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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1988
On May 2, The Times published an article entitled "Sanctions Fail to Cut Alien Jobs" (Part I). That article contains a quotation, attributed to me, which gives the reader an impression which is contrary to what I said to the author. In the interview, the author made a statement to me that many employers assumed that most documents presented for employment eligibility by Latinos were not genuine. I responded that I could not automatically assume that documents were not genuine--unless (somewhat facetiously)
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OPINION
June 28, 2013
Re "Why a border surge?," Opinion, June 26 Robert C. Bonner's suggestions that it would be better and cheaper to boost immigration enforcement by targeting employers is absolutely on target. Most illegal immigrants in the U.S. came here to get a job. If corporate executives knew they would face severe punishments if they employed illegal immigrants, the word would quickly come down to all not to take any chances when hiring. Perhaps this would result in somewhat higher prices for fruits and vegetables, but we would be saving billions on border security, healthcare, public education and more.
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OPINION
June 28, 2013
Re "Why a border surge?," Opinion, June 26 Robert C. Bonner's suggestions that it would be better and cheaper to boost immigration enforcement by targeting employers is absolutely on target. Most illegal immigrants in the U.S. came here to get a job. If corporate executives knew they would face severe punishments if they employed illegal immigrants, the word would quickly come down to all not to take any chances when hiring. Perhaps this would result in somewhat higher prices for fruits and vegetables, but we would be saving billions on border security, healthcare, public education and more.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Q: I am a dentist and entrepreneur interested in setting up an independent video production. I would like to use a famous character in my production, but I'm not sure how to get copyright permission to use it. Whom should I contact? Would the cost be prohibitive? --Roger Freeman, Beverly Hills * A: You first need to contact the owner of the trademarked character or the copyrighted material, ask for permission and then hope for the best.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Q: I am a dentist and entrepreneur interested in setting up an independent video production. I would like to use a famous character in my production, but I'm not sure how to get copyright permission to use it. Whom should I contact? Would the cost be prohibitive? --Roger Freeman, Beverly Hills * A: You first need to contact the owner of the trademarked character or the copyrighted material, ask for permission and then hope for the best.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | DOUG SMITH
The daily search for work takes starkly different forms at two not-very-distant spots on East Broadway in Glendale. One is visible, provocative and, consequently, high in public consciousness. The other is drab, unassuming and virtually unknown. The first, in spite of its high profile, has no name. It's the corner of Broadway and Jackson Street where men stand, often from early morning to early afternoon, waiting to jump into the truck or car of a contractor or homeowner seeking casual labor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to attract more qualified applicants, including minorities, Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block on Wednesday announced liberalized hiring standards for the department that include accepting non-U.S. citizens and lowering the minimum age from 21 to 20. Block said the changes were part of an aggressive effort to increase the size of the Sheriff's Department over the next four years from 7,000 deputies to about 9,000.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Bell thought he followed all the rules. He told the workers in his packaging factory, most of whom are Latino, to get their papers in order to show they were entitled to hold jobs in this country. He helped some employees pay for their amnesty applications. And, he filled out pages and pages of government-issued forms. All this to comply, Bell says, with landmark immigration legislation that makes it a crime to hire illegal or undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
June 30, 1987
Some documents that establish identity and employment eligibility: Above, Certificate of U.S. Citizenship (N-560) and Certificate of Naturalization (N-550 or N-570); at right, U.S. passport; at far right, Arrival-Departure Record (I-94); Alien Registration Receipt Card (I-151) issued before 1978, commonly known as a "green card"; a current Alien Registration Receipt Card and a Conditional Alien Registration Receipt Card.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of state businesses has launched a campaign to try to convince the public that a new law that prohibits the hiring of illegal immigrants will devastate the state's economy. The group known as Wake Up Arizona! is considering a ballot initiative to combat the state's efforts to crack down on illegal hiring. Gov. Janet Napolitano signed the employer sanctions law two weeks ago.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Bell thought he followed all the rules. He told the workers in his packaging factory, most of whom are Latino, to get their papers in order to show they were entitled to hold jobs in this country. He helped some employees pay for their amnesty applications. And, he filled out pages and pages of government-issued forms. All this to comply, Bell says, with landmark immigration legislation that makes it a crime to hire illegal or undocumented immigrants.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | DOUG SMITH
The daily search for work takes starkly different forms at two not-very-distant spots on East Broadway in Glendale. One is visible, provocative and, consequently, high in public consciousness. The other is drab, unassuming and virtually unknown. The first, in spite of its high profile, has no name. It's the corner of Broadway and Jackson Street where men stand, often from early morning to early afternoon, waiting to jump into the truck or car of a contractor or homeowner seeking casual labor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to attract more qualified applicants, including minorities, Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block on Wednesday announced liberalized hiring standards for the department that include accepting non-U.S. citizens and lowering the minimum age from 21 to 20. Block said the changes were part of an aggressive effort to increase the size of the Sheriff's Department over the next four years from 7,000 deputies to about 9,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1988
On May 2, The Times published an article entitled "Sanctions Fail to Cut Alien Jobs" (Part I). That article contains a quotation, attributed to me, which gives the reader an impression which is contrary to what I said to the author. In the interview, the author made a statement to me that many employers assumed that most documents presented for employment eligibility by Latinos were not genuine. I responded that I could not automatically assume that documents were not genuine--unless (somewhat facetiously)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1993 | JULIE FIELDS
One month after an audit by the U.S. Border Patrol uncovered 62 illegal aliens working at the Holiday Inn in Ventura, a manager at the hotel has been targeted for falsifying his own paperwork. Patricio Partida, 31, who has supervised the hotel's banquet service for three years, is being fined $1,000 for claiming U.S. citizenship on an employment eligibility form. He is actually a citizen of Mexico.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, legal business reporter
It's OK to ask job applicants--citizens and noncitizens alike--to show that they are eligible to work in the United States. Demanding too much information, however, can cost a company dearly. Just ask Aztec Finishing Inc., a subsidiary of Azteca Productions. This week, the Commerce-based garment company agreed to pay more than $27,000 because it demanded that a prospective employee produce more proof than the law required. The applicant, identified only as a Latino, will receive $5,000.
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