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NEWS
June 13, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Shoshana Zuboff, a Harvard University business professor, once asked a group of office clerks whose jobs had recently been computerized to draw pictures of themselves at work. The clerks variously portrayed themselves as chained to desks, clothed in prison stripes, trapped by walls, deprived of sunlight and food, wearing blinders, surrounded by bottles of aspirin, bleary-eyed with fatigue and frowning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel said Monday that she would seek an extra $175 million in savings from the city's budget by using such strategies as cutting the City Council's discretionary funds and changing the investment practices of its employee retirement systems. Appearing with several business leaders, Greuel said her budget plan would generate $60 million in savings per year by reducing the size of public employee health benefits and workers' compensation outlays by 10%. Another $40 million could be found, she said, by modifying the way the city's pension boards invest and cutting the amount they spend on consultants.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
Small-business owners unable to afford full-service medical coverage for their employees may be unfamiliar with a lower-cost alternative: employee health promotion. Unlike health insurance, which provides physician care and hospitalization for employees, health promotion provides education and screening in such areas as diet, smoking, stress, cholesterol, diabetes, cancer, parenting and workplace safety. The idea is to prevent health problems, rather than wait for illness to strike.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
A new study finds that 49% of U.S. workers in small businesses were offered health insurance in 2010, down from 58% in 2003. Firms with 100 or more employees were far more likely to provide health benefits, at 90% in both 2003 and 2010, according to the report from the Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that does healthcare research. Low-wage workers in small businesses were the least likely to be offered coverage: One-third of workers making less than $15 an hour in small firms were able to enroll in their employer's health plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers who helped assemble rockets at Rocketdyne's Santa Susana Field Laboratory died from lung cancer at twice the rate of other workers at the facility, researchers reported Friday. After a six-year study, researchers at UCLA's School of Public Health released their second and final report examining the cancer risk to employees who worked at the laboratory between 1950 and 1994.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blow to a high-tech industry that has long portrayed itself as a "clean" manufacturer, IBM Corp. settled a lawsuit with two former employees who claimed that exposure to toxic fumes at one of the computer giant's plants caused their son's birth defects.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing an end to an acrimonious chapter in U.S. nuclear history, a federal judge has ruled against six men who claimed that they contracted cancer from exposure to radiation at the Nevada Test Site, an infamous stretch of restricted desert north of Las Vegas. U.S. District Judge Phillip Pro ruled that the government was immune to lawsuits in such matters and therefore he had no jurisdiction to rule in the case.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson lent a sympathetic ear Saturday to bar owners angered by a month-old ban on smoking in their establishments, but he stopped short of favoring a bid to repeal the prohibition. Wilson, whose administration has prided itself on making California more business friendly, suggested that he supports establishing refuges for bar smokers.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Prevention programs in the workplace can reduce the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome and lower back strain, but more research is needed to understand what kinds of programs work, a U.S. government advisory panel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON
Stick a spider plant on your desk, perch a peace lily on your computer, hang a golden pothos by your window, and horticulturist Paul Needleman believes you'll soon be breathing easier. "Plants take the crap we can't handle out of the air and turn it into food," he explains earnestly. From his Burbank warehouse, Needleman pushes this philosophy as he peddles plants to those who run industrial factories and corporate beehives and posh hotels. It's not as easy as it sounds.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2012 | Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court's endorsement of the federal healthcare law this week could spur more employers across the nation to relinquish their long-standing role as chief healthcare buyer for their workers. This shift has already begun among some big employers shedding their role in providing retiree health benefits, and experts say the court's decision this week could eventually lead companies to pursue a similar approach with current workers. With the Affordable Care Act still on track to offer numerous new benefits, such as guaranteed coverage for all adults starting in 2014, some companies may want to stop providing health coverage and instead give workers money to buy their own. One of the more popular ideas being discussed is to give workers a lump sum, or defined contribution, and then let them use that money to buy their own individual health plan.
HEALTH
May 25, 2011 | By Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health News
"That's where the money is," Willie Sutton famously quipped when asked why he robbed banks. There's a similar rationale for employers who hope to improve employee health and contain costs with workplace health clinics: That's where the people are. Day in and day out, workers troop into the office, spending the better part of their waking hours there. What better place to have medical staff on hand, not only to treat sore throats and cut fingers but also to help employees stay healthy by offering on-site preventive tests and screenings, and health coaching to encourage healthful habits?
HEALTH
January 31, 2011
Your Jan. 3 story "Is It Your Boss' Business?" contains a misrepresentation about Safeway's experience controlling healthcare costs. Here are the facts straight from the source. Safeway's "all in" healthcare costs (for employees and the company) are the same today as they were five years ago, which is 33% lower than the national average increase in healthcare costs. During this period, Safeway reversed the national trend of rising obesity within our workforce and reduced the weight of that same group year-over-year.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey and Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times
The National Restaurant Assn. and insurance giant UnitedHealth Group Inc. are teaming up in a bid to make coverage more accessible to millions of restaurant workers without health benefits — three years ahead of when the healthcare overhaul would require everyone to have insurance. The initiative, though limited at the outset, marks one of the largest private-sector efforts to expand health insurance coverage. And its architects said it could ultimately help cover the 4 million to 6 million restaurant employees without health benefits, or about 10% of the nation's current population of uninsured.
HEALTH
December 1, 2003
I read "Bosses Assign a New Task: Stay Well" (Nov. 17) with great alarm. This policy is so discriminatory that I am surprised no lawsuits have been initiated. It's fine to offer health information and support to employees, but to penalize those who decline it is an assault on our civil liberties. The day an employer forces me to join a health program or lose health benefits is the day I quit. The arrogance of employers putting all the health responsibility on the employees' shoulders is outrageous!
OPINION
October 18, 2003
Re "A Health Bargain on the Job," Commentary, Oct. 14: Sherry Glied offers only two options for Americans wanting to obtain health insurance: through employers or "the same way they buy auto insurance." This misses an important option, whose time may now have come. Single-payer, universal health care would do more to help American businesses and, in turn, American workers than tax breaks to the wealthy, protectionist tariffs or anything else the current administration is implementing and would provide coverage for the 42 million of us who are uninsured.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Job-related injuries and illnesses are more common than most people believe, costing the nation far more than AIDS or Alzheimer's disease and at least as much as cancer or heart disease, a new report says in today's issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study combined government and other data. In 1992, about 66,800 Americans died and about 14 million were hurt by or ill from work-related causes, said the group, led by J. Paul Leigh of Cal State San Jose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State health officials said Thursday that $341,000 the federal government recently allocated for a worker health study at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth is insufficient to do the long-awaited report.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2002 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
JWANENG, Botswana -- The digging does not stop. Not when night falls or when a three-year drought sears the countryside or when the nation edges toward famine. Workers for Debswana Diamond Co. have not stopped digging for 20 years, scooping out enough wealth to make Jwaneng the world's richest diamond mine and Botswana's economy one of the fastest-growing in southern Africa. Gems, and the miners who dig them up, are building the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The biggest HMO scramble in recent memory has begun at the California Public Employees Retirement System, with nearly 150,000 of its 1.2 million enrollees forced to find new health plans for 2002. "It's just a real bummer," said state worker Jennifer Barton, 40, whose health plan of more than four years, Aetna, has been dropped. "I have no idea what I'm going to do next or who I'm going to go with."
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