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Employment South Africa

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BUSINESS
August 5, 1987
The Sullivan principles call for U.S. companies doing business in South Africa to: Ensure non-segregation of the races in all work facilities. Implement equal and fair employment practices for all workers. Develop training programs that will prepare nonwhites for supervisory, administrative, clerical and technical jobs. Increase the number of nonwhites in management and supervisory positions.
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BUSINESS
July 5, 1989 | From the Washington Post
In an agreement described as establishing a model for future disinvestment from South Africa, Mobil Oil Corp. has agreed to pay $2.3 million to compensate its black workers for the company's exit from the country. The deal, which ends a bitter, two-month dispute between Mobil and the black Chemical Workers Industrial Union, works out to a payment of $716 for each worker, or one month's salary, whichever is greater.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | CECILIE DITLEV-SIMONSEN, Times Staff Writer
Early last year, conservative students at picturesque Dartmouth College disturbed the peaceful atmosphere of the New Hampshire campus by swinging sledgehammers to destroy a shantytown erected by campus protesters opposed to the school's investments in companies doing business in South Africa.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987
The Sullivan principles call for U.S. companies doing business in South Africa to: Ensure non-segregation of the races in all work facilities. Implement equal and fair employment practices for all workers. Develop training programs that will prepare nonwhites for supervisory, administrative, clerical and technical jobs. Increase the number of nonwhites in management and supervisory positions.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1989 | From the Washington Post
In an agreement described as establishing a model for future disinvestment from South Africa, Mobil Oil Corp. has agreed to pay $2.3 million to compensate its black workers for the company's exit from the country. The deal, which ends a bitter, two-month dispute between Mobil and the black Chemical Workers Industrial Union, works out to a payment of $716 for each worker, or one month's salary, whichever is greater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1988 | HERMANN GILIOMEE, Hermann Giliomee is a professor of political studies at the University of Cape Town
In South Africa, as elsewhere, people yearn for politics that produce clear-cut results. Elections must produce undisputed winners and losers. Governments should give a clear direction to society. If a weak government cannot be defeated in an election, a coup d'etat or a revolution must perform drastic surgery. In real life, things never work out that way. Politics is a tortuous process that is full of contradictions. It moves at a far slower pace than the great majority had imagined.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | CECILIE DITLEV-SIMONSEN, Times Staff Writer
Early last year, conservative students at picturesque Dartmouth College disturbed the peaceful atmosphere of the New Hampshire campus by swinging sledgehammers to destroy a shantytown erected by campus protesters opposed to the school's investments in companies doing business in South Africa.
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