Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmployment Northwestern United States
IN THE NEWS

Employment Northwestern United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the talk of economic boom times, a new study of four Northwest states suggests that about one-half of the available jobs do not pay a living wage to single adults and that the news is even worse for single parents with two children. The findings, based on 1996 employment data, show that Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana are not creating enough living wage jobs for working age adults.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the talk of economic boom times, a new study of four Northwest states suggests that about one-half of the available jobs do not pay a living wage to single adults and that the news is even worse for single parents with two children. The findings, based on 1996 employment data, show that Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana are not creating enough living wage jobs for working age adults.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timber worker Dennis Mumey breathed a little easier Tuesday, but is unsure whether anything can resuscitate the industry that has sustained his family for generations in the seemingly endless forests of the Cascade Mountains. Federal officials Tuesday unveiled an interim plan whose goal is to protect the northern spotted owl but preserve most lumber jobs--at least for now.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government's proposal to protect the northern spotted owl would cost the Pacific Northwest about 40,000 jobs in timbering and related industries by 1995, Fish and Wildlife Service economists said Monday. The estimated loss would be 57% more than earlier projections. Logging on the Northwest's federal lands would fall to less than one-fifth of historic levels, and the region's timber-related employment would drop to 13,259 jobs, according to the analysis.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government's proposal to protect the northern spotted owl would cost the Pacific Northwest about 40,000 jobs in timbering and related industries by 1995, Fish and Wildlife Service economists said Monday. The estimated loss would be 57% more than earlier projections. Logging on the Northwest's federal lands would fall to less than one-fifth of historic levels, and the region's timber-related employment would drop to 13,259 jobs, according to the analysis.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
At the moment, Harry Earnest is a veteran millwright at a profitable sawmill. Soon, however, he will be an unemployed, 59-year-old man trying to find a way to support his invalid wife and a daughter in college. "This could hurt real bad," he mused, sizing up Louisiana-Pacific's plans to mothball its mill south of Red Bluff--and cut Earnest's job--this spring. "It could take my life savings just to get by." Other people in other towns face the same future.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever is mine is mine, and whatever is yours is half mine. Welcome to America's Mideast, here in the Northwest. Here in the land of the angry and the scared, the right and the righteous. Under the exaggerated shadow of what the nation has come to know as the cute but delicate spotted owl, in the wary gaze of wealthy Pacific Rim neighbor Japan, amid enchanted glades of soaring cedars and measured rhythms of still-liveable cities, the Pacific Northwest is at war with itself.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever is mine is mine, and whatever is yours is half mine. Welcome to America's Mideast, here in the Northwest. Here in the land of the angry and the scared, the right and the righteous. Under the exaggerated shadow of what the nation has come to know as the cute but delicate spotted owl, in the wary gaze of wealthy Pacific Rim neighbor Japan, amid enchanted glades of soaring cedars and measured rhythms of still-liveable cities, the Pacific Northwest is at war with itself.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timber worker Dennis Mumey breathed a little easier Tuesday, but is unsure whether anything can resuscitate the industry that has sustained his family for generations in the seemingly endless forests of the Cascade Mountains. Federal officials Tuesday unveiled an interim plan whose goal is to protect the northern spotted owl but preserve most lumber jobs--at least for now.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
At the moment, Harry Earnest is a veteran millwright at a profitable sawmill. Soon, however, he will be an unemployed, 59-year-old man trying to find a way to support his invalid wife and a daughter in college. "This could hurt real bad," he mused, sizing up Louisiana-Pacific's plans to mothball its mill south of Red Bluff--and cut Earnest's job--this spring. "It could take my life savings just to get by." Other people in other towns face the same future.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|