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Employment Women

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to a consent decree between the city of Los Angeles and its adversaries in a long-running class-action suit alleging widespread harassment and discrimination at the Police Department. The consent decree establishes aggressive hiring goals for women and minorities and requires the department to produce detailed annual reports on the race and gender of candidates for promotion.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was right after Municipal Judge Soussan G. Bruguera revealed that she had once received a death threat and was still sometimes frightened as she sat on the bench that she proposed pushing a special green button to demonstrate the downtown Los Angeles courtroom's security system. "Er, Judge, you might want to wait," advised Pete Moe, the deputy sheriff assigned to the courtroom, "because there's an incident going on right now."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996
The spotlight will shine on five prominent Latinas today at the 20th National Hispanic Women's Conference, a daylong event at the Los Angeles Convention Center in downtown Los Angeles. The event, which is expected to draw more than 6,000 professional and college-age women and high school students, was created to educate Latinas on career development, empowerment and leadership strategies.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | PATRICK LEE and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 1982, an African American aerospace engineer named Carl E. James decided that the only way to create opportunities for minorities and women in this historically white and male industry was to strike out on his own. By 1994, his Cal Tron Systems Inc. of Carson, an assembler of electronic military aircraft components, had annual sales of about $2 million and 26 employees--half of them female and four out of five minorities. "When we hire a new person . . .
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | Associated Press
Artifacts documenting the lives of working women were sealed Friday in a 25-year time capsule at the White House. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton told a mostly female audience that in 25 years the President, "and her husband," will open it. The opportunity to make that remark came as hundreds of working women gathered with President Clinton and his wife in a tent pitched on the South Lawn of the White House to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Labor Department's Women's Bureau.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1995 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland--where for 40 years the Jungle Cruise operators have resembled rugged outdoorsmen and the Snow White character has looked like, well, Snow White--has begun tearing down gender barriers for many jobs. In the past month, women have begun taking guests on the circuitous Jungle Cruise, past water-squirting elephants and stalking tigers, on a route where only male guides had ventured before.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notion of what it means to be a family's provider in the United States got a stark update Wednesday with a new study showing that 55% of working women contribute half or more of their household income. Women have moved far beyond the debate about whether they belong in the home or the workplace, according to the study, the most comprehensive look in 14 years at women's views about work, family and society.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Deloitte & Touche in Downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, Stephanie Vandehey spent part of her afternoon interviewing Amy Thomas for a job in an ice cream parlor. "Are you really good at using a cash register?" 9-year-old Stephanie asked. "It's one of my favorite things to do," Amy, 10, replied. Based on that--and the fact that she loves "all flavors of ice cream"--Amy was hired for the job.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Increasing the supply and quality of child care and promoting fair pay for women were cited Monday as the top priorities of the Clinton Administration's efforts to improve conditions for working women. Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich and Karen Nussbaum, director of the Labor Department's Women's Bureau, formulated an eight-point strategy in response to a survey of 250,000 working women that was released last year.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the toughest job market in years for Japanese college graduates, but Kaneko Komatsu and her friends were still unprepared for the interview questions and comments they received. "Your legs are fat," Komatsu, 19, said she was told by one male recruiter for a travel agency. "If you get cosmetic surgery to make your eyes bigger, we'll hire you," another recruiter told one of her classmates.
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