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Employment United States

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NEWS
June 17, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A breaching whale on the sea of American demographics, the baby boom generation shocked its elders early on. They rocked out with Elvis, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. As teen-agers and young adults, they turned to civil rights, the women's movement and anti-war protests, launching an entire fashion industry of rainbow-hued hippie clothes in the process.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surging unemployment is generating a relative wealth of job applicants for retailers that have struggled in recent years to find employees for the holiday season. But the stalled economy also is prompting retailers to move cautiously on seasonal hiring, a development that bodes poorly for recently laid-off workers. The Sears, Roebuck & Co.
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NEWS
October 15, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Pavao knows that somewhere in the huge American workplace, the North American Free Trade Agreement has wreaked havoc. "But for me," he says, "it's only good that has come out of it"--a steady job paying $9.31 an hour, plus health insurance, for dispatching tractor-trailers filled with upholstery fabric to Mexico. Now look 864 miles west to Fredonia, Wis., where Marvin Windsor, a 25-year veteran of assembly-line work, lost his $40,000-a-year job 15 months ago when the Square D Co.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2001 | Reuters
The number of Americans seeking initial unemployment benefits jumped by 33,000 to 385,000 in the week ended Aug. 4, up from a revised 352,000 for the previous week, the Labor Department said. Economists were expecting a smaller increase, to 373,000, for the latest week.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding more combative than conciliatory, President Clinton Wednesday defended the use of public funds for swimming pools in his $16.3-billion stimulus package, noting scornfully that even the U.S. Senate has a pool financed with taxpayer money. Clinton declared that he will fight to save as much of his jobs-creating program as he can, despite solid Republican opposition that blocked pre-Easter approval of his plan in the Senate.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1996
(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC) Sharp Swings Unexpected strength in the U.S. economy, indicated by a huge increase in new jobs, sent bond yields soaring and stocks falling. The markets were reacting to the prospect of higher interst rates, which would reduce corporate profits and discourage investors. WHAT HAPPENED FRIDAY All major indexes lost ground and sensitive interest rates immediately moved higher. * Unemployment: The February jobless rate dropped to 5.5% from 5.8%.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1989 | MELANIE PICKETT
Regents of the University of California vs. Bakke (June 28, 1978): The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the UC Davis Medical School discriminated against Allan Bakke, a white, when it denied him admission to the school, and orders that he be admitted. The medical school's admissions policy, designed to increase the number of minorities in the white-dominated medical profession, set aside 16 of the 100 openings for racial minorities.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of minority groups who have fought together for decades are finding themselves increasingly divided over immigration concerns that threaten to pit black Americans against other ethnic groups, particularly Latinos. Until now the nation's varied minority organizations have managed to smooth over differences to maintain a successful and united front, working most often through the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deriding "fear-mongering" and "ridiculous statements" by opponents of the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Clinton on Wednesday stepped up his own rhetoric, warning that "everything people worried about in the 1980s will get worse" if the pact is voted down.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
David Thurston got into the construction business after realizing he couldn't maintain a steady paycheck as a sculptor. But that move also proved unreliable since the recession put the brakes on many building projects. Now he says the best way to keep food on the table is to work in a kitchen. At 37, Thurston is training to be a chef. The New York City man headed north for lessons on slicing, dicing and mixing at the New England Culinary Institute in Montpelier.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corporate misery spiked in July as U.S. companies, led by the telecommunications and computer sectors, announced plans to cut 205,975 jobs--a 65% increase over June and more than three times as many as a year ago, according to an unofficial survey released Monday. The July total was the highest since the Chicago-based outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas began compiling the data in 1993.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
The number of U.S. workers filing new claims for state unemployment benefits rose last week and more companies announced job cut plans in June as the labor market continues to deteriorate. Initial jobless claims rose by 7,000 to 399,000 in the week that ended Saturday, the Labor Department said. The number of people collecting unemployment benefits rose to 3.03 million during the week ended June 23, the most since November 1992.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be a sharp drop in openings for information technology workers and in the number of IT positions that go unfilled because qualified candidates are unavailable, an industry trade group says. But a report to be released today by the Information Technology Assn. of America also says that IT hiring remains robust and that there will still be a shortage of qualified IT personnel in the months ahead. There are reportedly more than 10 million IT workers in the U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employers added almost twice as many workers as expected in February, keeping the nation's unemployment rate at 4.2% and suggesting that the economy is not in quite as deep a funk as it had seemed. The Labor Department reported Friday that 135,000 new workers landed jobs during the month, down from the 224,000 who got work in January but substantially more than the 75,000 that forecasters had predicted. Some of the job gains were in areas where the economy had shown its greatest weaknesses.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2001 | Reuters
Investors will spend much of the week bracing for a key monthly employment report due Friday that could help clear up the lingering questions about the severity of the U.S. economic slowdown, analysts said. The unemployment rate climbed to 4.2% in January. The U.S. central bank is still widely expected to cut its benchmark short-term interest rate by half a percentage point to 5% at its next meeting March 20 to boost growth by cutting borrowing costs, thus encouraging spending.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A mixed employment report sent the stock market tumbling Friday as investors, fearful about the economy's direction, unloaded technology shares and retreated to the energy and health-care sectors. Analysts said the sell-off reflected Wall Street's worries that the January employment numbers were not weak enough to persuade the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates again before its scheduled meeting in March. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 119.53 points, or 1.1%, to 10,864.10.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Thursday gave the Bush Administration the go-ahead to begin negotiations on a free-trade agreement with Mexico, and the Senate is expected to follow suit today. The 231-192 House vote was a major victory for President Bush, who had lobbied hard to overcome a powerful coalition of opponents that included labor, environmental and consumer groups. "I couldn't be more pleased," Bush told reporters. "The vote was, frankly, larger than I anticipated."
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The number of planned job cuts by U.S. businesses in March tripled from a year earlier, employment firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas said. Businesses announced plans to cut 68,984 jobs last month, up 200% from March 1998 and 11% higher than February. "Job cuts, averaging 75,000 over the last six months, are now in the realm of the figures we saw during the last recession," said John Challenger, chief executive of the employment firm.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's unemployment rate delivered a likely last hurrah in December for the current good times, holding steady at a near three-decade low of 4%. Economists found little comfort in the Labor Department's latest assessment of the country's employment situation issued Friday. The private sector created a mere 49,000 jobs in December, less than half the number of the previous month. There were hints of wage inflation.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000
* The number of Americans filing new applications for state unemployment benefits declined by 18,000 last week to 308,000, the lowest level since early August, the Labor Department said. The four-week moving average of claims, which smooths out week-to-week volatility, also fell last week to 315,750, the lowest level since Aug. 26, when it stood at 313,000. Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors? A guide to the section's staff can be found at: http://www.latimes.
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