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BUSINESS
October 31, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time, a broad coalition of government agencies and business and labor groups have united to carry out an ambitious plan to keep companies and jobs in Los Angeles County. "It's time that we ended this state of denial that we have a problem in California. We do have a problem," said Gary Conley, president of the Economic Development Corp. of Los Angeles County, a private, nonprofit organization heading the coalition.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2011 | By Tom Petruno and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
He was cast as the epitome of Wall Street greed, but in the end a jury sided with star money manager Jeffrey Gundlach's claim that he wasn't paid enough. In a bitter court battle that pitted Gundlach against his longtime employer, Los Angeles investment giant TCW Group Inc., jurors delivered verdicts Friday that left both sides claiming victory. The panel largely agreed with TCW's side of the case, yet ordered the firm to write a $67-million check to Gundlach and three lieutenants for back pay, while TCW's own demand for damages was denied.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1998 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of Southern California garment makers shifting production to Mexico has risen dramatically in the last couple of years, as even the region's most entrenched firms have reacted to the state's sharply increased minimum wage and other competitive pressures. But so far the movement of sewing work to Latin America has not dealt a crushing blow to the region's apparel industry, as some people predicted it would and as it has in other garment strongholds on the East Coast and in Texas.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn on Tuesday named a director of economic recovery to implement a broad plan to lift the troubled local economy in the wake of the terrorist attacks. The plan, crafted over the last few weeks by a panel of business, labor and community leaders, calls for boosting the economy by accelerating public works projects and launching a marketing campaign to bolster the devastated travel and tourism sector.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting the increased momentum in California's economic expansion, employers in the state added a hefty 41,300 jobs in March, trimming the unemployment rate to 6.5% from a revised 6.6% in February, officials reported Friday. The report, by the state Employment Development Department, says California has now created more than 1 million jobs since the depth of the recession in April 1993. March's job gains were spread throughout the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Assemblyman Carl Washington announced Tuesday the formation of a community task force to ensure that the $2.4-billion Alameda Corridor project fulfills its promise to hire and train people who live in the economically depressed cities along the corridor's route. The number of jobs created by the new rail link to the county's ports and who gets hired to fill them have been major concerns for many residents and leaders from Wilmington to central Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A voice in the wilderness was calling out for help. "I wanted to get away from everything that was happening," said 17-year-old Charles Locke, whose Los Angeles neighborhood was ravaged by fire and looting during the riots. A voice from a different kind of wilderness answered. It invited Locke and 18 other inner-city teen-agers to spend the summer working in a rugged mountain canyon 50 miles from downtown Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bring badly needed jobs to their area's residents, religious leaders and black-owned contractors from southern Los Angeles have banded together to pressure damaged businesses to award the contractors post-riot construction work. More than two dozen black-owned contractors have formed a corporation, called United Minority Contractors, seeking to boost their chances to receive potentially lucrative post-riot construction work.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn on Tuesday named a director of economic recovery to implement a broad plan to lift the troubled local economy in the wake of the terrorist attacks. The plan, crafted over the last few weeks by a panel of business, labor and community leaders, calls for boosting the economy by accelerating public works projects and launching a marketing campaign to bolster the devastated travel and tourism sector.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
Danny Bakewell's message on my voice mail was demanding, a summons from a man who won't take no for an answer. You have a moral obligation, he said, to write about African-Americans being denied work on riot reconstruction jobs in black neighborhoods. Moral obligation? Isn't that what they teach in divinity school? The concept went against everything I'd ever learned in the newspaper business.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate executives who leap to Internet start-ups in search of the big stock payoff increasingly are taking home fat paychecks too. Competition for experienced managers is pushing up salaries at new-media firms in Los Angeles, where a pile of potentially valuable stock options is no longer enough to attract top talent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley economy is poised for continued growth this year, but nagging problems of traffic, education and land use must be addressed to prevent business defections to outlying suburbs, economist Jack Kyser said Thursday. Kyser, chief economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., predicted a 2.3% increase in the number of jobs in the Valley region this year, contrasted with 2.4% in 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Riordan administration has grossly overstated its accomplishments in creating and retaining jobs in Los Angeles, according to an outside review of its work. The administration's business team, begun by Riordan as an arm of the mayor's office designed to attract, retain and help expand businesses in the city, has told the City Council and the news media that it has had an impact on businesses that represents about 315,000 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL
The midday sun was boring down like a hot iron, and Jose Azbar and his friends still hadn't landed jobs. Many had arrived at daybreak. They were fed up, angry, their hopes dashed for finding jale--Spanish slang for work. "This place is a good idea, a good concept, but right now it's costing us time and money," Azbar, 36, complained as friends nodded in agreement. "For most of us, if we don't work, we don't eat, our families don't eat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by the prospect that Los Angeles may gain thousands of high-paying jobs, the City Council on Wednesday approved $35 million in tax credits for the massive Playa Vista commercial development, which includes the proposed DreamWorks SKG film studio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1999
A self-help information center geared toward college scholarship applicants and job seekers is scheduled to open today. Named after Sylvia Thomas, City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas' late grandmother, the resource center will feature computers equipped with a reference library with access to a social service directory and literacy programs, said Sylvia Castillo, associate director of the Community Coalition, a South-Central nonprofit organization.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate executives who leap to Internet start-ups in search of the big stock payoff increasingly are taking home fat paychecks too. Competition for experienced managers is pushing up salaries at new-media firms in Los Angeles, where a pile of potentially valuable stock options is no longer enough to attract top talent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Riordan administration has grossly overstated its accomplishments in creating and retaining jobs in Los Angeles, according to an outside review of its work. The administration's business team, begun by Riordan as an arm of the mayor's office designed to attract, retain and help expand businesses in the city, has told the City Council and the news media that it has had an impact on businesses that represents about 315,000 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Assemblyman Carl Washington announced Tuesday the formation of a community task force to ensure that the $2.4-billion Alameda Corridor project fulfills its promise to hire and train people who live in the economically depressed cities along the corridor's route. The number of jobs created by the new rail link to the county's ports and who gets hired to fill them have been major concerns for many residents and leaders from Wilmington to central Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agency in charge of building the $2.4-billion Alameda Corridor has overstated the number of full-time jobs that will be created during construction of the new rail link to the county's fast-growing ports, a new federal report said Wednesday. Officials of the U.S. Department of Transportation also concluded that the employment figures used by the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority to promote the costly public works project are "subject to gross misinterpretation" by the public.
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