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BUSINESS
May 8, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
Before investors became skittish about high-tech start-up companies, American workers already were feeling reluctant to go and work for them, according to a survey released last week. Nearly 43% of the 700 workers surveyed said they would not be interested in working for the low pay and stock options typically offered by pre-initial public offering firms, and another 44% said they would consider a start-up only if they received a "competitive salary," according to the survey.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
Before investors became skittish about high-tech start-up companies, American workers already were feeling reluctant to go and work for them, according to a survey released last week. Nearly 43% of the 700 workers surveyed said they would not be interested in working for the low pay and stock options typically offered by pre-initial public offering firms, and another 44% said they would consider a start-up only if they received a "competitive salary," according to the survey.
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NEWS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As major U.S. companies race to merge in a record flurry of multibillion-dollar transactions, the justifications for each deal are virtually identical: a desire for new synergies, a need to cut costs, a rush to reach a size that begets a greater sense of market control. But where does this leave the average American?
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As major U.S. companies race to merge in a record flurry of multibillion-dollar transactions, the justifications for each deal are virtually identical: a desire for new synergies, a need to cut costs, a rush to reach a size that begets a greater sense of market control. But where does this leave the average American?
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Kevin Pimentel of Walnut High School has won a $12,000 college scholarship awarded to children of employees of United States Borax & Chemical Corp. Kevin, 17, plans to study philosophy at UC Berkeley. He received perfect scores on advanced placement tests in calculus and U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Richard Winton and Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
The shooting rampage, carjacking and kidnapping involving a Downey family had its roots in a Craigslist ad the family had placed in an attempt to sell their Chevy Camaro, prosecutors said Monday. Authorities allege that the gunman responded to the ad, and for reasons that are still unclear, opened fire in a bizarre series of crimes that began at the family's business and ended at their home. Prosecutors charged a parolee Monday with multiple counts of capital murder, attempted murder, carjacking and kidnapping.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicky Blair's, an upscale West Hollywood restaurant with a star-studded clientele, has been slapped with a federal lawsuit alleging sex discrimination against female employees. The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the suit Monday on behalf of three women, two of whom still work as cocktail waitresses at the restaurant frequented by such Hollywood luminaries as Sylvester Stallone and George Burns.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | Times researcher Kevin Fox
The United States continues to hold its lead as the No. 1 industrial powerhouse in the world, based on a survey of 1990 annual sales, the latest year for which complete figures are available. But American companies don't fare nearly as well on productivity, a key measure of economic health. THE WORLD'S TOP 500: WHERE THEY ARE No. of Sales Profits on Country Companies (in billions) Employees Sales United States 164 1,839.7 9,405,628 4.2% Japan 111 949.2 3,073,427 2.6 Germany 30 444.4 2,899,631 2.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been seven years since Valerie Rae Green's first lesson in the politics of parental leave. A secretary at a small law office in Santa Ana at the time, she ran out of maternity leave a scant three weeks after her child was born. She asked for an extension. Her boss balked. Her doctor insisted. She ended up losing her job. "It was supposed to have been one of the happiest times of my life," she recalled, "but I was miserable."
NEWS
May 26, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Among many white South Africans, the move in the United States toward divestment and the adoption of other sanctions against the government here is regarded as the first step toward a long-feared black revolution. Blacks see such sanctions neither as their salvation nor as a threat to what little they have now. Political activists welcome the international pressure for change but doubt that it will bring a quick end to the system of apartheid, strict racial separation.
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