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February 10, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a bruising contest for a major mass transit job. On one side was a foreign company long on experience. On the other, a scrappy American newcomer seeking to win the contract by offering a lower price and more local jobs. Sound familiar? It should. The scrappy newcomer was Morrison-Knudsen Corp., the Boise, Ida., company that provoked an uproar in Los Angeles by charging that transit officials were shortchanging American workers by hiring Japanese-owned Sumitomo Corp.
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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday extolled a substantial drop in the nation's welfare rolls, even as some Democratic critics and policy analysts complained that onetime welfare families are still suffering. The White House issued statistics showing that 6.7 million fewer people received welfare benefits last March than at the start of Clinton's first term, a drop of 48%; California saw a 25% decline, from 2.4 million to 1.8 million.
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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Tuesday extolled a substantial drop in the nation's welfare rolls, even as some Democratic critics and policy analysts complained that onetime welfare families are still suffering. The White House issued statistics showing that 6.7 million fewer people received welfare benefits last March than at the start of Clinton's first term, a drop of 48%; California saw a 25% decline, from 2.4 million to 1.8 million.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a bruising contest for a major mass transit job. On one side was a foreign company long on experience. On the other, a scrappy American newcomer seeking to win the contract by offering a lower price and more local jobs. Sound familiar? It should. The scrappy newcomer was Morrison-Knudsen Corp., the Boise, Ida., company that provoked an uproar in Los Angeles by charging that transit officials were shortchanging American workers by hiring Japanese-owned Sumitomo Corp.
SPORTS
July 25, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN
The remarkable resurgence of the San Diego Padres in the National League West may have drawn attention from a similar comeback by the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League East. Nine games under .500 on June 12, the Blue Jays began a weekend series against the Chicago White Sox threatening to overtake the Boston Red Sox for the AL wild-card lead while challenging the New York Yankees for the division lead.
SPORTS
August 9, 1987 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
Your newest inductee into the Ex-Dodger Hall of Fame once said: "At the top of my game, I could be the most dominating force in baseball"--and then had to beg for a major league tryout a year later. This would be the same guy who couldn't find happiness unless he tripped over it, who once punched a manager, screamed at another, found his way onto a police blotter. This would be Dave Stewart, back from more tribulations than you can shake a melodrama at.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not long ago that many Los Angeles police officers liked to describe their department with a litany of bests--a rhapsody that was likely to include best paid. But after 15 months with no contract and two years without a pay raise, LAPD officers now are more likely to rail about how good everybody else has it. In reality, there is a bit of truth in both the old and the new images of compensation within the Los Angeles Police Department.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old men paused as they filed past Junior Wells' coffin and glanced at the bluesman's final show of splendor: his creaseless sky-blue silk suit and matching homburg, a shiny trove of harmonicas laid out beside him, a pint of gin nestled nearby to ease his journey home. The 63-year-old musician had been "Junior" all his adult life, and now that the youthful peacock was gone, the mourners knew their own time was coming.
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