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Employment East Germany

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NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand East Germans applied for the first benefits their government has ever given the unemployed, whose ranks may swell dramatically as the nation moves toward capitalism. At the moment, East Germany has a severe labor shortage because skilled workers continue to leave for West Germany. But industrial production has slowed, and the nation is threatened with financial collapse.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
A reunified Germany is facing the formidable task of absorbing millions of inefficient, underemployed and unemployed East Germans and rebuilding the tattered economy of the East. We may wish our former enemy well, but West Germany's present economic power, augmented by a revitalized East Germany, along with the power of our other former foe, Japan, will mean more trouble for American workers on the industrial battlefronts of the world.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
A reunified Germany is facing the formidable task of absorbing millions of inefficient, underemployed and unemployed East Germans and rebuilding the tattered economy of the East. We may wish our former enemy well, but West Germany's present economic power, augmented by a revitalized East Germany, along with the power of our other former foe, Japan, will mean more trouble for American workers on the industrial battlefronts of the world.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an hour after official closing time for the town's only bank, yet 14 weary souls waited quietly in the cheap fluorescent glare as the lone teller labored on. In calmer times, everyone here would have long since been home, the bank's manager, Martina Bengsch, admitted, and she would occasionally see her infant daughter before she went to sleep. But for East Germany, these are not calm times.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an hour after official closing time for the town's only bank, yet 14 weary souls waited quietly in the cheap fluorescent glare as the lone teller labored on. In calmer times, everyone here would have long since been home, the bank's manager, Martina Bengsch, admitted, and she would occasionally see her infant daughter before she went to sleep. But for East Germany, these are not calm times.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was drafted into the East Germany army, Sven Haselman might have half-wondered if he would spend his 18 months in the service learning how to maneuver tanks or one of the big green troop carriers that trundle down the autobahn. Instead, the 19-year-old soldier is learning to operate a streetcar so he can ferry rush-hour commuters in the industrial city of Magdeburg, about a two-hour drive southwest of Berlin.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1990 | GEORGE L. PERRY, GEORGE L. PERRY is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution research organization in Washington
In the 1960s, the world marveled at the German "economic miracle" as the West German economy came back from the rubble of World War II to become the economic superpower of Europe. Now, with the end of the Cold War and the promise of German reunification, the world looks for an encore as East Germany is pulled up to parity with its brother to the west.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand East Germans applied for the first benefits their government has ever given the unemployed, whose ranks may swell dramatically as the nation moves toward capitalism. At the moment, East Germany has a severe labor shortage because skilled workers continue to leave for West Germany. But industrial production has slowed, and the nation is threatened with financial collapse.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was drafted into the East Germany army, Sven Haselman might have half-wondered if he would spend his 18 months in the service learning how to maneuver tanks or one of the big green troop carriers that trundle down the autobahn. Instead, the 19-year-old soldier is learning to operate a streetcar so he can ferry rush-hour commuters in the industrial city of Magdeburg, about a two-hour drive southwest of Berlin.
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