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July 29, 1991
"E s un gran sacrificio"-- it is a great sacrifice -- to be here, away from her husband and two daughters, Gloria Henriquez says. She left her home in a suburb of San Salvador because her family, like many others in a country wracked by war, was desperate. She and her husband had heard that women can get work more easily than men in Southern California. So they agreed that Gloria would come here for a while to earn money.
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NEWS
July 29, 1991
"E s un gran sacrificio"-- it is a great sacrifice -- to be here, away from her husband and two daughters, Gloria Henriquez says. She left her home in a suburb of San Salvador because her family, like many others in a country wracked by war, was desperate. She and her husband had heard that women can get work more easily than men in Southern California. So they agreed that Gloria would come here for a while to earn money.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wall Street Is Hiring Again: Wall Street firms hired nearly 6,000 new workers in the second quarter, the first substantial increase since the 1987 stock market crash sent the industry into recession. The Securities Industry Assn. said employment at New York Stock Exchange member firms rose to 214,925 at the end of June, a 2.8% increase for the year.
SPORTS
May 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Dick Motta, criticized for considering jobs with the New York Knicks and the Clippers, resigned Wednesday as coach of the Dallas Mavericks. He did not say if he will go to another National Basketball Assn. team. The announcement came at a news conference in which Motta was expected to say whether he would take a job with the Knicks or stay in Dallas for an eighth season. "I cannot apologize for any of my actions or quotes," he said.
SPORTS
August 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
Baseball umpires were warned Friday that they will be fired if they strike next week. American League president Gene Budig and National League president Len Coleman sent the warning in a memo dated Aug. 25 that many umpires received before they worked Friday night's games. Some of the umpires backing union head Richie Phillips have talked about striking over baseball's refusal to allow 22 umpires to withdraw their resignations, which are effective Thursday.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Wall Street has been slashing jobs, kicking out traders and bankers as the finance industry shrinks. But those with high-paying jobs are still taking in fat bonuses. The average cash bonus on Wall Street last year rose an estimated 9% to nearly $121,900, according to a report released Tuesday by New York state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Overall, the New York securities industry is expected to dole out $20 billion in 2012 cash bonuses, up 8% from the previous year.
OPINION
May 22, 1994 | David Friedman, David Friedman, director of the New Economy Project, writes frequently on regional and technology issues
In 1970, more than 90,000 people were working in high-tech jobs inside Boston's Route 128. In California's Silicon Valley, 60,000 were so employed. Twenty years later, Silicon Valley's employment exploded to 265,000, while Route 128 grew to just 150,000. Furthermore, in 1990, 39 of the 100 fastest-growing electronics firms in the country called Silicon Valley home; only four were headquartered in Route 128.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | DICK ACKERMAN, Assemblyman Dick Ackerman (R-Fullerton) represents the 72nd District, covering Anaheim Hills, Brea, Fullerton, La Habra, Placentia and Yorba Linda
The current welfare system is in need of reform. Republicans and Democrats alike agree. Congress and the president affirmed this by placing the states in charge of their own welfare programs. In its 70-year history, the system has incurred enormous costs, sending the federal and state governments drastically over budget. It has woven a crippling cycle of dependency through generations of families. The consensus is that encouraging people to work will remedy these problems.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of sharp bickering, officials agreed on a bleak $29-billion budget Sunday that will reduce services and downgrade the quality of life in New York City. The agreement between Mayor David N. Dinkins and the City Council, which flexed fiscal muscles after it received new city charter powers, came just hours before the deadline for the start of the new fiscal year. The budget contains pain for 10,000 city workers who will be laid off.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
Bonuses at Wall Street firms jumped 17% last year, showing how quickly the industry had rebounded from the financial crisis, New York state's top economic office reported Tuesday. Although investment banks have responded to public anger over compensation by reducing the pay of some high-profile executives, the new figures suggest that, for other employees, bonuses are rising. At three leading firms -- Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase & Co. -- compensation in 2009 rose 31% from 2008, averaging $340,000 per employee, the state comptroller's office said.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1987 | JOHN TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
A national recession that will depress Orange County's economy appears inevitable, a panel of Southern California economic authorities agreed Thursday, but the timing of its arrival and the extent of its impact are uncertain. A newly issued report by the Center for Economic Research at Chapman College, meanwhile, predicts that employment growth, the principal measure of Orange County's economic activity, will drop sharply in the first half of 1988.
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