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NEWS
August 11, 1999 | JOHN BALZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vast majority of African American high school students believe that if they work hard, they will have more opportunities, according to a report released Tuesday by a nonprofit educational group. A majority of students surveyed voiced optimism in the old-fashioned ideal that a diligent work ethic reaps success. But the figure was significantly higher among black students.
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NEWS
August 11, 1999 | JOHN BALZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vast majority of African American high school students believe that if they work hard, they will have more opportunities, according to a report released Tuesday by a nonprofit educational group. A majority of students surveyed voiced optimism in the old-fashioned ideal that a diligent work ethic reaps success. But the figure was significantly higher among black students.
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NEWS
September 12, 1995 | PATRICK LEE and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 1982, an African American aerospace engineer named Carl E. James decided that the only way to create opportunities for minorities and women in this historically white and male industry was to strike out on his own. By 1994, his Cal Tron Systems Inc. of Carson, an assembler of electronic military aircraft components, had annual sales of about $2 million and 26 employees--half of them female and four out of five minorities. "When we hire a new person . . .
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | PATRICK LEE and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 1982, an African American aerospace engineer named Carl E. James decided that the only way to create opportunities for minorities and women in this historically white and male industry was to strike out on his own. By 1994, his Cal Tron Systems Inc. of Carson, an assembler of electronic military aircraft components, had annual sales of about $2 million and 26 employees--half of them female and four out of five minorities. "When we hire a new person . . .
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happened about 15 years ago, but Joel Dreyfuss can still remember the day a newsroom executive at the Washington Post walked up to him and asked where she could find "other blacks as good as Joel Dreyfuss." Dreyfuss, now an associate editor at Fortune magazine, was a reporter at the Post then and he replied: "Well, you have whites here who aren't as good as me. Hire blacks as good as them." Dreyfuss was outraged, but his experience is not uncommon.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Agriculture Department, which has one of the worst minority employment records in the government, on Tuesday issued a five-year affirmative action plan for hiring and promoting minorities and women. Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said the goal is "to increase the employment of minorities and women in occupations and (pay) grades where they are under-represented, compared to the civilian labor force." The plan, covering the fiscal year that began last Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991 | MAIA DAVIS
The Moorpark Unified School District may have to solicit a fourth round of bids for construction of a new alternative high school building, possibly delaying the expected Sept. 1, 1992, completion date, a school district official said. The school board had planned to vote last week on contracting with Los Angeles-based Roman & Associates to build the new home for Moorpark Community High School at 3900 Condor Drive.
OPINION
September 27, 1998
In "Reducing 'Big L.A.' to Size" (Opinion, Sept. 20), Joel Kotkin endorses a developer who gains union support on one project by allowing unions to organize another project. This sort of thing should not be endorsed. It is a payoff in the purest sense. Elsewhere in the article, he champions developers who have political skills. Whatever happened to the notion that politics and payoffs are bad? Whatever happened to the idea that projects should succeed or fail based on their ability to attract workers, customers and investors and their willingness pay taxes consistent with their use of public resources?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990
Those of us in California who care about the fair employment of minorities and women are outraged by President Bush's veto of the civil rights bill, and by California Sen. Pete Wilson's initial vote against this landmark legislation and his decisive support for the President's veto. We are living in tough economic and spiritual times. Unfortunately, bigotry finds a fertile breeding ground in such a climate. The presidential veto, and Sen. Wilson's crucial vote to uphold that veto, sends a clear message that intolerance is again acceptable.
NEWS
January 25, 1985 | --Compiled by Jerry Gillam,\f7 Times Staff Writer
Bills Introduced: Drunk: AB 331 by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sepulveda) would make it a misdemeanor punishable by a minimum of 48 hours in jail for a motorist to refuse to take a chemical sobriety test. Smoking: AB 369 by Assemblywoman Marian W. La Follette (R-Northridge) would prohibit smoking in public transportation ticket lines and require half of the waiting rooms to be posted as nonsmoking areas.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happened about 15 years ago, but Joel Dreyfuss can still remember the day a newsroom executive at the Washington Post walked up to him and asked where she could find "other blacks as good as Joel Dreyfuss." Dreyfuss, now an associate editor at Fortune magazine, was a reporter at the Post then and he replied: "Well, you have whites here who aren't as good as me. Hire blacks as good as them." Dreyfuss was outraged, but his experience is not uncommon.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | United Press International
A dispute among Cabinet members over repealing a 20-year-old affirmative action order is on the way toward resolution, with mandatory hiring goals replaced by voluntary goals, it was reported Saturday. White House spokesman Rusty Brashear said efforts may be under way to settle the dispute between Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III and Labor Secretary William E. Brock III, but the White House "is not involved in that story," the New York Times reported.
OPINION
May 16, 1993
Economic empowerment. That's the key. Without it, residents of inner cities will continue to be at the mercy of those banks and financial service companies whose lending practices have long discriminated against African-Americans, Latinos and other minorities. Time and again surveys have shown that minority applicants in the inner city have been denied credit much more frequently than white counterparts with similar incomes and credit backgrounds.
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