Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmployment Non Discrimination Act
IN THE NEWS

Employment Non Discrimination Act

BUSINESS
January 5, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: How can I minimize returns to my retail website after the holidays? Answer: Make sure your sales page includes product details and a toll-free customer service line. "The easier it is for customers to speak to a real human being, the less likely they are" to return merchandise or resort to a credit card "chargeback," said Brien Heideman of BadCustomer.com. Customers sometimes use chargebacks -- disputing credit card charges and demanding repayment -- if retailers don't have a clear return policy.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 21, 2010
The Senate's vote to allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the U.S. military is an occasion for looking both backward and forward ? backward to the long struggle by gay activists to put equality on the national agenda and forward to the campaign to prohibit discrimination on other fronts. In the past year, attention has focused on the role of political and military leaders in repealing the demeaning "don't ask, don't tell" policy, enacted in 1993. Indeed, it's hard to overstate the historical significance of the congressional hearing in February at which Adm. Michael G. Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, endorsed repeal.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON -- A Senate committee approved a bill Wednesday prohibiting workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, just two weeks after the Supreme Court handed down rulings expanding protections for married same-sex couples. Three Republicans -- Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Orrin Hatch of Utah and Mark Kirk of Illinois -- voted for the bill, which passed 15 to 7. The Republican support gave the perennial bill some hope of passage in the Senate, though its prospects in the House are less certain.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
As Congress begins to deliberate overhauling the nation's immigration policy, several California Republicans are being eyed as persuadable targets by those supporting legalization for the millions of people who entered the country illegally or overstayed their visas. Reps. Gary Miller of Diamond Bar, Howard “Buck” McKeon of Santa Clarita, and Jeff Denham and David Valadao of the Central Valley are frequently named as potential supporters of a comprehensive immigration package, in part because of the make-up of their districts.
OPINION
April 29, 2004 | Brad Sears and Alan Hirsch, Brad Sears is executive director of the UCLA School of Law's Williams Project on Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy. Alan Hirsch is a senior consultant to the project.
Here's the latest Republican spin on homosexuality: Hate gay marriages but love gays. In his State of the Union address, President Bush noted that "the same moral tradition that defines marriage also teaches that each individual has dignity and value in God's sight."
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Jon Healey
At the risk of sounding like a troll, have social conservatives replaced "homosexual teachers" with "transgendered teachers" as their scare tactic of choice? I have to concede right up front that I haven't been paying close attention to the news releases that the Traditional Values Coalition sends out. Nevertheless, the one the group released Wednesday struck me as a new wrinkle on a familiar theme. " Traditional Values Coalition is running awareness campaigns in 7 states to inform voters which candidates for U.S. Senate support putting transgender teachers in the classroom ," the release declares (emphasis in the original)
OPINION
July 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The federal Fair Housing Act was passed 45 years ago, just one week after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Initially the law prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin or religion. Over the decades, it has been amended to include protection from discrimination on the basis of gender or disability or whether there are children in the household. Now it's time to amend the law again to prohibit bias based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Currently, the law does not set aside as a protected class people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered.
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Michael Sam's brave stand," Editorial, Feb. 11 It seems most members of the millennial generation honestly don't care whether their friends are gay or straight; I know my own kids don't. I hope that All-American defensive lineman Michael Sam's courage is rewarded by other young NFL players saying "so what. " I also hope that, as when the military ended "don't ask, don't tell," America looks back in a year and wonders what all the fuss was about. The NFL's acceptance of Sam would put another nail in the coffin of discrimination against LGBT Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996
Only a few days ago, it looked as if the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) would be able to move through the Senate and on to the White House for President Clinton's expected signature. Supporters of ENDA, which explicitly prohibited job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, pointed to polls strongly supporting their cause.
OPINION
December 24, 2007
Among the business Congress left unfinished in its stampede toward a Christmas recess were two initiatives to deal with the continuing reality of bias against gays and lesbians. One, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, would prohibit bias in the workplace on the basis of sexual orientation. The House has passed the bill; all that is required is Senate concurrence.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|