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Employees California

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
Nearly 530,000 teachers, administrators, custodians and other school employees across California will receive cash bonuses of almost $600 because their campuses significantly boosted test scores, state officials announced this week. The one-time rewards will reach employees at 4,502 schools--more than half of the state's campuses--as early as next month. Every employee at the schools will receive money under the $350-million program, known as the School Site Employee Performance Bonus.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tenet Healthcare Corp., the nation's second-largest hospital operator, said Monday that it was strengthening its compliance team. The Santa Barbara-based company, which has 40 hospitals and 35,000 employees in California, has been the subject of several regulatory investigations into its billing and recruiting practices Tenet named Cheryl Wagonhurst, 43, its chief compliance officer. She will oversee a 40-person team that will include clinicians, accountants and legal experts.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
California should link pay raises to performance and eliminate tenure for its 185,000 Civil Service workers, a government watchdog panel is recommending. The Little Hoover Commission also recommended turning more public work over to private industry, going outside Civil Service to hire government supervisors and making it easier for the state to promote and fire state employees. "California's Civil Service system . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2002 | WILLIAM OVEREND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 20 members of the special crew of forest firefighters barracked in the mountains east of here--19 men and one woman--are part of an elite national force known as the Hotshots. Based at the Los Prietos Ranger Station in the Los Padres National Forest, they travel the country wherever needed, fighting fires 12 hours a day for weeks at a time and sleeping on the ground. They go as far as Colorado and New Mexico, usually in trucks called "crew buggies." The U.S.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
California is poised once again to compete for the crown as the nation's leading graveyard for business superstars trying to make the jump into politics. With election day yet 48 hours away, it's still possible that Meg Whitman and Carly Fiorina will prevail in their campaigns for governor and U.S. senator. But the betting and the opinion polls are pointing the other way. So as we face the likely, if not certain, wreckage of these two lavishly financed campaigns, it's proper to ponder anew the following question: Why do big-time CEOs make such terrible politicians?
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The Times 100 survey of California's publicly traded companies sheds considerable light on the present shape and future of the state's economy, but missing--and herewith accounted for--are many large and well-known companies that are privately held. Among those who eluded The Times 100 criteria, for example, is the world's largest and probably most secretive winery, Modesto's E & J Gallo, one of about 20 privately held concerns with annual sales close to or exceeding $1 billion.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials from eight cities gathered at Covina City Hall to call for a statewide initiative to guarantee a minimum share of the state's tax revenues for cities. "I think it's time that we should stand up and say that traditional revenue should be maintained by cities," Covina Councilman Chris Lancaster said Monday at a press conference he organized. "Otherwise, some cities will die and become obsolete."
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | Associated Press
States are under no special legal obligation to pay unemployment benefits to women who lose their jobs after taking maternity leave, the Supreme Court ruled today. The court said a federal law barring discrimination based on pregnancy in unemployment benefit payments bans states from singling out pregnancy for unfavorable treatment only. The law does not mandate preferential treatment for pregnant workers, the court said.
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