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NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening an international conference on unemployment at a "historic, important and long-overdue moment," President Clinton on Monday called on the world's leading industrial democracies to embrace the technological changes that are shaking their economies. At the same time, the President tried to counter growing concerns that the improvement in workplace productivity fueled by those technological advances must lead to layoffs.
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NEWS
March 17, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Canada, the government is poised to unveil an "internship" program as part of an $800-million initiative to help high school graduates find a home in the workplace. In Britain, a program dubbed ReStart aims to offer workers training and job placement soon after they are laid off, rather than when their jobless benefits run out years later.
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NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For President Clinton, bringing the world to the Rust Belt to talk about jobs Monday represented a risky gambit to transplant his liberal Democratic domestic agenda into the rarefied air of the international economic arena. For the first time, Clinton sought to turn over an entire summit of Western industrialized nations to a debate on one specific economic problem that is normally the preserve of domestic politics--joblessness.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials from the leading industrial democracies completed their first jobs conference Tuesday, agreeing on the need to improve education, training and worker skills to combat unemployment but failing to bridge a crucial gap between the United States and Europe.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Official figures released last week confirmed what most western European political leaders already knew: Unemployment in the region, already alarmingly high, had jumped again.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials from the leading industrial democracies completed their first jobs conference Tuesday, agreeing on the need to improve education, training and worker skills to combat unemployment but failing to bridge a crucial gap between the United States and Europe.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly a year ago that President Clinton and his senior advisers began kicking around the idea of hosting an international conference to figure out why high unemployment rates seemed to have become a fact of life in the world's industrialized nations. The phrase "jobless recovery" was in vogue among American economists, who were trying to explain why the U.S. economy was bouncing back from recession but the number of working Americans was not.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Canada, the government is poised to unveil an "internship" program as part of an $800-million initiative to help high school graduates find a home in the workplace. In Britain, a program dubbed ReStart aims to offer workers training and job placement soon after they are laid off, rather than when their jobless benefits run out years later.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Torrance is one of the lucky ones. A 24-year veteran of the Hoover vacuum cleaner plant in a gritty industrial suburb of Glasgow, Torrance will still have a job next year--but only because his union was forced in January to make substantial contract concessions so that Hoover would not close the plant. Workers at the Hoover plant near Dijon, France, never had that chance.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening an international conference on unemployment at a "historic, important and long-overdue moment," President Clinton on Monday called on the world's leading industrial democracies to embrace the technological changes that are shaking their economies. At the same time, the President tried to counter growing concerns that the improvement in workplace productivity fueled by those technological advances must lead to layoffs.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For President Clinton, bringing the world to the Rust Belt to talk about jobs Monday represented a risky gambit to transplant his liberal Democratic domestic agenda into the rarefied air of the international economic arena. For the first time, Clinton sought to turn over an entire summit of Western industrialized nations to a debate on one specific economic problem that is normally the preserve of domestic politics--joblessness.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1994 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Official figures released last week confirmed what most western European political leaders already knew: Unemployment in the region, already alarmingly high, had jumped again.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly a year ago that President Clinton and his senior advisers began kicking around the idea of hosting an international conference to figure out why high unemployment rates seemed to have become a fact of life in the world's industrialized nations. The phrase "jobless recovery" was in vogue among American economists, who were trying to explain why the U.S. economy was bouncing back from recession but the number of working Americans was not.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Torrance is one of the lucky ones. A 24-year veteran of the Hoover vacuum cleaner plant in a gritty industrial suburb of Glasgow, Torrance will still have a job next year--but only because his union was forced in January to make substantial contract concessions so that Hoover would not close the plant. Workers at the Hoover plant near Dijon, France, never had that chance.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1997
I'm usually in pretty close agreement with James Flanigan. However, I think he has overlooked some factors with regard to the euro ("Understanding All the Changes Europe's New Euro Can Buy," June 1). Not mentioned is one of the major benefits to U.S. companies doing business overseas: a more stable exchange rate. Although there may be initial consequences for the dollar in terms of valuation versus this new currency, each member country remains a sovereign and, as such, continues to have its own treasury.
WORLD
October 30, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
The European Union's executive branch on Wednesday approved a far-reaching new policy that would fundamentally alter the way that tens of thousands of chemical compounds are regulated by government and tested by industry. If adopted by the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers, the REACH policy -- Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals -- will be the world's most comprehensive regulation governing the use of chemicals.
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