Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmployees Rights
IN THE NEWS

Employees Rights

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission asked a court, for the first time, to stop a company from testing its employees for genetic defects, setting up an unprecedented legal battle over medical privacy in the workplace. In a petition filed in U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 22, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Wisconsin Republicans on Monday turned up the heat on Democratic state senators who fled to Illinois last week to block passage of a controversial bill that would eliminate collective bargaining for most public employee unions. Republican Gov. Scott Walker warned that if his proposal is not passed by Friday, the state could miss a chance to refinance bonds and save more than $100 million. To make up the gap, Walker said at an afternoon press conference, 1,500 state workers would have to be laid off. "For those 14 Senate Democrats, you've had your time," Walker said.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | By DAVID G. SAVAGE,
The Supreme Court on Tuesday stripped the nation's 5 million state workers--as well as California's teachers and public school employees--of federal protection against age discrimination. On a 5-4 vote, the court ruled that state agencies, including public colleges, are shielded from lawsuits filed by their workers under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2008 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County has paid more than $4 million in the last two years to settle discrimination, harassment and wrongful-termination claims brought by county employees but has never publicly justified the settlements. County supervisors, saying that taxpayers deserved to know why they settle other lawsuits, last year voted to publicly disclose legal evaluations written by county lawyers for each case. But they allowed the attorneys to make an exception for employee-related settlements.
NEWS
November 7, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional opponents of the Clinton administration's bid for increased authority to negotiate free trade accords are pointing to a grimy Tijuana factory where they say workers won an uphill election for what is being billed as the first independent union of the border maquiladora factories--but lost their jobs. Even a manager of the Han Young plant, which supplies tractor-trailer chassis for Hyundai Precision America in San Diego, concedes that the independent union won the Oct. 6 election.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
When a big ballgame is on the schedule, injured athletes often insist that they have to "play through the pain" for the sake of the team. And while many working people do the same thing on the job, others head to the sidelines when their backs ache or their heads throb--hurting their employers' bottom lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Holding that the right of private citizens to be public watchdogs is "embedded in our constitutional system," a federal judge Friday upheld the constitutionality of a 1986 whistle-blower law that allows people with knowledge of fraud against the government to take government contractors to court. U.S. District Judge William D. Keller rejected a challenge from a variety of major aerospace contractors who had sought to throw out the 1986 amendments to the federal False Claims Act, which they claim encourage disgruntled employees to file frivolous fraud lawsuits that can tie up major weapons and aircraft programs in years of litigation.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The widely anticipated turn to the right by the newly aligned California Supreme Court emerged in strikingly clear form in a range of decisions issued during 1988. In the past, under a liberal majority led by former Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird, business, insurers and law enforcement repeatedly suffered defeat. But last year, under a more conservative court led by Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas, yesterday's losers became today's consistent winners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | Associated Press
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued a company for firing a Muslim worker who refused, for religious reasons, to shave his beard. ABB Alstom Power/Integrated C-E Services fired Faieclice Bey of Pittsburgh on March 5 for violating its rule that employees must remain cleanshaven so that half-face respirator masks will remain sealed to their skin, the lawsuit states.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1998 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mary Cummings, the lone woman on a maintenance crew at a South San Francisco hospital, filed a sexual harassment complaint after enduring what she described as 15 years of unwanted sexual advances, verbal abuse and even sexual assault at the hands of her boss. The payback? Cummings' boss assigned her to menial tasks, colleagues refused to work with her and, she said, almost every day somebody went to management to bad-mouth her performance.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2005 | Molly Selvin and Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writers
Lawyers for employers and employees agree: A leaked Wal-Mart memo proposing ways to cut healthcare costs could mean big legal trouble for the world's largest retailer. Even if the company accepts none of the questionable suggestions it contains, the memo will furnish plaintiffs' attorneys with evidence to argue that Wal-Mart Stores Inc. discriminates against some workers, said Jeffrey Winikow, a Century City employee-rights lawyer. "The memo is a cesspool of legal violations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2004 | Sandra Murillo, Times Staff Writer
Since 1990, Carol Wright has held the unglamorous title of substitute teacher. She works three jobs, clips coupons and spoils herself with a vacation every five to 10 years. Her modest, one-story home in San Bernardino has a minifridge and no stove. She's put up with years of low pay and students who don't like to listen to a "sub" and, in exchange, has avoided the grind of a full-time job.
NEWS
April 12, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON and PETER GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A divided House on Thursday approved new rules designed to better protect the retirement savings of American workers, the first Enron Corp.-inspired reform to pass since the collapse of the energy giant. The Republican-sponsored measure, approved 255 to 163, contains key elements of a proposal advanced by President Bush to spare American workers the same fate as Enron employees, whose retirement nest eggs vanished when the highflying Houston company filed for bankruptcy protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | TINA DAUNT and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of people--including Gov. Gray Davis, Cardinal Roger Mahony and some of the nation's top union leaders--attended rallies and church services across Los Angeles County on Monday to push for immigrant rights and better wages. On the eve of the meetings between President George W. Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox, Mahony and the head of the powerful AFL-CIO used a church pulpit to call for legalizing millions of undocumented workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During last fall's 32-day transit strike, Charles Square and fellow union activists gathered at Holman United Methodist Church to discuss developments and plan strategy with community members. On Sunday, on the eve of Labor Day, Square returned to the church to say thank you. Square was among two dozen union leaders who visited five predominantly black churches, presenting each with a $2,500 check and asking for their continued support.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission asked a court, for the first time, to stop a company from testing its employees for genetic defects, setting up an unprecedented legal battle over medical privacy in the workplace. In a petition filed in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The National Labor Relations Board in Los Angeles dealt a blow Tuesday to an organizing campaign aimed at unionizing gravediggers who work at 10 cemeteries operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. "The cemetery operations are integral to the Catholic Church's religious mission and rituals" and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Act, said the board in an opinion signed by Regional Director Victoria E. Aguayo.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a major victory for workers, the California Supreme Court held Monday that employees may collect damages from companies that demote them in violation of established disciplinary rules. The unanimous decision marked the first time the California high court has recognized the rights of workers to sue companies for improper demotions. In the past, workers could sue only for unlawful terminations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2000
I am writing to you as the business representative for the 195 employees of the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees to address issues raised in recent articles and the Nov. 30 editorial regarding the CRA. The employees of the L.A. Community Redevelopment Agency are committed, professional employees who have continually toiled to carry out the mission of the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | Associated Press
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued a company for firing a Muslim worker who refused, for religious reasons, to shave his beard. ABB Alstom Power/Integrated C-E Services fired Faieclice Bey of Pittsburgh on March 5 for violating its rule that employees must remain cleanshaven so that half-face respirator masks will remain sealed to their skin, the lawsuit states.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|