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Employees California

BUSINESS
August 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest hospital operator, said Monday that it was strengthening its compliance team. The Santa Barbara-based company, which has 40 hospitals and 35,000 employees in California, has been the subject of several regulatory investigations into its billing and recruiting practices Tenet named Cheryl Wagonhurst, 43, its chief compliance officer. She will oversee a 40-person team that will include clinicians, accountants and legal experts.
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NEWS
May 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
California should link pay raises to performance and eliminate tenure for its 185,000 Civil Service workers, a government watchdog panel is recommending. The Little Hoover Commission also recommended turning more public work over to private industry, going outside Civil Service to hire government supervisors and making it easier for the state to promote and fire state employees. "California's Civil Service system . . .
BUSINESS
April 27, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
Virginia has won the fight to be the new home of Northrop Grumman Corp. The defense giant, now headquartered in Century City, said Monday that it would settle in the Falls Church area outside Washington. Northrop announced in January that it was moving east to be closer to its key customer, the U.S. government. Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia had been vying to land the company. Not all the 360 employees at the Century City office will get offers to move with the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2012 | By Jason Song and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County probation officer was arrested Tuesday for allegedly filing nine fraudulent workers' compensation claims over the last three years. Rochelle Williams of Inglewood, a six-year Probation Department employee who placed youths in foster homes and other facilities, was taken into custody at the agency's Downey headquarters by probation employees and California Department of Insurance investigators. Williams, 35, is accused in 27 felony counts of forging departmental as well as medical documents, including signatures, to support her claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Students who are sexually abused by school employees may sue public districts if their administrators ignored warning signs or failed to monitor the employees, the California Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday. The state high court's ruling revived a lawsuit against the William S. Hart Union High School District by a student who alleged that a counselor repeatedly abused him sexually. The suit said that school administrators knew or should have known that the counselor, Roselyn Hubbell, had a propensity for sexual abuse when they hired her at Golden Valley High School in Santa Clarita.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The Times 100 survey of California's publicly traded companies sheds considerable light on the present shape and future of the state's economy, but missing--and herewith accounted for--are many large and well-known companies that are privately held. Among those who eluded The Times 100 criteria, for example, is the world's largest and probably most secretive winery, Modesto's E & J Gallo, one of about 20 privately held concerns with annual sales close to or exceeding $1 billion.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials from eight cities gathered at Covina City Hall to call for a statewide initiative to guarantee a minimum share of the state's tax revenues for cities. "I think it's time that we should stand up and say that traditional revenue should be maintained by cities," Covina Councilman Chris Lancaster said Monday at a press conference he organized. "Otherwise, some cities will die and become obsolete."
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | Associated Press
States are under no special legal obligation to pay unemployment benefits to women who lose their jobs after taking maternity leave, the Supreme Court ruled today. The court said a federal law barring discrimination based on pregnancy in unemployment benefit payments bans states from singling out pregnancy for unfavorable treatment only. The law does not mandate preferential treatment for pregnant workers, the court said.
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