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NEWS
July 4, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite broad improvements in unemployment, crime and poverty in recent years, the Los Angeles area has slipped further behind the nation in one important measure of economic stability: the health insurance coverage rate of its work force. Fewer than 60% of workers in Los Angeles County have medical coverage through their jobs, new studies show. That is the lowest among major U.S. metropolitan areas.
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NEWS
July 4, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite broad improvements in unemployment, crime and poverty in recent years, the Los Angeles area has slipped further behind the nation in one important measure of economic stability: the health insurance coverage rate of its work force. Fewer than 60% of workers in Los Angeles County have medical coverage through their jobs, new studies show. That is the lowest among major U.S. metropolitan areas.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the growing sense that the economic recoveries in California and Los Angeles County have packed more punch than initially believed, officials on Friday unveiled revised employment figures showing an improved job picture for 1994. The state enjoyed a modest but welcome gain of as many as 148,200 jobs last year. The previous official numbers--based on a relatively small sampling--portrayed California's job total as virtually unchanged.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the growing sense that the economic recoveries in California and Los Angeles County have packed more punch than initially believed, officials on Friday unveiled revised employment figures showing an improved job picture for 1994. The state enjoyed a modest but welcome gain of as many as 148,200 jobs last year. The previous official numbers--based on a relatively small sampling--portrayed California's job total as virtually unchanged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1985 | PAUL FELDMAN and ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writers
Deputy district attorneys will be dispatched immediately to the scene of industrial deaths to determine whether criminal charges--including manslaughter or, in rare instances, second-degree murder--should be filed against employers, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-fifth of California's employers expect to add office workers in the first half of 1992, down slightly from 1991 and the lowest level in seven years, a survey suggests. The survey conducted for the Irvine-based Thomas Temporaries employment agency also found that 13% of the state's employers plan to cut their office staffs in early 1992, roughly in line with what the poll projected a year ago for early 1991.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the biggest employers in Los Angeles County, trying to fill out their job rolls at a time when unemployment rates continue to shrink, are targeting a segment of the population usually underrepresented in the work force: the elderly, disabled, veterans, welfare moms, rehabilitated drug addicts and others known as "people with special needs." As the county's unemployment rate hovers around 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1988 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Gail Davis, a registered nurse, used to have a tough time taking care of her 2-year-old toddler while holding down a full-time position at County-USC Medical Center. But Davis, a staff member in the hospital's respiratory unit, said she is now breathing easier.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
California's powerful insurance lobby has quietly scuttled an effort to combat fraudulent medical billing that drains hundreds of millions of dollars from the state's workers' compensation insurance system. At issue was a proposal aimed at preventing billing scams backed by a task force of public and private employers, including Los Angeles County and Walt Disney Co. It would have required insurers to send notices to injured workers to check whether they actually received all medical services billed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1990 | BOB BAKER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a job market teeming with unemployed workers, the Immigration and Naturalization Service permitted a City of Commerce garment factory to import 16 workers from China this spring despite objections from federal labor officials, union leaders and U.S. consular representatives in China. Winnie Fashions, which imported the women under a temporary guest-worker section of federal immigration law, claimed that it could not find local workers skilled enough to sew Army shirts for a Pentagon contract.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By mid-morning, Barry Sacks already was steaming. A merchandise manager for a big department store chain--a major customer for Sacks' dress company--was on the line, demanding a price concession. She got a quick reply. "No! No! No! No! " said Sacks, his temper barely in check. "You can't get one penny more!" Cocked back in his chair with a phone jammed against his ear, Sacks hammered away: "I'm only a manufacturer, I don't create the market. You're being unreasonable.
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