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Employment Women

BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | Washington Post
One in four women says her workplace poses a health risk, and 8% have left jobs because they were worried about such risks, according to a recent survey. The Women's Health in the Workplace Survey, which involved 1,000 working women, was developed by the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Foundation in Pittsburgh and conducted by the Washington-based research firm Lake Sosin Snell Perry & Associates.
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NEWS
November 24, 1997 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tamisha Jones rolled the dice, picked up the card and pondered the question on it: "Why do women say they work?" At the same time, 150 other teenage girls attending a recent "economic literacy" conference in Los Angeles were considering similar questions as they played An Income of Her Own, a game aimed at inspiring them to think about the world of work before they start playing for keeps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to a consent decree between the city of Los Angeles and its adversaries in a long-running class-action suit alleging widespread harassment and discrimination at the Police Department. The consent decree establishes aggressive hiring goals for women and minorities and requires the department to produce detailed annual reports on the race and gender of candidates for promotion.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People growing up in the '60s got a first look at the advertising business through the TV show "Bewitched." The message was loud and clear: Career advancement in advertising meant having a wife with magical powers. That was OK, unless you were the wife. Judging from the current crop of TV shows, the rules have been rewritten for the grown-up boomers of the 1990s.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was right after Municipal Judge Soussan G. Bruguera revealed that she had once received a death threat and was still sometimes frightened as she sat on the bench that she proposed pushing a special green button to demonstrate the downtown Los Angeles courtroom's security system. "Er, Judge, you might want to wait," advised Pete Moe, the deputy sheriff assigned to the courtroom, "because there's an incident going on right now."
NEWS
April 22, 1996 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emphasizing that jobs of the future will increasingly be technology-related, the sponsors of the annual Take Our Daughters to Work Day program are expanding into cyberspace. The Ms. Foundation for Women, which started the event in 1993 to bolster self-confidence for adolescent girls, has teamed up with America Online for this year's day, set for Thursday. "We like to say the Ms.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she visits home, there are times when Reiko wants to blurt out, "You're wasting your lives." Instead, she listens quietly to her Japanese friends chatter on about their favorite trendy restaurant, their next vacation and their dead-end "office lady" jobs. And she gives thanks, privately of course, that she has a very different blueprint for her future. All it took was moving 6,500 miles away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996
The spotlight will shine on five prominent Latinas today at the 20th National Hispanic Women's Conference, a daylong event at the Los Angeles Convention Center in downtown Los Angeles. The event, which is expected to draw more than 6,000 professional and college-age women and high school students, was created to educate Latinas on career development, empowerment and leadership strategies.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | PATRICK LEE and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 1982, an African American aerospace engineer named Carl E. James decided that the only way to create opportunities for minorities and women in this historically white and male industry was to strike out on his own. By 1994, his Cal Tron Systems Inc. of Carson, an assembler of electronic military aircraft components, had annual sales of about $2 million and 26 employees--half of them female and four out of five minorities. "When we hire a new person . . .
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | Associated Press
Artifacts documenting the lives of working women were sealed Friday in a 25-year time capsule at the White House. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton told a mostly female audience that in 25 years the President, "and her husband," will open it. The opportunity to make that remark came as hundreds of working women gathered with President Clinton and his wife in a tent pitched on the South Lawn of the White House to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Labor Department's Women's Bureau.
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