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Employees Health

BUSINESS
June 30, 1988 | Associated Press
A panel of health and employment experts concluded Wednesday that most workers do not risk getting AIDS at work, and it advised companies against screening current or prospective employees for AIDS or the HIV virus. The 36-member panel, meeting under the auspices of the World Health Organization and the International Labor Organization, also recommended that workers suffering from AIDS or those infected with the AIDS virus be given the same access to health benefits as other workers.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Each year, thousands of Californians injured on the job learn that, except under the rarest of circumstances, they cannot sue their employers, even if they believe that their injuries are their employers' fault. Injured employees are entitled only to benefits under a no-fault system called workers compensation. This system began 75 years ago when employees traded their right to sue--and perhaps lose--for modest, but sure benefits. These include free medical care, now up to $224 a week in lost wages, and small sums to compensate for permanent physical losses: $840, for instance, for the loss of a finger; $13,000 for the loss of an eye. Since 1975, injured workers unable to return to their old jobs have also been entitled to free retraining.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pediatric nurse Kimberly Reno said she was fired from a job after her supervisors learned that she had cancer. What was worse, Reno's attorneys say, was a judge ruling that California law prevented her from suing the two bosses for discrimination. Today, the California Supreme Court in San Francisco will hear oral arguments in Reno's case and attempt to resolve a question: Can supervisors be held personally liable if they discriminate in the workplace?
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
As he groped for a way to take charge of the drug issue, Vice President George Bush on Thursday ran into Eric Dillingham. "The streets are flooded with heroin--high, high quality," Dillingham, 30, told Bush inside the Newark drug rehabilitation center where he received treatment. "There's so much drugs, it's so available, it's so good and it just grabs you. "It is creating a whole new generation of drug addicts," Dillingham said.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doug Watson was making good time on his morning commute. His bright red Subaru slipped its way like a speeding toboggan down the twisting mountain roads near his Lake Arrowhead home. But after Watson descended into the San Bernardino flatlands, the brilliant Alpine sunshine gave way to a dishwater-colored haze and a traffic jam on the transition to southbound Interstate 215. "The pretty part is over," the 49-year-old Los Angeles police captain said. He was right.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Labor Secretary Elaine Chao confirmed that her agency will oversee a new compensation program for sick Cold War-era nuclear weapon workers but said Wednesday that it will not meet a congressional deadline to accept applications. Chao had wanted to shift control of the program to the Justice Department, which she said was better suited to oversee it.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | Reuters
A U.S. consumer group and a labor union today are making a Labor Day appeal to the government to protect workers' health by lowering the permissible exposure to beryllium, a metal linked to a fatal lung disease. Beryllium is commonly used in the manufacture of sporting goods, dental equipment and airplane parts. Workers can inhale beryllium fumes or dust during manufacturing.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest toxic pollution verdicts ever rendered, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury has awarded $760 million in punitive damages to 38 past and present Lockheed workers found to have suffered harm from chemicals while building the Stealth fighter in Burbank.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1996 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, the 31-year-old computer systems manager for a global drug company in Southern California felt crushing job pressures. He ran a department of 35, answered to bosses across several divisions and sometimes found himself working up to 48 hours without a break. "A major part of the system would crash and we'd be getting phone calls from literally everywhere, demanding systems be brought up," he said. "The pressure was just from everywhere."
BUSINESS
April 14, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers with the AIDS virus cost their employers far less in medical and other expenses than is commonly believed. The average patient's tab amounts to $17,000, a new report says. Paul Farnham, a Georgia State University health economist who was a co-author of the study, said many employers have been misled by estimates of medical costs related to HIV and AIDS.
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