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BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Delta Air Lines Inc. said that more than 2,100 employees had volunteered to accept buyout packages to leave the company as part of its latest job-cutting effort. Severance offers were made to a majority of the 75,000 employees of the airline's mainline operations, though pilots weren't eligible.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The continuing push for higher minimum wages across the country has much to recommend it, but the campaign shouldn't keep us from recognizing a truly insidious practice that impoverishes low-wage workers all the more. It's known as wage theft. Wage theft, as documented in surveys, regulatory actions and lawsuits from around the country, takes many forms: Forcing hourly employees off the clock by putting them to work before they can clock in or after they clock out. Manipulating their time cards to cheat them of overtime pay. Preventing them from taking legally mandated breaks or shaving down their lunch hours.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Every worker in California would be eligible for paid sick leave under a bill approved Wednesday by the state Assembly. The measure goes to the Senate over the objections of Republicans, who say not all businesses can afford to pay employees for sick time. The bill by Assemblywoman Fiona Ma (D-San Francisco) passed on a 42-25 vote. Ma says 5 million Californians now have to work while they are sick or lose pay and risk being fired if they take time off. Her bill requires larger companies to pay employees for nine sick days each year.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Quitters wanted: Unhappy with your job? Feeling unproductive? Take $5,000 and go. At least, that's what Amazon.com Inc. is offering its warehouse employees. In a letter to shareholders this week, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos outlined the details of a rare human resources strategy the online retail giant has launched. Dubbed Pay to Quit, the program is offered once a year to employees who work in Amazon fulfillment centers. In the first year, the offer is $2,000. After that, it rises $1,000 every year until it reaches $5,000.
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lineman Ernie Lopez has been rousted out of bed on countless cold, rainy nights. He's climbed 100-foot utility poles in heavy winds and grabbed live electrical lines with nothing but a pair of rubber gloves to protect him. But the hardest thing Lopez has done in 20 years at Southern California Edison is walk away from a darkened apartment building while residents pleaded for their heat. It happened in late January.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
A Times investigation into the intense sales culture at Wells Fargo Bank, published in Sunday's newspaper, has drawn strong reaction from the bank's customers and employees. Many related experiences similar to those described in the story. The Times reported that rigid daily quotas caused many employees to unethically inflate sales - often by pushing unnecessary accounts or services, at times without customer permission. Some staffers begged family members to open ghost accounts; others ordered credit cards that customers never requested, or forged signatures on account paperwork.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2012 | By Shan Li
Cheap-chic retailer Forever 21 is being sued in a class-action lawsuit by employees who claim that the company routinely neglected to pay for time worked. In filings in San Francisco Superior Court, five employees allege that the Los Angeles clothing maker often made them work through meal breaks and kept them in the stores after clocking out to check their bags for stolen merchandise, the Huffington Post reported. Tiffinee Linthicum, Jessica Ramos, Shanelle Thompson, Jazzreal Jones and Alyssa Elias are seeking damages for the hours they worked during breaks and off the clock, the Post said.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2012 | By Michael E. Kanell
ATLANTA — Many American companies that had adopted a much-vaunted employee evaluation system have lately been turning away from it. Known as "stacked ranking" or "forced ranking," the process made famous by General Electric Co. is really just a version of what teachers call grading on the curve: a few people at the top, a few at the bottom and the rest clumped in the middle. The practice leaped into the spotlight — at least for people who study how companies perform — when Vanity Fair published in its August issue a profile of technology icon Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Gap Inc., the global fashion retailer, said it plans to raise the minimum wage for its U.S. employees to $9 an hour this year and $10 an hour by 2015. The move will directly benefit 65,000 U.S. employees at Gap's six retail chains, which include Gap, Old Navy and Banana Republic stores. Gap's announcement comes amid a nationwide debate about the minimum wage. President Obama praised Gap's decision and urged Congress to pass a bill that would raise the nation's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour from the current $7.25 an hour.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Quitters wanted: Unhappy with your job? Feeling unproductive? Take $5,000 and go. At least, that's what Amazon.com Inc. is offering its warehouse employees. In a letter to shareholders this week, Chief Executive Jeffrey Bezos outlined the details of a rare human resources strategy the online retail giant has launched. Dubbed Pay to Quit, the program is offered once a year to employees who work in Amazon fulfillment centers. In the first year, the offer is $2,000. After that, it rises $1,000 every year until it reaches $5,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A veteran Los Angeles building inspector sentenced last month to prison in an FBI corruption case will continue to receive a yearly pension of more than $72,000, according to a high-level retirement official. Samuel In, 66, pleaded guilty last year, admitting as part of a plea agreement that he took more than $30,000 in bribes while working as a senior inspector. He was sentenced last month to 2 1/2 years in prison after a federal prosecutor argued against leniency, mentioning his "substantial" pension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A retired Los Angeles building inspector was sentenced Monday to 2 1/2 years in prison resulting from a federal probe into bribe-taking at the Department of Building and Safety. U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson also ordered Samuel In, a 37-year city employee who retired in 2011, to pay $30,000 to the city. In, who pleaded guilty to felony bribery last year, is one of five former Building and Safety employees to face either criminal charges or dismissal as a result of the bribery probe.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg said she declined to limit her company's hiring of Google employees after being approached by two senior executives at the Internet giant. Sandberg made the declaration in a filing in San Jose federal court on Friday before a high-profile trial in May that will determine whether Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe illegally agreed not to recruit each other's employees. Sandberg and Facebook are not involved in the case, which grew out of a Department of Justice investigation that was settled in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By James Rainey
With city budget managers intent on limiting new spending and reining in employee benefits, a coalition of union and political groups is fighting back with a report that suggests Los Angeles City Hall is spending too much on Wall Street and not enough on Main Street. The Fix L.A. Coalition, which is made up of union and liberal political groups, plans to release a report Tuesday that suggests the city could substantially reduce the $204 million in bank and money management fees that it paid last year to Wall Street firms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By James Rainey
A string of actions by state officials and the National Labor Relations Board has strengthened the hand of truck drivers who say they need union representation to improve pay and working conditions for the thousands who transport cargo out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. In a settlement this week, one major trucking company agreed to post notices acknowledging the workers' right to organize - not previously a given because drivers were treated as contract workers, who are not subject to unionization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ruben Vives, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A couple who allegedly used a fake pipe bomb to commit a bank robbery in East Los Angeles in 2012 have been found guilty, the U.S. attorney's office said Monday. [For the record, 8:02 p.m. PDT, Monday, March 17, 2014: A previous version of this post incorrectly cited the Los Angeles County district attorney's office as the prosecuting agency. ] Former East Los Angeles Bank of America assistant manager Aurora Barrera and her boyfriend, Ray Vega, were found guilty of conspiracy to commit robbery and bank robbery.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch, often under intense scrutiny for their prodigious political contributions and prominent advocacy for various conservative causes, are back in the spotlight over a “voter information packet.” Distributed to 45,000 employees of Koch Industries-owned Georgia-Pacific, the packet, obtained by the political magazine In These Times , includes lists of candidates supported by the company stretching from...
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Karin Klein
How can a person live on just McDonald's? The pay for employees, that is, not the food itself. As it happens, neither possibility is very attractive. In an effort to help its low-wage employees manage to stay afloat financially, the golden arches teamed up with Visa to produce an online brochure to guide workers through the process of paying their bills and even saving money while living on a cheap-food paycheck. It could be that the authors of the online site learned more about finances than the employees.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's is facing several lawsuits filed this week by fast food workers who accuse the burger giant of systematically stealing their wages and committing other labor violations. The suits, filed Wednesday and Thursday, are seeking class-action status. Three complaints filed in the Bay Area allege that McDonald's failed to pay employees for all hours worked, skimped on overtime wages and break time, and altered pay records. A fourth case adds similar claims to a lawsuit already pending in Los Angeles County Superior Court against McDonald's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By James Rainey
A nonprofit that operates 10 health centers downtown, in South Los Angeles and in Compton will increase its employees' pay to a minimum of $15 an hour in what it deemed an anti-poverty measure intended to jump-start "living wage" efforts around the region. The wage hike by St. John's Well Child and Family Center, to be announced Thursday, will increase the pay of 137 workers, many of whom now make $11 to $12 an hour. The chief executive of the health provider said that as it celebrates its 50th year in existence, St. John's wants to honor its historic roots.
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