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SPORTS
July 26, 1997
As former board members of Encino Baseball Incorporated, as well as members of the Encino Little League and Pony Baseball programs, we are appalled by the recent actions of Encino Little League against Woodland Hills. Our sons played on numerous Encino all-star teams. Throughout the years we were involved in the youth baseball programs at the Encino complex, there were many instances of residency violations that were overlooked when friends wanted to play baseball with friends. This practice, we suspect, is very common in all Little League programs that exist all across America.
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SPORTS
August 2, 1997
Leslie and Gary Persell's attack on Encino Little League and its all-star manager, Rob Glushon, reflects nothing more than a personal vendetta. The Persells left the Encino Baseball program years ago. Their accusation that our all-star manager spearheaded the investigation leading to the disqualification of the two Woodland Hills players is untrue. The information and documentation provided to Little League officials in Williamsport were given to numerous coaches and officials from our league.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997
It is with sadness and dismay that we read about the controversy surrounding the Woodland Hills [and] Encino Little League teams ("Disqualifications Disrupt Little Leaguers," July 19). Having dedicated many years to the Little League program in the past, bringing in "ringers" is nothing new. It probably has been done since the inception of Little League and will continue to be done until adults can act like adults, instead of acting like children. Except for the egos of some of the parents and coaches, no one benefited from this mess--probably not even the lawyers who did all of the work, since their kids were probably playing on the teams anyway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1997
It is with sadness and dismay that we read about the controversy surrounding the Woodland Hills [and] Encino Little League teams ("Disqualifications Disrupt Little Leaguers," July 19). Having dedicated many years to the Little League program in the past, bringing in "ringers" is nothing new. It probably has been done since the inception of Little League and will continue to be done until adults can act like adults, instead of acting like children. Except for the egos of some of the parents and coaches, no one benefited from this mess--probably not even the lawyers who did all of the work, since their kids were probably playing on the teams anyway.
SPORTS
August 2, 1997
Leslie and Gary Persell's attack on Encino Little League and its all-star manager, Rob Glushon, reflects nothing more than a personal vendetta. The Persells left the Encino Baseball program years ago. Their accusation that our all-star manager spearheaded the investigation leading to the disqualification of the two Woodland Hills players is untrue. The information and documentation provided to Little League officials in Williamsport were given to numerous coaches and officials from our league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Melissa Manchester will sing the National Anthem, and Lt. Gov. Gray Davis will throw out the first ball to Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. Today must be opening day in the majors. Yes and no. It is opening day, but the field of dreams is the Encino Little League, where the only person to call a strike is the umpire, and the only number that means anything is the final score. "It's a timeless tradition," said Rob Glushon, league president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1995 | ISAAC GUZMAN
In celebration of their league's 40th season, Encino Little Leaguers were treated to an opening-day entertainment lineup worthy of the majors. Before the first pitch at the Encino Little League field Saturday, Melissa Manchester and a chorus of budding Babe Ruths sang the national anthem. Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky tossed out the first ball, and television personalities Steve Allen and Phil Hartman were on hand to toast--and roast--the league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a place that craves a sense of normalcy, Los Angeles is it. After earthquakes, fires, floods, riots, high unemployment and reports of approaching killer bees, how better to celebrate order and renewal than with the spring ritual of youth baseball? As if to proclaim that life goes on, Mayor Richard Riordan on Saturday morning joined hundreds of parents and children for opening day ceremonies of the Encino Little League.
SPORTS
May 25, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Why don't sharks eat Hollywood agents? Professional courtesy. That's an old joke in Hollywood, where agents are perceived as only slightly more sensitive and moral than producers. Fortunately, not every agent fits the profile. There is one out there who actually gives agents a good name. Meet Jack Gilardi, probably the only agent in history who is high enough on the evolutionary ladder to have a Little League field named after him. "He's not your average Hollywood agent," says O. J. Simpson, who has been represented by Gilardi for some 17 years on nothing but a handshake.
SPORTS
July 26, 1997
As former board members of Encino Baseball Incorporated, as well as members of the Encino Little League and Pony Baseball programs, we are appalled by the recent actions of Encino Little League against Woodland Hills. Our sons played on numerous Encino all-star teams. Throughout the years we were involved in the youth baseball programs at the Encino complex, there were many instances of residency violations that were overlooked when friends wanted to play baseball with friends. This practice, we suspect, is very common in all Little League programs that exist all across America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1995 | ISAAC GUZMAN
In celebration of their league's 40th season, Encino Little Leaguers were treated to an opening-day entertainment lineup worthy of the majors. Before the first pitch at the Encino Little League field Saturday, Melissa Manchester and a chorus of budding Babe Ruths sang the national anthem. Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky tossed out the first ball, and television personalities Steve Allen and Phil Hartman were on hand to toast--and roast--the league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Melissa Manchester will sing the National Anthem, and Lt. Gov. Gray Davis will throw out the first ball to Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. Today must be opening day in the majors. Yes and no. It is opening day, but the field of dreams is the Encino Little League, where the only person to call a strike is the umpire, and the only number that means anything is the final score. "It's a timeless tradition," said Rob Glushon, league president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a place that craves a sense of normalcy, Los Angeles is it. After earthquakes, fires, floods, riots, high unemployment and reports of approaching killer bees, how better to celebrate order and renewal than with the spring ritual of youth baseball? As if to proclaim that life goes on, Mayor Richard Riordan on Saturday morning joined hundreds of parents and children for opening day ceremonies of the Encino Little League.
SPORTS
May 25, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Why don't sharks eat Hollywood agents? Professional courtesy. That's an old joke in Hollywood, where agents are perceived as only slightly more sensitive and moral than producers. Fortunately, not every agent fits the profile. There is one out there who actually gives agents a good name. Meet Jack Gilardi, probably the only agent in history who is high enough on the evolutionary ladder to have a Little League field named after him. "He's not your average Hollywood agent," says O. J. Simpson, who has been represented by Gilardi for some 17 years on nothing but a handshake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | CAROL WATSON
Encino sports groups are kicking off a campaign this month to raise $50,000 for repairs needed at a complex of five baseball fields on Hayvenhurst Avenue south of the Ventura Freeway. Aging fences and irrigation pipes must be replaced, the concession stand must be repaired to meet health codes and damage done to dugouts by vandals must be fixed, said Marilyn Miller, president of Encino Baseball Inc., the nonprofit organization that maintains the fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little League baseball officials on Sunday rejected an attempt by a Woodland Hills team to reverse a decision that sidelined two key players from championship play in a dispute over where they live, authorities said. League authorities said they have received no documentation that would cause them to change their decision. On Friday, the two 12-year-old players were declared ineligible after Encino team officials charged that neither player lives in Woodland Hills league boundaries.
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