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Employment Women

BUSINESS
September 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
Women advanced further in America's corporate hierarchy this last year, chipping away at the "glass ceiling" that has limited their executive aspirations, Working Mother said in a survey released Monday. The magazine's seventh annual survey of the best companies for working mothers also shows that more employers have expanded efforts to enhance the workplace for parents despite the recessionary belt-tightening that has affected many businesses.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1999 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, workplace reporter
The gender pay gap, or the difference between what women earn and what men earn for similar jobs, is smaller in California than in any other state, a study released Wednesday found. Nationwide, women earn about 74 cents for every dollar earned by men doing the same work. In California, women earn about 84 cents for every dollar earned by men, according to the report from the AFL-CIO and the Institute for Women's Policy Research called "Equal Pay for Working Families."
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Meet Charlotte Hampton, a confirmed workaholic. The Newport Beach executive works more than 50 hours every week, including several hours most weekends. When not at the office, she is often thinking about it. To pull down her six-figure salary, she often must travel on long, tiring business trips. Hampton, a single mother, seldom dates. She hasn't seen a serious movie in more than two years. She feels guilty for not having more time to spend with her 5-year-old daughter, Catherine.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Deloitte & Touche in Downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, Stephanie Vandehey spent part of her afternoon interviewing Amy Thomas for a job in an ice cream parlor. "Are you really good at using a cash register?" 9-year-old Stephanie asked. "It's one of my favorite things to do," Amy, 10, replied. Based on that--and the fact that she loves "all flavors of ice cream"--Amy was hired for the job.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Mitzi Ferguson's employer, Archive Corp. of Costa Mesa, bought Cipher Data Products, she dealt with the lawyers on behalf of her office. Daily, on the phone, she represents the company president to its board of directors. She arranges the president's personal and professional schedule and is fluent in several software languages. Ferguson embodies where the secretarial profession is headed--away from production tasks such as filing and taking dictation, and toward information management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Founders of the national Take Your Daughters to Work Day credit the annual event with inspiring the nation's girls to aim for careers in the sciences and the arts. But locally, some school officials say the day is not as popular as it once was. "We get more absences from the flu than from the Take Your Daughters to Work Day," said Jan Martin, secretary at John H.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of Swiss women went on a one-day strike to press their demands for equal opportunities in the workplace. Switzerland, where strikes of any kind are rare, seemed untroubled by the work action. The protest came on the heels of a poll indicating that 60% of Swiss women believe that equality is still only a promise.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
One by one, their voices brimming with rage and sorrow, dozens of California women came forward before a special legislative hearing Thursday to tell of the sexual harassment they have endured at work, sometimes for decades. They were attorneys and hairdressers, high-tech saleswomen and waitresses, a neurosurgeon and a pipefitter.
NEWS
June 30, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The persistent pay gap between women and men extends to the highest levels of corporate America, according to a new study, with women executives on average earning only two-thirds as much as their male counterparts at the nation's largest companies. Still, women have made great strides in top corporations during the last 10 years, the study by the Korn/Ferry International executive search firm and UCLA's John E.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a big moment for a junior executive with ambition. Debra Douglas, an employee of Hyundai's American auto sales subsidiary, was having dinner in Seoul with the company's Korean chairman. Throughout dinner, the chairman asked her only two questions: Did she wash her husband's hands and feet? Did she believe in the equality of men and women?
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