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Employment Women

BUSINESS
March 21, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a big moment for a junior executive with ambition. Debra Douglas, an employee of Hyundai's American auto sales subsidiary, was having dinner in Seoul with the company's Korean chairman. Throughout dinner, the chairman asked her only two questions: Did she wash her husband's hands and feet? Did she believe in the equality of men and women?
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BUSINESS
May 12, 1995 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland--where for 40 years the Jungle Cruise operators have resembled rugged outdoorsmen and the Snow White character has looked like, well, Snow White--has begun tearing down gender barriers for many jobs. In the past month, women have begun taking guests on the circuitous Jungle Cruise, past water-squirting elephants and stalking tigers, on a route where only male guides had ventured before.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1988 | Associated Press
More than three out of four working mothers who responded to a magazine survey said they alone get dinner on the table for the family when they come home from the job. Not only do 77% of the women prepare dinner by themselves, 59% set the table and 64% do the after-dinner cleanup without help, Working Mother magazine says in its February issue. The questions were published in the magazine in April and drew responses from 2,811 women around the country.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside of war, few people have gone through more complete, disorienting change than eastern Germans in the three-plus years since the collapse of the Berlin Wall. From divorce laws to driving rules, from the currency to milk cartons, precious little remains as it once was. Motherhood is no exception. In the past three years, birthrates in the formerly Communist east have plummeted by a staggering 52%.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1990 | RICK GLADSTONE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After nearly three decades of bushwhacking trails for women in the male-dominated workplace, Felice N. Schwartz has spent much of the past year fighting accusations she is a traitor. She hasn't capitulated. On the contrary, the dispute with some influential feminists seems to have sharpened. Schwartz is the founder of a prominent corporate consulting firm in Manhattan called Catalyst, which promotes sexual equality at work and which was spawned during the feminist movement of the early 1960s.
NEWS
January 29, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of American women in management jobs nearly doubled during the 1980s, reflecting their rising status in the U.S. work force, a new Census report says. The Census figures being released today also illustrate the striking deindustrialization of the U.S. economy, with employment flat in blue-collar occupations, such as equipment operators, while expanding swiftly in technical and other white-collar fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in central Illinois, Marilyn McCord Adams always wanted to be a preacher. Her grandfather was a preacher, her cousins, uncles and maiden aunt were preachers. "It was sort of a family business, and when I was a child, that was my ambition," she said. But they were Disciples of Christ, and by the time she emerged from an adolescent phase of atheism, Marilyn Adams was swept up by the liturgical drama of the Episcopal Church.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | From Associated Press
Three professional women scheduled to testify Wednesday before Congress about job discrimination backed out because of negative reactions to testimony by law professor Anita Faye Hill during confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. "This is one of the negatives--three people who are victims who are reluctant to testify," Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.) said in opening the Senate Labor subcommittee hearing.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canon has built brainstorming rooms. Fujitsu has put up office partitions for privacy. Hitachi has cut cumbersome middle management. And Toshiba is turning to women. The ingredients differ, but each company is trying to concoct a recipe for the same thing: more creativity among researchers. Although Japan's private sector has doubled research spending in the past decade, executives say money isn't enough.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notion of what it means to be a family's provider in the United States got a stark update Wednesday with a new study showing that 55% of working women contribute half or more of their household income. Women have moved far beyond the debate about whether they belong in the home or the workplace, according to the study, the most comprehensive look in 14 years at women's views about work, family and society.
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