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Employees California

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2008 | Gale Holland
Student employees at California State University called off a threatened strike Wednesday after Darrell Steinberg, the new state Senate president pro tem, offered to mediate between the union and the college system. United Auto Workers Local 4123, representing about 6,000 students working as teaching and research assistants and tutors, is asking the university to give its members free tuition and fees, a benefit extended to other Cal State employees. The university says it can ill afford the estimated $8-million to $11-million cost of the proposal in the middle of the deepening state budget crisis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
Nearly 530,000 teachers, administrators, custodians and other school employees across California will receive cash bonuses of almost $600 because their campuses significantly boosted test scores, state officials announced this week. The one-time rewards will reach employees at 4,502 schools--more than half of the state's campuses--as early as next month. Every employee at the schools will receive money under the $350-million program, known as the School Site Employee Performance Bonus.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest hospital operator, said Monday that it was strengthening its compliance team. The Santa Barbara-based company, which has 40 hospitals and 35,000 employees in California, has been the subject of several regulatory investigations into its billing and recruiting practices Tenet named Cheryl Wagonhurst, 43, its chief compliance officer. She will oversee a 40-person team that will include clinicians, accountants and legal experts.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
California should link pay raises to performance and eliminate tenure for its 185,000 Civil Service workers, a government watchdog panel is recommending. The Little Hoover Commission also recommended turning more public work over to private industry, going outside Civil Service to hire government supervisors and making it easier for the state to promote and fire state employees. "California's Civil Service system . . .
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The Times 100 survey of California's publicly traded companies sheds considerable light on the present shape and future of the state's economy, but missing--and herewith accounted for--are many large and well-known companies that are privately held. Among those who eluded The Times 100 criteria, for example, is the world's largest and probably most secretive winery, Modesto's E & J Gallo, one of about 20 privately held concerns with annual sales close to or exceeding $1 billion.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
State officials have fined hospital chain Prime Healthcare Services Inc. $95,000 for violating patient confidentiality by sharing a woman's medical files with journalists and sending an email about her treatment to 785 hospital employees. The California Department of Public Health levied the fine this month after determining in May that Shasta Regional Medical Center in Redding had five deficiencies related to the unauthorized disclosure of medical information on a diabetes patient treated there in 2010.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Engineering giant Bechtel Corp. agreed to pay $18.5 million to settle a lawsuit alleging that the fees charged to employees in its 401(k) retirement plan were too high. The class-action lawsuit brought by two former Bechtel employees in California alleged that the San Francisco-based company should have used its massive size to negotiate lower expenses for the more than 17,000 people in its 401(k) plan. The settlement would mark the latest advance for workers who have brought suits alleging that employers allowed 401(k)
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials from eight cities gathered at Covina City Hall to call for a statewide initiative to guarantee a minimum share of the state's tax revenues for cities. "I think it's time that we should stand up and say that traditional revenue should be maintained by cities," Covina Councilman Chris Lancaster said Monday at a press conference he organized. "Otherwise, some cities will die and become obsolete."
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