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NEWS
February 28, 1991
U.S. companies with contracts to snuff out hundreds of oil well fires in postwar Kuwait are being deluged with telephone calls from THOUSANDS OF JOB APPLICANTS. But most of the companies aren't hiring; the teams have been formed for months. Red Adair Co., perhaps the best known of the firms, has taken about 4,000 calls a day this week.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was born and raised in Kuwait. He married here, had two children and has toiled for more than 10 years at the same cake plant, where he worked his way up to marketing manager. But Ahmed, whose parents came from Palestine nearly half a century ago, cannot vote and cannot own real estate in Kuwait. He is not a citizen by Kuwaiti law and has no chance of ever becoming one--nor do his children. And he is fed up. "This . . . place, these people. I give everything--everything!"
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BUSINESS
March 7, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a shelf behind George Fischer's desk is a recent Christmas card from a Saudi Arabian friend: It shows Santa Claus wearing a gas mask. Fischer has friends all over the world, most with less macabre senses of humor. His contacts come from 40 years of gathering information for a newsletter about overseas work contracts. Now job-seekers from seemingly everywhere want to be Fischer's friend.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of oil rigs and refineries that had become his home in Iraq, Gene Lovas grew accustomed to on-the-job hazards. Now, as Lovas prepares to leave his family to return to work in the region where he had been a hostage at the U.S. Embassy until just three months ago, he adds mine fields, environmental perils and the constant threat of renewed violence to the list. Still, Lovas, a construction superintendent from Westminster, downplays the risk.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1991 | TOM FURLONG and DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He was born and raised in Kuwait. He married here, had two children and has toiled for more than 10 years at the same cake plant, where he worked his way up to marketing manager. But Ahmed, whose parents came from Palestine nearly half a century ago, cannot vote and cannot own real estate in Kuwait. He is not a citizen by Kuwaiti law and has no chance of ever becoming one--nor do his children. And he is fed up. "This . . . place, these people. I give everything--everything!"
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of oil rigs and refineries that had become his home in Iraq, Gene Lovas grew accustomed to on-the-job hazards. Now, as Lovas prepares to leave his family to return to work in the region where he had been a hostage at the U.S. Embassy until just three months ago, he adds mine fields, environmental perils and the constant threat of renewed violence to the list. Still, Lovas, a construction superintendent from Westminster, downplays the risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Carl P. Malone applied to become the public works director of Hermosa Beach last year, he had a rock solid excuse for leaving his previous job. After all, how could he stay in a position directing development projects in Kuwait with Iraqi troops rolling across the border? "He said he had a couple of hours to get his things, grab a ride and get out," Acting City Manager Steve Wisniewski said. "As the tanks were rolling in on one end, he was rolling out on the other."
BUSINESS
March 7, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a shelf behind George Fischer's desk is a recent Christmas card from a Saudi Arabian friend: It shows Santa Claus wearing a gas mask. Fischer has friends all over the world, most with less macabre senses of humor. His contacts come from 40 years of gathering information for a newsletter about overseas work contracts. Now job-seekers from seemingly everywhere want to be Fischer's friend.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
U.S. companies with contracts to snuff out hundreds of oil well fires in postwar Kuwait are being deluged with telephone calls from THOUSANDS OF JOB APPLICANTS. But most of the companies aren't hiring; the teams have been formed for months. Red Adair Co., perhaps the best known of the firms, has taken about 4,000 calls a day this week.
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