Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmployment Orange County
IN THE NEWS

Employment Orange County

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 23, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heck with sugarplums. Visions of employees are dancing in the heads of merchants now that the holiday shopping season is about to begin. With an unemployment rate that consistently hovers around 3%--or what amounts to full employment in the county--the search for workers here has never been easy sledding. But with merchants facing the annual jingle of cash registers, the problem becomes even more acute.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer, Pfeifer is a Times staff writer.
Hoping to avoid layoffs amid a steep downturn in tax revenue, the largest union for government employees in Orange County proposed Friday that workers take unpaid time off during the holidays -- a move one union official said could save the county as much as $20 million. Nick Berardino, general manager of the Orange County Employees Assn., which represents a majority of the county's more than 17,000 workers, called on employees to take one to five days off without pay between Dec. 22 and Jan. 4.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Shrinking Payrolls: Meanwhile, high tech certainly wasn't a hot spot in Orange County during the past month. Employment at Orange County's high-tech companies fell 5.3% in September compared to a year ago, according to a monthly study by CorpTech, a Woburn, Mass.-based research firm. Among 145 firms surveyed, 36 employers reported that they expanded during the past year while 42 reported their payrolls shrank, resulting in a net loss of 440 jobs compared to a year earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Good morning, sir! Good morning, sir!" yelled the 60 men in near-unison as the driver of a black pickup pulled up to the Costa Mesa Job Center. Sitting on a metal chair and bundled up against the morning cold, each man leaned forward and raised a number--given out in the order the workers signed up--on a blue piece of paper. It was 7 a.m., and the contractor needed a handyman for six hours at $10 per hour. But the job required an English speaker; all but a few hands dropped.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Employment Levels: Orange County's small technology companies continued to cut employment during June, according to a survey by CorpTech, a market research company based in Woburn, Mass. The Orange County firms surveyed by CorpTech had 7,528 people on their payrolls in June, 575 fewer than a year earlier, a 7.1% decline. By comparison, a survey of small technology firms nationwide showed that companies cut employment by only a tenth of a percentage point last month.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Is there any sign of life in Orange County's moribund high-tech economy? There might be, according to figures provided by CorpTech Information Services, a research company in Woburn, Mass. Employment at Orange County's small high-tech companies grew by 404 jobs, or 3%, during the year that ended Aug. 10, according to a CorpTech poll of 213 high-tech firms in the region. The county's growth rate compared to a 1.8% growth in high-tech jobs across the nation during the same period.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though a summer wave of recent college and high school graduates pushed Orange County's jobless rate up to 6.6% for July, economists said the increase masked continued strength in three key sectors of the local economy. Unemployment in the county rose by nearly a full percentage point from 5.8% for June as the Class of '94 began its job search. But the increase "is what economists like to call an anomaly in the data," said Anil Puri, head of the economics department at Cal State Fullerton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1999 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year into welfare reform, Orange County has made significant gains in moving recipients off public assistance and into jobs, according to the latest figures released by the Social Services Agency. Officials attributed the success in large part to the county's booming economy, which has supplied plenty of jobs for welfare recipients to take. But it remains unclear how the groundbreaking welfare-to-work program will fare this year when the local economy is expected to slow down.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1991
Despite a seasonal hiring spurt in March that boosted total employment in Orange County by 0.3% for the month, the total number of jobs in the county shrank slightly from a year earlier, state employment officials said Thursday. The decline of 0.8%, led by steep drops in construction and manufacturing employment, marked the second consecutive month that the year-to-year job tally for the county dropped. The last time such a drop occurred was in 1983.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Just back from vacation in October, Gil Banfill played the messages on his telephone answering machine. A woman from his employer's personnel office asked what he wanted to do about his pension fund. Banfill, 53, returned her call and learned that the Irvine computer memory disk plant where he worked had been closed the previous week. After 5 years with Xidex Corp., his job was gone. Three months after the plant closing, Banfill is still making the rounds of prospective employers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | H.G. REZA and OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"Good morning, sir. Good morning, sir," yelled the 60 men in unison as the driver of a black pickup pulled up to the Costa Mesa Job Center. Sitting on metal chairs and bundled up against the morning cold, the men leaned forward and raised their numbers--given out in the order the workers signed up--on blue pieces of paper. It was 7 a.m., and the contractor needed a handyman for six hours at $10 an hour. But the job required an English speaker; all but a few hands dropped.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite early signs of a slowing national economy, California's strong job growth pushed into October as the unemployment rate dippedto 4.7% and employers statewide added a hefty 39,500 jobs, state officials said Monday. Unemployment in Orange County edged down to 2.3%, near its historical low. That compared with 2.5% in September and 2.6% in October 1999. Retailers, services and government in the county all bulked up last month, although some of that may have reflected seasonal hiring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Raul Ovidio Paez and fellow day laborers gathered Friday outside a building-supply store on West Slauson Avenue in Los Angeles, the issue seemed obvious: Why should police chase down job-seekers when there is serious crime to respond to? "We're just looking for jobs; we're not committing any crimes," Paez, a 30-year-old native of El Salvador, said as he and others waited for chamba (work) from passing motorists outside the HomeBase store in Ladera Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuters streaming into Orange County from Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties will see the day's "rush hour" swell from four to seven hours over the next two decades, according to a regional transportation study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuters streaming into Orange County from Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties will see the daily rush hour swell from four to seven hours over the next two decades as demand for new employees outstrips the county's ability to house them, according to a new regional transportation study.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California employers bucked the national hiring slowdown in February and added 40,200 workers, reducing the state's jobless rate to a 30-year low of 4.6%. The employment report released by state officials Friday reflects how California's economic recovery continues to catch up with the record national business expansion.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of steady growth, Orange County's manufacturers have entered a slowdown as the slumping Asian economy begins to take its toll, an industry survey revealed Monday. Jobs in manufacturing--still vital to the county's economy despite their shrinking percentage of the whole--could drop this year for the first time since the recession of 1991-92, said Chapman University economist Raymond Sfeir, who conducts a quarterly local manufacturing outlook survey.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big job gains across a broad spectrum of California industries helped drive down the state unemployment rate sharply in January to 4.7%, a 30-year low, officials reported Friday. Orange County unemployment remained well below the state average, despite rising slightly to 2.5% in January, up from a revised rate of 2.2% in December. Economists attributed the local uptick to seasonal factors, rather than a change in the county's tight job market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
A job center for day laborers opens Wednesday, but critics prefer the doors remain shut. Some worry that the center will turn into a city-sponsored tax dodge and a haven for illegal immigrants, while the workers themselves predict bringing them together in one place will create tussles over who gets what kind of work. The taxpayers will definitely be exploited, said City Councilman Dave Sullivan, the only council member who opposed the project, which was approved in August 1998. Lt.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|