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Employer Sanctions

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NEWS
December 7, 1986
These are the some of penalities established by the new immigration law: Hiring--Employers cannot legally hire illegal aliens after Nov. 6, 1986. Employers also must comply with paper work requirements for all employees hired after that date. Necessary forms, however, are not yet available, and there will be no enforcement of this section of the law until June 1, 1987. For one year after that date, violators will receive a warning for the first offense.
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WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. government has blacklisted more Mexican individuals and companies this year than any other single country or group — and that includes North Korea, Iran, Syria and Al Qaeda. Three hundred Mexicans and 180 Mexican companies are on the so-called kingpin designation list, the Treasury Department's roster of people and entities suspected of laundering money for drug traffickers or working for them in other capacities. U.S. banks, companies and people are barred from doing business with them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997
Re "More Border Patrols, Yes, but Labor Issue Remains Key," editorial, Aug. 27: At a time that existing immigration laws are not being effectively enforced, an outside audit has found that the INS is not in compliance with federal law, and virtually all of the public sector (voter registration, law enforcement, education, welfare, emergency services, public health, etc.) makes no legal status/citizenship determination (often by statutory exemption), your call for increased sanctions on the private sector is at the very least premature.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court is nearly ready to take up a challenge to a strict Arizona immigration law — not the new measure that authorizes the police to arrest suspected illegal immigrants, but an earlier law that would punish employers who knowingly hire them. All the court needs now is for the Obama administration and its solicitor general, Elena Kagan, to weigh in. The case may provide a preview of the how the high court will rule eventually on the new law. And it could offer a glimpse of how Kagan — a possible nominee for the Supreme Court — views this contested subject.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
Stopping just short of advocating that employers break the law by hiring illegal aliens, the nation's Roman Catholic bishops Thursday committed their church to stepping up its opposition to so-called "employer sanctions" imposed by the 1986 federal Immigration Reform and Control Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite opposition from a vocal minority who briefly disrupted the NAACP's national convention, the civil rights group Wednesday approved a resolution calling for a repeal of penalties against employers who hire illegal immigrant workers. The vote gives a major boost to the drive to abolish employer sanctions and helps salve wounds that have developed in the relationship between the NAACP and Latino groups.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
With a Senate panel's passage of a last-ditch amendment this week, an effort to postpone the employer sanctions in the new immigration reform law is gathering steam, supporters said Friday. The campaign is being spearheaded by Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.), who complained in an interview that many businesses contacted "said they didn't know anything about the sanctions," which are scheduled to go into effect June 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1987 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer
The last time immigration agent Edward Smyth showed up at the Pico Rivera offices of the California Box Co., he was not a welcome guest. During a November, 1985, raid on the plant, Smyth and fellow Immigration and Naturalization Service investigators herded off 20 illegal alien workers so quickly that one of the owners, John Widera, later complained that his box-stamping machines were left running unattended.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Proposed rules for implementing employer sanctions and the granting of legal status for aliens under the landmark immigration law "have serious weaknesses," a coalition of 28 interest groups has charged. In written comments submitted to the Immigration and Naturalization Service last week and in interviews Monday, the coalition criticized various proposed regulations as unclear, difficult to comply with and unfair to the illegal immigrants who will apply for legal status beginning May 5.
OPINION
June 2, 2005
Re "Employers of Illegal Immigrants Face Little Risk of Penalty," May 29: If we want to reduce illegal immigration, we must sanction the entire spectrum of illegal employers, from the multinational CEO who knowingly contracts with a supplier of undocumented janitors to the middle-class family that hires undocumented cleaners, gardeners and nannies. Supply-side solutions never work: As long as a demand exists, the supply will rise up to meet it. Prohibition proved that. Employers demand cheap, disposable workers, and so the supply comes.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court Thursday refused to block a controversial Arizona law that shuts down businesses for knowingly hiring illegal immigrants. The action by the three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco clears the way for the statute to be enforced beginning Saturday. In a brief order, the judges said that business and immigrant rights groups had not shown an adequate need for delaying enforcement of the law. After the measure went into effect Jan. 1, county prosecutors said they would not file any cases until March 1 to allow the courts time to decide whether to issue the injunction.
OPINION
May 2, 2007
Re "Migratory truths," editorial, May 1 This editorial appears to wish a repeat of the disastrous consequences of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. After granting amnesty to the 2.7 million illegal immigrants then living in the U.S., the enforcement aspects of that act were ignored because of the lobbying of business and ethnic groups, resulting in the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants now here. To reward people who knowingly and willingly broke our laws to come here will only provide an even greater incentive for millions more to follow.
OPINION
June 2, 2005
Re "Employers of Illegal Immigrants Face Little Risk of Penalty," May 29: If we want to reduce illegal immigration, we must sanction the entire spectrum of illegal employers, from the multinational CEO who knowingly contracts with a supplier of undocumented janitors to the middle-class family that hires undocumented cleaners, gardeners and nannies. Supply-side solutions never work: As long as a demand exists, the supply will rise up to meet it. Prohibition proved that. Employers demand cheap, disposable workers, and so the supply comes.
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employer sanctions, touted 15 years ago as the nation's key tool for stemming illegal immigration, failed in practice, offering a cautionary tale as the nation once more focuses on the issue of undocumented workers. Without fanfare, the Immigration and Naturalization Service has slashed its work site enforcement efforts in recent years, resulting in a dramatic drop--as much as 97% over two years--in arrests of workers and fines and warnings issued to employers, government records show.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an indication of the dramatic demographic change sweeping U.S. labor, support is building within the AFL-CIO for a new amnesty and an end to sanctions against employers who hire undocumented workers.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen years after employers were made legally responsible for knowing the immigration status of their workers, the agency charged with enforcing the law concedes it has made mistakes and needs to work harder at building relationships with business owners.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights refused Thursday to throw its support behind a movement for repeal of employer sanctions and agreed instead to appoint a task force to study the matter. Leaders of Latino groups had threatened before Thursday's meeting to withdraw from the coalition if its executive committee failed to join their efforts to overturn the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The law provides penalties for employers who hire illegal aliens.
NEWS
April 25, 1985 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
California Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles) said Wednesday that Latino groups do not like a plan for limited sanctions on employers of illegal aliens and that he will reintroduce a bill from last year that provides for no penalties against such employers. At the same time, he expressed disappointment that a trial proposal he had made to limit sanctions--which he termed a "conciliatory effort"--had failed to stimulate Sen. Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) and Rep. Romano L. Mazzoli (D-Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997
Re "More Border Patrols, Yes, but Labor Issue Remains Key," editorial, Aug. 27: At a time that existing immigration laws are not being effectively enforced, an outside audit has found that the INS is not in compliance with federal law, and virtually all of the public sector (voter registration, law enforcement, education, welfare, emergency services, public health, etc.) makes no legal status/citizenship determination (often by statutory exemption), your call for increased sanctions on the private sector is at the very least premature.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Gallo Giro is the envy of many businesses in Southern California--and not because of the lines at the cash registers or the quality of the tamales. In five minutes flat, Olivia L. Garcia-Patino, human resources director of the fast-food chain, is able to check a batch of immigration work permits by using a device that can tell immediately if the card numbers match those in the government's computers.
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