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BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez and Marc Lifsher
Panicked Californians inundated the state's unemployment agency with 20 times the normal volume of phone calls after a botched computer upgrade delayed jobless checks and crippled parts of the department's website. Call attempts surged after the Labor Day launch of a new system to process ongoing benefits claims. At its peak, nearly 6 million calls were made in just one week. The crush of calls was so heavy that people had to dial an average of 40 times just to get through to a recorded message.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | David Lazarus
Suzanne Dinatale lost her job as sales manager for a biotech company in July. She applied almost immediately for unemployment benefits to help cushion the blow. Dinatale, 41, of Manhattan Beach, said she had no problem receiving the forms she needed to get the ball rolling with California's Employment Development Department. "After that, nothing," she told me. "I called them and got hung up on. I sent emails that got no responses. " Dinatale is now dipping into her retirement savings to get by. "This is the first time I've ever needed unemployment," she said.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
Obamacare may be in the spotlight, but an estimated 16 million California employees are facing healthcare decisions of their own - at work. Like most other Americans, a majority of Californians get their insurance through their employers. Although they may be among the least affected by the Affordable Care Act, a flood of news about the new law has left many workers befuddled about their own coverage. Adding to the confusion is that this is the season when employers are asking workers to re-enroll in company health plans for 2014 and to pick among a variety of healthcare options.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | Chad Terhune
Workers faced with forfeiting unused money in their flexible spending accounts for healthcare expenses may be getting some relief under a new federal rule. The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service changed the use-it-or-lose-it rule for flexible spending arrangements, or FSAs, to allow account holders to carry over as much as $500 from one year to the next without penalty. Many workers have been reluctant to put money into the plans for fear of losing whatever they don't use, resulting in long-standing complaints about how the pretax FSAs work.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Workers faced with forfeiting unused money in their flexible spending accounts for healthcare expenses may be getting some relief under a new federal rule. The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service changed the use-it-or-lose-it rule for flexible spending arrangements, or FSAs, to allow account holders to carry over as much as $500 from one year to the next without penalty. Many workers have been reluctant to put money into the plans for fear of losing whatever they don't use, resulting in long-standing complaints about how the pretax FSAs work.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
In response to longstanding complaints, federal officials said they will allow workers to carry over some unused money held in flexible spending accounts for healthcare expenses. The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service announced the change Thursday on the "use-or-lose" rule for these flexible spending arrangements, or FSAs. The agencies said this move permits employers to allow people to carry over up to $500 of their unused healthcare balances remaining at the end of a plan year, which is usually Dec. 31. It's up to employers whether they make the change and when they take advantage of the new policy.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - The job market weakened in September amid a slowdown in key growth engines such as healthcare and leisure - a worrisome sign given that the employment picture probably worsened this month with the partial federal government shutdown. Employers last month added a modest 148,000 net new jobs, the Labor Department said Tuesday. That was down from an upwardly revised job growth of 193,000 in August, and well below analysts' forecasts for about 180,000 new jobs in September.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Among the proposals coming from House Republicans this morning to end the shutdown/debt limit standoff is a modified version of the Vitter amendment. I identified this measure Monday as one of the four stupidest proposals to end the crisis.  It's been tweaked since then, but it's still dumb. In fact, it may now be the No. 1 stupidest idea.  The original Vitter amendment, as proposed by Sen. David Vitter, R-Louisiana, would have forbade the government to cover any part of the health insurance premiums for members of Congress and their staff.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Fewer than one in six of the world's workers feel engaged on the job, hurting productivity and costing employers billions of dollars a year, according to a Gallup report. The vast majority of people employed in 142 countries said they are either "not engaged" or are "actively disengaged" at work, meaning they are emotionally disconnected and less likely to help their employers make money. Actively disengaged workers outnumber engaged workers at a nearly 2-1 ratio, Gallup said.
SPORTS
October 7, 2013 | By Gary Klein
It did not take long for unpredictable plot twists to appear in USC's coaching search. During a Monday morning appearance on "The Dan Patrick Show," former NFL coach Tony Dungy said he had been contacted regarding the USC job but that he had no interest. When Patrick asked Dungy whether USC had called him, Dungy said, "They haven't, but as they say, representatives of the organization have called. Your people called my people just to see if you're interested. " On Monday afternoon, the school announced that "individuals posing as USC representatives made overtures to two coaches regarding the Trojans' head coaching position.
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