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Employees Education

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BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | ROBERT BURNS, Times Staff Writer
With workers skilled in reading, writing and math already in short supply and that shortage expected to worsen over the next decade, businesses increasingly are getting involved in education at all levels. From tutoring individual students to school district policy decisions, employers have discovered that they have a stake in the educational system. "Business is becoming more and more aware of the fact that students today are not prepared to fill the entry-level jobs," said Janet Keyes, Western regional vice president of the National Alliance of Business.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1998 | STEVE GINSBERG, Steve Ginsberg writes for the Washington Post
Course: Finance 101, taught by Mobil Corp. Open to all employees. That's right, the Fairfax, Va.-based oil company is teaching people about financial planning. Mobil offers three financial management programs to its workers: basic money management, a full-day seminar during regular working hours at a cost of $25 per employee; savings investing, a free two-hour seminar; and pre-retirement investing, a free two-day workshop for employees over 50.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite an increasing dependence on technology in the workplace, only 16% of U.S. workers receive company-sponsored training to keep their skills up to date, according to a recent survey by the American Society for Training and Development. Employers who are willing to play the role of educator are heroes, U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich said in an address Tuesday to members of the national organization, which is holding its annual convention here this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Capping more than nine months of talks, school district officials and union leaders tentatively agreed Friday to a 7% raise for about 1,400 employees and teachers. Although faculty members and nonteaching employees have received small increases to offset the rise in the cost of living, the district had not granted any substantial raises in at least five years because of past financial trouble, district officials said.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many companies have discovered there is one way to ensure that employees follow the rules: Make sure they know how to read them. In California, where Department of Education surveys have shown that about 50% of the adult population is at risk of being functionally illiterate and where many employees speak English as a second language, companies are increasingly focusing on literacy in the workplace.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a time of high anxiety in the workplace, an era when rank-and-file Americans struggle with a new and alien code of survival, listen to "Doc" Windle conduct his class at the world's busiest truck-trailer factory. "Your hands aren't enough anymore," declares the Purdue University professor who helps pump up the brainpower at Wabash National's sprawling plant in the heart of Indiana, a once-struggling region that has enjoyed a renaissance in the 1990s. "Your brawn isn't enough.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
By the time she reached her early 30s, Deb Olander had a bachelor's degree in math, a master's degree in operations research and seven years of experience with the Massachusetts-based Digital Equipment Corp. Still, she felt restless and found herself "looking around for something new." Two years ago, after returning from maternity leave for her first child, Olander joined Digital's pioneering Engineers Into Education program.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1998 | STEVE GINSBERG, Steve Ginsberg writes for the Washington Post
Course: Finance 101, taught by Mobil Corp. Open to all employees. That's right, the Fairfax, Va.-based oil company is teaching people about financial planning. Mobil offers three financial management programs to its workers: basic money management, a full-day seminar during regular working hours at a cost of $25 per employee; savings investing, a free two-hour seminar; and pre-retirement investing, a free two-day workshop for employees over 50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1991 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN
About 70 employees of Oxnard's Rio Elementary School District picketed a board meeting this week to protest proposed cuts of about $500,000 from the district's budget. District officials have proposed the cuts to offset a projected shortfall in state funds to public schools next school year. But employees in Rio's 129-member classified employees union protested Wednesday because the cuts could reduce working hours for secretaries, janitors and others and could limit medical benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration's AIDS education program for federal employees has come under fire from Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove), who charged Wednesday that it "promotes homosexuality or bisexuality as just another healthy lifestyle choice." In a letter to Rep. William F. Clinger Jr. (R-Pa.), chairman of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, Dornan called for congressional hearings on the program, saying he has received "dozens of complaints" from federal workers.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a time of high anxiety in the workplace, an era when rank-and-file Americans struggle with a new and alien code of survival, listen to "Doc" Windle conduct his class at the world's busiest truck-trailer factory. "Your hands aren't enough anymore," declares the Purdue University professor who helps pump up the brainpower at Wabash National's sprawling plant in the heart of Indiana, a once-struggling region that has enjoyed a renaissance in the 1990s. "Your brawn isn't enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration's AIDS education program for federal employees has come under fire from Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove), who charged Wednesday that it "promotes homosexuality or bisexuality as just another healthy lifestyle choice." In a letter to Rep. William F. Clinger Jr. (R-Pa.), chairman of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, Dornan called for congressional hearings on the program, saying he has received "dozens of complaints" from federal workers.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1995 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many companies have discovered there is one way to ensure that employees follow the rules: Make sure they know how to read them. In California, where Department of Education surveys have shown that about 50% of the adult population is at risk of being functionally illiterate and where many employees speak English as a second language, companies are increasingly focusing on literacy in the workplace.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite an increasing dependence on technology in the workplace, only 16% of U.S. workers receive company-sponsored training to keep their skills up to date, according to a recent survey by the American Society for Training and Development. Employers who are willing to play the role of educator are heroes, U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich said in an address Tuesday to members of the national organization, which is holding its annual convention here this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of the Ventura County Community College District board said he wants instructors and all other employees at Oxnard, Moorpark and Ventura colleges to attend mandatory classes on avoiding sexual harassment. Board President Pete Tafoya said a workshop or seminar is needed to clarify the district's policy against sexual harassment, and plans to suggest the idea at Tuesday's trustee meeting. "The definition is not really clear-cut," Tafoya said.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
By the time she reached her early 30s, Deb Olander had a bachelor's degree in math, a master's degree in operations research and seven years of experience with the Massachusetts-based Digital Equipment Corp. Still, she felt restless and found herself "looking around for something new." Two years ago, after returning from maternity leave for her first child, Olander joined Digital's pioneering Engineers Into Education program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County auditors have discovered that at least 11 county employees "received questionable overpayments" for tuition and other college expenses reimbursed by educational programs, a report revealed Thursday. "Sufficient controls and procedures were not established by the personnel department management to adequately protect the interest of the county," Auditor-Controller Norman R. Hawkes wrote in a cover letter for the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of the Ventura County Community College District board said he wants instructors and all other employees at Oxnard, Moorpark and Ventura colleges to attend mandatory classes on avoiding sexual harassment. Board President Pete Tafoya said a workshop or seminar is needed to clarify the district's policy against sexual harassment, and plans to suggest the idea at Tuesday's trustee meeting. "The definition is not really clear-cut," Tafoya said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County auditors have discovered that at least 11 county employees "received questionable overpayments" for tuition and other college expenses reimbursed by educational programs, a report revealed Thursday. "Sufficient controls and procedures were not established by the personnel department management to adequately protect the interest of the county," Auditor-Controller Norman R. Hawkes wrote in a cover letter for the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1991 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN
About 70 employees of Oxnard's Rio Elementary School District picketed a board meeting this week to protest proposed cuts of about $500,000 from the district's budget. District officials have proposed the cuts to offset a projected shortfall in state funds to public schools next school year. But employees in Rio's 129-member classified employees union protested Wednesday because the cuts could reduce working hours for secretaries, janitors and others and could limit medical benefits.
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