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NEWS
May 7, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lineman Ernie Lopez has been rousted out of bed on countless cold, rainy nights. He's climbed 100-foot utility poles in heavy winds and grabbed live electrical lines with nothing but a pair of rubber gloves to protect him. But the hardest thing Lopez has done in 20 years at Southern California Edison is walk away from a darkened apartment building while residents pleaded for their heat. It happened in late January.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
In their largest demonstration yet, truck drivers who haul cargo in and out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach will go on a limited strike Monday to protest what they contend are widespread workplace violations. The truck drivers, from some of the region's largest trucking companies, have accused the companies of illegally misclassifying them as independent contractors instead of as employees. That misclassification results in lower wages and denies them protections that employees get under state and federal labor laws, they contend.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 2012 | By Shan Li
Cheap-chic retailer Forever 21 is being sued in a class-action lawsuit by employees who claim that the company routinely neglected to pay for time worked. In filings in San Francisco Superior Court, five employees allege that the Los Angeles clothing maker often made them work through meal breaks and kept them in the stores after clocking out to check their bags for stolen merchandise, the Huffington Post reported. Tiffinee Linthicum, Jessica Ramos, Shanelle Thompson, Jazzreal Jones and Alyssa Elias are seeking damages for the hours they worked during breaks and off the clock, the Post said.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - It's not difficult to get a bonus if you work for the Internal Revenue Service - even if you haven't paid your own taxes. The IRS handed out a total of nearly $1.1 million in bonuses in a 27-month period to more than 1,146 employees who had been disciplined for failing to pay taxes, according to an inspector general's report. "This is outrageous," said Rep. Sam Johnson (R-Texas). "The IRS is essentially telling its employees: Break the law and we will reward you. " The employees were among more than 2,800 at the agency who received performance awards within one year of disciplinary action, such as suspensions or written reprimands for drug use, filing fraudulent time sheets or other misconduct, the report found.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch, often under intense scrutiny for their prodigious political contributions and prominent advocacy for various conservative causes, are back in the spotlight over a “voter information packet.” Distributed to 45,000 employees of Koch Industries-owned Georgia-Pacific, the packet, obtained by the political magazine In These Times , includes lists of candidates supported by the company stretching from...
BUSINESS
August 13, 2012 | By Michael E. Kanell
ATLANTA — Many American companies that had adopted a much-vaunted employee evaluation system have lately been turning away from it. Known as "stacked ranking" or "forced ranking," the process made famous by General Electric Co. is really just a version of what teachers call grading on the curve: a few people at the top, a few at the bottom and the rest clumped in the middle. The practice leaped into the spotlight — at least for people who study how companies perform — when Vanity Fair published in its August issue a profile of technology icon Microsoft Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Beau Nicolette
A construction contractor has been indicted on fraud charges after allegedly taking $81,000 in wages from his employees for work done on a state developmental hospital in Costa Mesa. Sourin Babayan, 64, of Glendale, was indicted last week on 14 felony counts of taking and receiving a portion of a worker's wage on a public works project, 19 felony counts related to forgery and fraud, the Daily Pilot reported. He also faces two felony counts alleging attempted fraud and seven felony counts of dissuading a potential prosecution witness, with sentencing enhancements for property damage or loss exceeding $65,000, according to the Orange County district attorney's office and the state Department of Industrial Relations.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Fast-food and other employees across the country have been striking and protesting for higher wages, arguing that they can't live on the minimum wage. Their protests have drawn attention in an economic recovery where data show that the gap between the rich and the poor is growing. Friday's jobs numbers show that the pay gap is continuing throughout industries. The Bureau of Labor Statistics tracks wages of all private-sector employees, but also breaks down wages of production and non-supervisory employees, which are “employees who are not owners or who are not primarily employed to direct, supervise, or plan the work of others.” Those workers make up 80% of the workforce, but their wages are growing more sluggishly than the wages of the whole workforce, which also includes supervisors and owners, data show.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Karin Klein
How can a person live on just McDonald's? The pay for employees, that is, not the food itself. As it happens, neither possibility is very attractive. In an effort to help its low-wage employees manage to stay afloat financially, the golden arches teamed up with Visa to produce an online brochure to guide workers through the process of paying their bills and even saving money while living on a cheap-food paycheck. It could be that the authors of the online site learned more about finances than the employees.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Amazon warehouse workers who hate their job and are eyeing the exit now have a lucrative payout offer. Online retail giant Amazon.com is offering its employees up to $5,000 if they quit, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos wrote in a letter to shareholders . Bezos spoke about a program offered to employees called "Pay to Quit" and credited Zappos, another online retailer known for its progressive human resources style, for the idea. The program is offered once a year to employees at its warehouses.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Do Internal Revenue Service employees have a dress code? Maybe, maybe not. But when they look in the mirror, they must see themselves wearing a target. The IRS is probably the most disliked of federal agencies. Any joke beginning “the Internal Revenue Service” is likely to get a nasty laugh, and almost any one of the 535 people on Capitol Hill would be eager to make his bones on some IRS slip-up. And a lot of them have. So of course we're all giving the eye-roll to the story that the IRS handed out about $1.1 million in bonuses and other valuable perks, like time off, to 1,100 rank-and-file workers who got in hot water with the agency, their employer, for not paying their own taxes.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Ken Dilianian
WASHINGTON - A new policy bars employees of U.S. spy agencies from providing reporters with "intelligence information," even if it is unclassified, without first getting official permission. Employees who violate the directive, which was issued on March 20 by James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, face disciplinary action or firing. Critics said the order adds to a climate in which intelligence agency employees face greater risk in trying to help the public understand what the government is doing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The beleaguered operator of a Vernon battery-recycling plant announced the temporary layoffs of nearly all of its employees Monday, weeks after air-quality regulators shut down its operations over air pollution concerns. Exide Technologies said in a statement that it had issued notices to 104 hourly employees and 20 managers at the facility that they could be laid off within 60 days. The plant, which has been a source of community outrage since regulators announced last year that its arsenic emissions posed a danger to more than 100,000 people, has been idle since last month.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
The goal of the Los Angeles Times is to publish a newspaper of the highest quality. This requires The Times to be, above all else, a principled newspaper. Making it so is the responsibility of every staff member. In deed and in appearance, journalists at The Times must keep themselves - and the newspaper - above reproach. The ways a newspaper can discredit itself are beyond calculation; these guidelines do not purport to cover them all. It is up to staff members to master these general principles and, beyond that, to listen carefully to their individual sense of right and wrong.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The continuing push for higher minimum wages across the country has much to recommend it, but the campaign shouldn't keep us from recognizing a truly insidious practice that impoverishes low-wage workers all the more. It's known as wage theft. Wage theft, as documented in surveys, regulatory actions and lawsuits from around the country, takes many forms: Forcing hourly employees off the clock by putting them to work before they can clock in or after they clock out. Manipulating their time cards to cheat them of overtime pay. Preventing them from taking legally mandated breaks or shaving down their lunch hours.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Amazon warehouse workers who hate their job and are eyeing the exit now have a lucrative payout offer. Online retail giant Amazon.com is offering its employees up to $5,000 if they quit, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos wrote in a letter to shareholders . Bezos spoke about a program offered to employees called "Pay to Quit" and credited Zappos, another online retailer known for its progressive human resources style, for the idea. The program is offered once a year to employees at its warehouses.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2011 | Bloomberg News
Wedbush Securities Inc. sued two former employees and trading platform Liquidnet Holdings Inc., accusing them of taking customer lists, documents and disclosures from the firm. The suit accuses New York-based Liquidnet, used by institutional investors to buy and sell large blocks of shares, and the former employees, Louis Kerner and Michael Silverstein, of working together to take proprietary information from Wedbush to start the same business at Liquidnet. Liquidnet said Monday that it had hired Kerner to run a new group focused on private companies.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple has launched a new program to assist its first-year employees on their career paths within the company. Apple revealed the program, called Pathways, to its employees Sunday night at its stores' quarterly meetings. The program is built around creating an Apple career path for new hires and extends the amount of time employees are in training during their first year at the company. Pathways comes after a major report by the New York Times , published over the weekend, that highlighted how Apple treats its 30,000 retail employees in the U.S. PHOTOS: Rumor roundup on iPhone 5 The article shed light on the fact that Apple does not pay commission to its employees, works them in high-stress environments and doesn't offer many opportunities for them to ever move up the ranks.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Quitters wanted: Unhappy with your job? Feeling unproductive? Take $5,000 and go. At least, that's what Amazon.com Inc. is offering its warehouse employees. In a letter to shareholders this week, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos outlined the details of a rare human resources strategy the online retail giant has launched. Dubbed Pay to Quit, the program is offered once a year to employees who work in Amazon fulfillment centers. In the first year, the offer is $2,000. After that, it rises $1,000 every year until it reaches $5,000.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Northwestern assailed the decision of a National Labor Relations Board regional director that the school's scholarship football players are employees and can unionize in an appeal filed Wednesday with the full board. "In this unprecedented decision, the regional director set out to alter the underlying premise upon which college varsity sports is based," Northwestern lawyers wrote. The 50-page request for review repeatedly jabbed Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB's regional director in Chicago who ruled in favor of former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter and the College Athletes Players Assn.
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