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BUSINESS
July 10, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's only 3 p.m. but Mariel Devesa, an auditor with Deloitte & Touche, has already knocked off work for the day and is powering her colorful windsurfing board near the Huntington Beach Pier. Most of her colleagues are still poring over spreadsheets in their offices, but thanks to a flexible schedule, Devesa, the U.S. women's windsurfing champion, has completed her eight-hour workday. As she glides past flocks of surfers and sea gulls, the 23-year-old Devesa has her sights set on making the U.S.
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BUSINESS
September 12, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before Southern California's aerospace industry began going through convulsions in the late 1980s, Norman Schaffer sensed that the good times weren't going to last forever. Hired by Lockheed in 1980 as a metalworker, Schaffer realized that if the company's business slowed down, he could be out on the street. Sure enough, Schaffer wound up being laid off by Lockheed in 1992 as the company wound down its operations in Burbank.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
American businesses are spending their profits on machinery to enhance the productivity of existing workers rather than hiring more people, according to two government reports released Thursday. Companies surveyed by the Commerce Department in April and May said they will increase investment spending on new buildings and equipment by 6.4% this year. Such an increase would be the largest since an 11.4% rise in 1989.
WORLD
October 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Marriage in China used to be a matter between a man, a woman -- and the couple's employers. No longer. China on Wednesday eliminated a much-resented requirement that couples obtain their bosses' approval before tying the knot, prompting thousands of people to wed in what, for some, was also a celebration of the retreat of interference in their private lives. Couples lined up as early as 5 a.m. outside marriage registration offices.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Thomas found a job at Oracle Systems Corp. in San Francisco after logging on to the Internet on his laptop from his parents' home 3,000 miles away in New Jersey. Unlike many his age, Thomas, 25, wasn't interested in the Internet or electronic mail until he realized they could broaden his job search. A Stanford graduate with a degree in psychology, Thomas used career resources on the Internet to transform himself from a freelance writer into a legal assistant in Oracle's software division.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
For the most chances to get a job, consider working in Los Angeles. But if you want to earn a high wage, try New York City. A new U.S. Census Bureau report being released today shows that populous Los Angeles County leads the nation with the largest number of businesses while Manhattan tops the chart with the highest average salary. The bureau's 2003 County Business Patterns report analyzes business establishments in more than 1,000 industries on the national, state and local levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | LEE CONDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For most of his 20 years in business here, Fred Moseni has relied on teenage workers to fill shifts at his family restaurant, the Pizza Cookery on Ventura Boulevard. But now, just one of his 25 employees is a teenage part timer. "They used to walk in here looking for a job," Moseni said. "They don't walk in anymore."
BUSINESS
March 4, 2004 | From Reuters
The vast U.S. service sector grew robustly in February, but the expansion slowed from the previous month's record and job creation remained sluggish, an industry survey showed Wednesday. The Institute for Supply Management's nonmanufacturing index fell to 60.8 in February from 65.7 in January, below Wall Street estimates of a dip to 63. A number above 50 indicates growth.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
California employers added a net 18,500 jobs in March, the state reported Friday, a solid gain that analysts said was further evidence of the state economy's resilience in the face of a housing slump. It was the 10th month in the last 11 that California added jobs, according to the state Employment Development Department. The biggest gains came in the robust leisure and hospitality industry.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MARTHA GROVES
Career consultant Rudy Dew once received a resume from a job-hunting executive making more than $100,000 a year. It was 17 pages long. In the opinion of Dew, a vice president in the Los Angeles office of Hay Career Consultants, and other job experts, that's about 16 pages too many. All right, if someone's a real hotshot, he or she might get away with a two-page resume, but no more. Here are other resume tips gathered from Dew; Robert O. Snelling Sr., president of Snelling Inc.
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