closed a tire and lube center in Canada where workers had voted to organize. A Wal-Mart spokesman said the five workers and one manager at the center were offered jobs at comparable Wal-Mart facilities or elsewhere in the store, which is in Gatineau and has more than 250 workers. The store itself will remain open. The United Food and Commercial Workers union called the closure an attack on Wal-Mart workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2008 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County has paid more than $4 million in the last two years to settle discrimination, harassment and wrongful-termination claims brought by county employees but has never publicly justified the settlements. County supervisors, saying that taxpayers deserved to know why they settle other lawsuits, last year voted to publicly disclose legal evaluations written by county lawyers for each case. But they allowed the attorneys to make an exception for employee-related settlements.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Although U.S. workers can invest money in a retirement fund sponsored by their employer, it is not clear whether they can sue to recover money lost because of mistakes by the fund's administrator. That issue came before the Supreme Court on Monday in a case that could shape the pension rights of 70 million employees.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
While Gap Inc.'s stores have been disappointing shoppers and investors, the factories making the retailer's clothes have been treating workers better, according to the company's latest assessment of its labor practices. The update released Thursday marked the third time the owner of the Gap, Old Navy and Banana Republic chains had publicly critiqued the conditions in overseas factories often derided as "sweatshops" because of abuses inflicted on employees.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In a setback for organized labor, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that states may bar public employee unions from using compulsory dues for political purposes unless individuals give their explicit approval. The 9-0 ruling opens the door for states to pass laws restricting use of union dues.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The nation's home healthcare aides are not entitled to minimum wages or overtime pay under federal law, even if they work for private employers, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 decision, which keeps in place a long-standing rule that denies minimum wages and overtime pay to those who provide "companionship services" at home, could trigger a move in Congress to amend the law.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
It's not a union, but some Wal-Mart workers say it might be the next best thing. Searching for a voice in their work lives, employees of some central Florida Wal-Mart stores have formed a group to collectively air complaints about what they claim is shoddy treatment by the retail giant. About 250 employees and former employees from 40 central Florida stores have joined the fledgling Wal-Mart Workers Assn.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state of New York filed suit Wednesday against Wal-Mart Stores, alleging that the retailer broke the law by enforcing a policy barring a married employee from dating a colleague who is not his or her spouse. The lawsuit is the first test of a recently enacted state law prohibiting companies from firing employees for activities that are legal and outside the workplace. The suit alleges that Wal-Mart fired Samuel H. Johnson and Laurel S. Allen from its Johnstown, N.Y.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2007 | From Times wire services
Nike Inc. said it would resume soccer-ball production in Pakistan after reaching an agreement with a vendor that was "committed to setting new standards for workers' rights." Silver Star Group must have full-time workers who are paid hourly wages and are eligible for healthcare and other benefits, Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike said. Nike said it halted production in Pakistan in November after its previous vendor, Saga Sports, violated company policy.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2007 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
At a Democratic presidential debate last month, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton described Wal-Mart, the world's largest retail company, as a "mixed blessing." She spoke from experience. From 1986 to 1992, Clinton was a member of its board of directors, carefully navigating through a spate of internal policy concerns that now weigh on Wal-Mart's corporate image. Former Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
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