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Employee Thefts

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BUSINESS
November 24, 1990 | From United Press International
Retailers looking to cut their theft losses would do well to leave the customers alone and keep a wary eye on their own employees, according to a new survey. Employee theft accounts for seven times more revenue loss for retailers than shoplifting, said the annual loss-prevention survey by Ernst & Young, released Friday. The survey, "An Ounce of Prevention," showed retailers reported $2.
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TRAVEL
May 22, 2011 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel Editor
Question: My husband and I recently traveled on KLM from LAX to Amsterdam. We used Transportation Security Administration-regulated locks on our suitcases, which we've done several times. When we arrived in Amsterdam, the locks were missing, and there was no note that the luggage had been searched. Nothing had been disturbed; it looked as though someone had merely removed the locks and kept them — theft, pure and simple. This is a small thing, but I find it quite upsetting that a TSA employee committed this petty crime.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE
One Arizona small-business owner is still stinging from being ripped off not once but twice by two different office managers. "It's sad to say, but you are better off taking the attitude that everyone you hire is a potential thief," said the business owner, who agreed to discuss his woes but was too embarrassed about his $36,000 loss to see his name in print.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A contract employee at a nuclear material cleanup site pleaded not guilty in Knoxville to charges that he stole classified equipment used in enriching uranium and sold it to an undercover FBI agent posing as an official for the French government. Roy Lynn Oakley, 65, of Roane County, was detained for questioning in January before surrendering to authorities on Thursday. None of the data made it out of the country or was transmitted to criminal or terrorist groups, the Justice Department said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | MARY GUTHRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by concerns that economic hard times, layoffs and declining worker loyalty may prompt more employees to steal, retailers and other businesses are stepping up efforts to curb worker theft. Private security firms said the biggest growth area in their industry is in keeping dishonest employees from helping themselves to computers, office equipment, supplies or merchandise. To nab workers, companies are trying everything from high-tech security systems to undercover agents.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1989 | Jane Applegate
John Mullin, president of Mullin Lumber Co. in Los Angeles, knew he was being ripped off, but he couldn't figure out how. "We didn't know if it was employee theft, customer theft or the mishandling of the books," recalled Mullin. He began questioning employees about the substantial losses. At first, he said, he believed their denials. But when the thefts continued, an exasperated Mullin finally called Ray Boyd, president of Boyd & Associates.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1993 | MARY GUTHRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by concerns that economic hard times, layoffs and declining worker loyalty may prompt more employees to steal, retailers and other businesses are stepping up efforts to curb worker theft. Private security firms said the biggest growth area in their industry is in keeping dishonest employees from helping themselves to computers, office equipment, supplies or merchandise. To nab workers, companies are trying everything from high-tech security systems to undercover agents.
NEWS
November 5, 1987
The House voted 254 to 158 to impose a sweeping ban on use of lie detector tests by most private employers. The House acted after rejecting a substitute bill, 242 to 169, that would have allowed private polygraph tests to continue under strict new federal guidelines. Supporters of the ban, approved and sent to the Senate after more than 10 hours of intense debate, charged that polygraph tests were unreliable and constituted a threat to guarantees against job discrimination.
NEWS
December 1, 1993 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One night in September, 1989, Sheriff's Sgt. Robert Sobel told his wife he was leaving their Westminster home to buy a pack of cigarettes. Instead, he drove straight toward the ocean, with $12,000 in stolen drug money and thoughts of suicide. Only hours earlier, the $100 bills were hidden in a roll-top desk, overlooked by investigators searching Sobel's house. Now, he was intent on ridding himself of the tainted cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995
The executive director of a Long Beach business association was arrested this week on charges of trying to sell stolen computer chips to their original owner, police said. Milo Manny Jones, 30, executive director of the Downtown Long Beach Associates, has been released on $10,000 bail and is scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday. He has been suspended as executive director.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
RICK Cooley spent two decades building his thriving Triton Chandelier Inc. manufacturing business. But when a banker called about a suspicious looking check one day, he knew something was amiss. Cooley's sweat equity was evaporating because of the actions of an employee who was forging his signature, shifting funds between different accounts and falsifying bank statements to cover her tracks.
WORLD
March 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A man stole $28 million worth of diamonds from an Antwerp, Belgium, bank where he had become a trusted trader with access to the vault, officials said. Prosecutors say the suspect broke into safe-deposit boxes in an ABM Amro bank last week. He took diamonds weighing 120,000 carats, police said. The suspect gave the name Carlos Hector Flomenbaum of Argentina, but authorities believe he was lying. A passport in that name was stolen in Israel a few years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A temporary worker who took data about an electronic voting company from a law firm's computers avoided jail time in a plea agreement with prosecutors. Stephen Mark Heller, 44, pleaded guilty Nov. 20 to unlawfully accessing a computer at the Jones Day law firm in Los Angeles. The firm represented voting machine manufacturer Diebold Inc. Heller took memos stating that Diebold might have broken laws. The memos were subsequently leaked to the media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2006 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
A federal lawsuit filed this week by an employee of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center alleges that managers there bought hundreds of high-end home improvement and personal items with hospital funds -- including brass and crystal faucet fixtures, chef-quality knives, stopwatches and a 94-gallon fish pond -- and that executives retaliated against him when he tried to expose the theft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor Gavin Newsom wants cable car crews to know he doesn't think all of them are lining their pockets with pilfered fares. The mayor met privately with union leaders and workers Friday to take some of the sting out of his comments earlier in the week that he was convinced some cable car operators were stealing money that should have gone into the public till. Those who went into the closed-door meeting hoping for a mea culpa were disappointed.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The man in charge of emptying parking meters in the town of Mount Kisco has been accused of stealing more than $30,000 in quarters. Jason Berke, 29, has been charged with grand larceny, said Westchester County Dist. Atty. Jeanine Pirro. Berke, who pleaded not guilty, faces seven years in prison if convicted. Pirro said that from April to December 2004, Berke would deposit coins once a week in change machines at grocery stores to get cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER
The Police Department has requested that the district attorney file criminal charges against four teachers with the Orange Unified School District for allegedly stealing shop tools and donated cars. The request, stemming from an investigation that began almost a year ago, involves three auto-shop teachers who allegedly failed to properly notify school authorities about vehicles donated to the district. Investigators are also checking into what became of the donated cars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, actress Sharon Stone would ask her housekeeper, Coco, where a pair of J.P. Tod shoes, a Luis Vuitton handbag or a Vera Wang evening gown might be. "The housekeeper would say, 'You gave that to your sister,' or, 'Oh, that's at the cleaners,' " said Deputy Dist. Atty. Wendy E. Segall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Two employees of the Whitney Museum of American Art have been charged with stealing $880,000 over a two-year period by voiding ticket sales and pocketing the cash, Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert Morgenthau said Thursday.
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