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Employment Quotas

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NEWS
September 14, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Pete Wilson's search for voters took him Thursday to the din of Grand Central Market, where, as television cameras jostled for position, the Republican candidate for governor donned a white apron over his suit pants and served up a little fun. Actually, he served up pig hearts, almost 2 1/2 pounds of pig hearts, wrapped them in white butcher paper and presented them to a middle-aged woman who looked somewhat confounded by the fuss over her order.
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NEWS
September 14, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Pete Wilson's search for voters took him Thursday to the din of Grand Central Market, where, as television cameras jostled for position, the Republican candidate for governor donned a white apron over his suit pants and served up a little fun. Actually, he served up pig hearts, almost 2 1/2 pounds of pig hearts, wrapped them in white butcher paper and presented them to a middle-aged woman who looked somewhat confounded by the fuss over her order.
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NEWS
March 7, 1985 | United Press International
Rep. Parren J. Mitchell (D-Md.) Wednesday accused Civil Rights Commission Chairman Clarence M. Pendleton Jr. of being a Reagan Administration "lackey" for condemning affirmative action as "immoral" and calling black leaders racist. Mitchell, who is black, walked out of a civil rights commission hearing on affirmative action after making a short statement protesting a speech Tuesday in which Pendleton criticized many civil rights supporters as "racists." Pendleton also is black.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From United Press International
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, in a sharp break with its conservative recent past, Thursday announced its endorsement of pending civil rights legislation. "More, not less, needs to be done to provide redress to victims of employment discrimination and to reduce the amount of discrimination in employment," it said.
NEWS
February 8, 1985 | Associated Press
The Reagan Administration's chief civil rights enforcement officer predicted today that the nation may soon "put behind us for good" court-ordered mandatory hiring quotas based on race and sex. In a speech to labor and employment committees of the Florida Bar Assn., Assistant Atty. Gen. William Bradford Reynolds said he believes that America is ready, instead, to choose a civil rights course "that is blind to color differences."
NEWS
March 29, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's civil rights chief Friday listed more than 50 cases in which he contends companies were forced to meet rigid and discriminatory employment quotas to achieve affirmative action goals. Assistant Atty. Gen. William Bradford Reynolds said that the examples support Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III's contention in January that there is "a litany" of cases in which employment "goals and timetables were actually used as subterfuges for quotas."
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration's civil rights enforcement was attacked Thursday by a conservative Republican congressman, who denounced it as a "tower of Babel," and three House panel chairmen, who accused Assistant Atty. Gen. William Bradford Reynolds of misrepresenting facts about affirmative action. Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1985 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. Justice Department recommendation that Los Angeles end the use of racial employment quotas in its police and fire departments will have no effect on hiring policies, city officials said Wednesday. In a letter sent to the city in January and released by the Justice Department Tuesday, department officials cited a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last June.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
In a meeting punctuated by shouting and name calling, the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday delivered what could be a fatal blow to President Reagan's attempt to promote his civil rights chief, William Bradford Reynolds, to the Justice Department's No. 3 post.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without a magnifying glass, it might be hard to see who paid for the TV commercial attacking Republican Pete Wilson for dishonesty. The crumb-sized picture of Democrat Dianne Feinstein, identifying her as the ad's sponsor, appears for only three seconds, fills just 0.8% of the screen and is hidden against the background of a newspaper. But don't cry for Wilson. His gubernatorial campaign ad attacking Feinstein for allegedly favoring employment quotas is only slightly easier to identify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | SHAWN STEEL and PATRICK MANSHARDT, Shawn Steel is an attorney in Beverly Hills and treasurer of the California Republican Party. Patrick Manshardt is a staff attorney with the Individual Rights Foundation, a law project of the Los Angeles-based Center for the Study of Popular Culture
The State Bar of California was humiliated this month when Janice Rogers Brown, the first female African American nominee to the California Supreme Court, was unanimously confirmed by the state's three-member Commission on Judicial Appointments. The confirmation occurred despite a roundly criticized, politically motivated rating of "unqualified" by the state bar's Judicial Nominees Evaluations ("Jenny") Commission.
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