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Employees Layoffs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a new superintendent and two new school board members now in place, officials of the financially beleaguered Simi Valley Unified School District say their primary focus will be to improve relations with teachers. How successful they will be may be determined next month when teacher contract negotiations begin. The negotiations come at a time when Ventura County's largest school district--18,000 students and 26 campuses--is still grappling with the effects of $8 million in budget cuts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2011 | By Joseph Serna and Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Costa Mesa has sent layoff notices to nearly half its employees in a dramatic austerity program being closely watched by other cities struggling with ballooning pension obligations. City officials said the cuts were the first step in a plan to outsource many services to the private sector and significantly reduce the number of workers at City Hall. The six-month termination notices affect 213 of the city's 472 full-time employees and cut across departments ? firefighters, maintenance workers, jail staff, even dogcatchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Inside the cavernous Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center, seated on a makeshift stage and flanked by attorneys, Administrative Law Judge Paul Hogan spends hours sifting through questions about seniority lists and notification procedures.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Brookstone clerk Edward Enage stood Monday in front of a four-foot pile of nail clippers, gardening tools and other sharp objects that were pulled from shelves at Los Angeles International Airport. Police went through the store last week, identifying potentially dangerous goods. "They don't even want tweezers," Enage said. As LAX came fully to life Monday, passengers and workers got a taste of just how different it will be.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | JILL GOTTESMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listeners who tune in to KLON-FM at Cal State Long Beach will get more blues and less news in the wake of recent layoffs at the jazz radio station. A budget crunch has forced KLON to lay off six employees, including four from the news staff, officials said. Gone are morning news anchor Debra Baer and one full-time reporter, Frank Stoltze. The news section's two-man production staff, which produced news features and took news feeds from reporters in the field, has also been eliminated.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1990 | MICHAEL TRIMARCHI, WASHINGTON POST
"Clean out your desk. You're fired!" For bosses who graduated from the Simon Legree school of management, terminating a worker might be as easy as those six words. But more often, firing an employee can be almost as traumatic for the manager as it is for the worker. "Managers, like most people, find it difficult to be confrontational," said Molly Shepard, president of the career development consulting firm Manchester Inc. in King of Prussia, Pa. "Firing needs to be a more dignified process."
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In August, AIL Systems Inc. plans to close the doors of its facility in Westlake Village and lay off most of the 290 employees there, ending the workers' role in the story of the U. S. Air Force's beleaguered B-1 bomber. AIL's employees will face a tough job market, joining thousands of Southern California aerospace industry workers who've lost their jobs recently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2011 | By Joe Piasecki, Los Angeles Times
Despite a $50-million budget cut, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La CaƱada Flintridge probably won't face another round of mass layoffs, a legislative affairs official for the agency said. Federal spending reductions have put support for space exploration and other science programs in jeopardy, but JPL's budget will remain relatively stable at $1.5 billion for the coming year. The laboratory will probably be able to avoid "another large change in workforce," said Richard O'Toole, manager of legislative affairs.
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