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BUSINESS
November 14, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Over the past decade, a new generation of software companies has emerged to help corporations reduce the increasing cost of employee training, which adds up to more than $40 billion a year nationwide. One such company is Courseware/Andersen Consulting, a Scripps Ranch-based software company that assists corporate clients in developing and implementing self-administered, personal computer-based learning software.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Quitters wanted: Unhappy with your job? Feeling unproductive? Take $5,000 and go. At least, that's what Amazon.com Inc. is offering its warehouse employees. In a letter to shareholders this week, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos outlined the details of a rare human resources strategy the online retail giant has launched. Dubbed Pay to Quit, the program is offered once a year to employees who work in Amazon fulfillment centers. In the first year, the offer is $2,000. After that, it rises $1,000 every year until it reaches $5,000.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
For the past three years, computer maker Alpha Microsystems' financial performance has been, well, unspectacular. Because of that, the Santa Ana company had virtually eliminated its budget for training programs intended to sharpen employees' job skills or teach them new ones. Now, thanks to a $232,000 grant from the state Employment Training Panel, Alpha Micro is providing training to 132 employees in a 58-week program that began in April. "Most of this type of training usually has to be done by outside firms," said William Mitchell, director of human resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Kate Mather
The Transportation Security Administration is calling for an increased police presence at agency checkpoints after November's deadly shooting at LAX, according to a report obtained Wednesday. The agency's assessment covers 14 recommendations relating to employee training, improved emergency technology and law enforcement presence that will be implemented at airports nationwide. TSA Administrator John Pistole told The Times it was a “measured response” to the Nov. 1 attack at LAX in which one officer was killed and three other people were wounded.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Quitters wanted: Unhappy with your job? Feeling unproductive? Take $5,000 and go. At least, that's what Amazon.com Inc. is offering its warehouse employees. In a letter to shareholders this week, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos outlined the details of a rare human resources strategy the online retail giant has launched. Dubbed Pay to Quit, the program is offered once a year to employees who work in Amazon fulfillment centers. In the first year, the offer is $2,000. After that, it rises $1,000 every year until it reaches $5,000.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997
I'm the customer service manager for AtoHaas Americas Inc. We sell Plexiglas in a joint venture with the French firm Els Atochem. AtoHaas is a subsidiary of Rohm & Haas, a specialty chemical company based in Philadelphia with $4 billion in annual sales. The employees I manage take orders over the telephone for our products and answer questions about product availability and requests for specialty items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Kate Mather
The Transportation Security Administration is calling for an increased police presence at agency checkpoints after November's deadly shooting at LAX, according to a report obtained Wednesday. The agency's assessment covers 14 recommendations relating to employee training, improved emergency technology and law enforcement presence that will be implemented at airports nationwide. TSA Administrator John Pistole told The Times it was a “measured response” to the Nov. 1 attack at LAX in which one officer was killed and three other people were wounded.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
Re "Writing Your Own Ticket" (Feb. 3): Buying entertainment tickets is a good example of how politics works in this country these days and how consumers are all too often worse off for it. Imagine any other business being allowed to advertise a product at its wholesale price, and only at the end of the transaction reveal substantial additional markups and added fees. Recently, my wife and I received a gift certificate from Ticketmaster as a wedding present. You cannot redeem the certificates on the Internet or by phone; you must go to retail premises to do so. But when I went to the Northridge Tower Records, a kid with facial staples told me their machine was busted.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1995 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite increasing calls from corporate America for a better-educated, more prepared work force, a majority of employers in Southern California said they will scale back training efforts this year. A survey conducted by Market Research Associates of Irvine found that 54% of the 1,353 companies polled planned to spend less for worker training in 1995 than they did a year ago. One-third of the respondents projected increased spending, while 4% said their training budget would stay the same.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | JANE APPLEGATE
In these tough times, when every penny counts, small-business owners may be reluctant to spend money to train employees beyond the basics of doing the job. But the money you invest in employee training now quickly reappears on your bottom line, according to experts. "Training is a morale and a performance booster," said Curtis Plott, executive vice president of Alexandria, Va.-based American Society for Training and Development.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2010 | Cyndia Zwahlen
Funny money is no joke for small-business owners. Counterfeit cash cuts into profits at firms, many of which are already struggling in the tight economy, and puts pressure on prices. The fake bills can be hard to spot with an untrained eye, and sophisticated digital printers have made it easier for criminals to create higher-quality bad bills, faster. And the problem appears to be growing. The Secret Service, which is in charge of investigating and preventing counterfeiting, said it helped remove from circulation more than $182 million in fake U.S. currency in the fiscal year that ended Sept.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
Re "Writing Your Own Ticket" (Feb. 3): Buying entertainment tickets is a good example of how politics works in this country these days and how consumers are all too often worse off for it. Imagine any other business being allowed to advertise a product at its wholesale price, and only at the end of the transaction reveal substantial additional markups and added fees. Recently, my wife and I received a gift certificate from Ticketmaster as a wedding present. You cannot redeem the certificates on the Internet or by phone; you must go to retail premises to do so. But when I went to the Northridge Tower Records, a kid with facial staples told me their machine was busted.
NEWS
March 18, 2001
Q: I was a salaried marketing manager at a local company. After giving two weeks' notice to join a competitor, I was escorted out of the building. The company contended that since I am an "at-will" employee, it has the right to discharge me before I intended to leave. What are my options? --B.M., Orange A: You probably don't have any options. In accepting your resignation, your employer is entitled to choose your final date of employment if it wishes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Disneyland is systematically updating its safety and emergency procedures, including employee training on 911 calls, park officials said Friday. The changes are in preparation for the February opening of its second park in Anaheim, Disney's California Adventure, but also follow the adoption of a new state law on theme park safety and serious ride-related accidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laying out a plan for broad reform, a top state investigator said Monday that he supports the suspension of administrators at Ventura School and has recommended top-to-bottom changes to rid the juvenile prison of chronic mismanagement and sexual misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel moved Wednesday to close a loophole that has hampered a new health crackdown on restaurants. In the process, members threw in some recommendations of their own aimed at cleaning up renegade eating establishments. "Before someone is able to open a restaurant, they should pass a basic test on how to deal with food," said Councilman Michael Feuer, chairman of the council's Arts, Health and Humanities Committee.
NEWS
March 18, 2001
Q: I was a salaried marketing manager at a local company. After giving two weeks' notice to join a competitor, I was escorted out of the building. The company contended that since I am an "at-will" employee, it has the right to discharge me before I intended to leave. What are my options? --B.M., Orange A: You probably don't have any options. In accepting your resignation, your employer is entitled to choose your final date of employment if it wishes.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Environmental Protection Agency has spent more than $1 million since 1993 on training seminars at ritzy resorts or on subjects unrelated to the environment, such as defensive driving and speed reading, according to GOP congressional investigators. Posh inns in West Virginia, a beach hotel in Puerto Rico and a mountain resort in Colorado were among venues chosen for classes and conferences, Republican investigators for the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee reported.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997
I'm the customer service manager for AtoHaas Americas Inc. We sell Plexiglas in a joint venture with the French firm Els Atochem. AtoHaas is a subsidiary of Rohm & Haas, a specialty chemical company based in Philadelphia with $4 billion in annual sales. The employees I manage take orders over the telephone for our products and answer questions about product availability and requests for specialty items.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most large American corporations have tried to give employees more control over their jobs, but only a fraction of workers touched by empowerment efforts have the tools necessary to make them work. Employers are increasingly turning to total quality management, teams and other employee involvement programs to re-energize a work force stretched to its limits by the downsizing and belt tightening that characterized re-engineering efforts of the early 1990s.
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