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Encino Reservoir

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials said Friday they are seeking approval to take the 3-billion-gallon Encino Reservoir largely out of service rather than invest in expensive upgrades to meet tightened state and federal drinking water standards. The open reservoir, an amoeba-shaped lake nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, has helped quench the thirst of hillside residents for more than 80 years. But it is prone to contamination from animal waste, algae and runoff draining from nearby hillsides.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A Los Angeles Fire Department captain was injured in a fall Wednesday evening as about 100 firefighters battled a huge blaze raging at a home in Encino, according to preliminary information from an agency spokesman. The captain was transported to a hospital, LAFD spokesman Erik Scott told The Times.  A second captain and another firefighter were also injured and taken to hospitals. All three received injuries that were not life-threatening, the LAFD said. Flames tore through the roof of the three-story home and thick clouds of smoke billowed into the sky as firefighters battled the blaze, according to television news footage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Scapa will be ringing in 2003 on a bittersweet note. He's resigned to the fact that the new year will be a noisy one on his Encino street, but he's not looking forward to it. His home borders the Encino Reservoir, where construction of a 30,000-square-foot filtration plant has already begun. The plant is a crucial part of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's effort to comply with stricter regulations for open-air reservoirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Scapa will be ringing in 2003 on a bittersweet note. He's resigned to the fact that the new year will be a noisy one on his Encino street, but he's not looking forward to it. His home borders the Encino Reservoir, where construction of a 30,000-square-foot filtration plant has already begun. The plant is a crucial part of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's effort to comply with stricter regulations for open-air reservoirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Los Angeles water and power officials have released a series of "milestones" intended to set the pace for development of a $150-million water filtration plant for Encino Reservoir. Under a pact signed last week with the state Department of Health Services, the reservoir is one of four in which drinking water must be purified because it is exposed to the elements and poses risks of waterborne diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Officials from the city Department of Water and Power will field questions tonight about a controversial proposal to build a five-acre water filtration plant on or near the Encino Reservoir. Questions about the safety of chemicals that would be used in the plant's operation and regarding any impact a plant might have on wildlife are among those expected to be addressed at the 7:30 p.m. meeting of the Encino Reservoir Coalition at the Encino Community Center at 4935 Balboa Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI and DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neighbors of Encino Reservoir have formed a coalition with a twofold purpose: to block the construction of a proposed $60-million water tank and filtration plant in their backyard or at least to mitigate the effects of having thousands of truckloads of cement traverse their secluded hillside retreat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997
Neighbors of the Encino Reservoir have formed a coalition to block a proposed $60-million water tank and filtration plant in their backyard or at least mitigate the effects of having thousands of truckloads of concrete traverse their secluded hillside. By 2003 the city Department of Water and Power is mandated by federal and state regulations to build a water tank and a filtration plant next to the reservoir that sits atop this quiet neighborhood of winding, tree-lined streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A Los Angeles Fire Department captain was injured in a fall Wednesday evening as about 100 firefighters battled a huge blaze raging at a home in Encino, according to preliminary information from an agency spokesman. The captain was transported to a hospital, LAFD spokesman Erik Scott told The Times.  A second captain and another firefighter were also injured and taken to hospitals. All three received injuries that were not life-threatening, the LAFD said. Flames tore through the roof of the three-story home and thick clouds of smoke billowed into the sky as firefighters battled the blaze, according to television news footage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is considering building filtration plants at four open reservoirs in the Santa Monica Mountains to meet newly imposed state water-quality standards. The plan, which would cost $400 million, would involve the Encino Reservoir, the Lower Stone Canyon Reservoir north of Bel-Air and the Upper and Lower Hollywood reservoirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials said Friday they are seeking approval to take the 3-billion-gallon Encino Reservoir largely out of service rather than invest in expensive upgrades to meet tightened state and federal drinking water standards. The open reservoir, an amoeba-shaped lake nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains, has helped quench the thirst of hillside residents for more than 80 years. But it is prone to contamination from animal waste, algae and runoff draining from nearby hillsides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
To save as much as $100 million, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power officials have announced a proposal to take the Encino and Lower Stone Canyon reservoirs out of daily service. Since the water would be used only in emergencies or during droughts, the decision would allow the DWP to build smaller filtration systems at each reservoir, officials said. "It's a marvelous result after all this hard work," Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Feuer said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI and DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neighbors of Encino Reservoir have formed a coalition with a twofold purpose: to block the construction of a proposed $60-million water tank and filtration plant in their backyard or at least to mitigate the effects of having thousands of truckloads of cement traverse their secluded hillside retreat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997
Neighbors of the Encino Reservoir have formed a coalition to block a proposed $60-million water tank and filtration plant in their backyard or at least mitigate the effects of having thousands of truckloads of concrete traverse their secluded hillside. By 2003 the city Department of Water and Power is mandated by federal and state regulations to build a water tank and a filtration plant next to the reservoir that sits atop this quiet neighborhood of winding, tree-lined streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1993
The article on Canada geese in the Valley (Nov. 10) was terrific. There are few spectacles more exciting than 100 geese flying across the sky in a long strung-out line, circling and coming in for a landing. Their loud call is the very essence of wildness. The five areas you highlighted are indeed the only remaining open spaces for the geese in the entire city. These areas must be protected from intrusion or development or the time may come when the geese will give up on the San Fernando Valley and we will have lost a gift of great value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Los Angeles water and power officials have released a series of "milestones" intended to set the pace for development of a $150-million water filtration plant for Encino Reservoir. Under a pact signed last week with the state Department of Health Services, the reservoir is one of four in which drinking water must be purified because it is exposed to the elements and poses risks of waterborne diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1993
The article on Canada geese in the Valley (Nov. 10) was terrific. There are few spectacles more exciting than 100 geese flying across the sky in a long strung-out line, circling and coming in for a landing. Their loud call is the very essence of wildness. The five areas you highlighted are indeed the only remaining open spaces for the geese in the entire city. These areas must be protected from intrusion or development or the time may come when the geese will give up on the San Fernando Valley and we will have lost a gift of great value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Encino homeowner leaders who had expressed concerns about plans to build a filtration plant for the Encino Reservoir said Saturday that perhaps the plant could be built without marring the peaceful atmosphere of the surrounding, tony community. Some concerns remain, they said after completing a tour of the reservoir. But the homeowners said they were encouraged by finding some potential sites for the facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Officials from the city Department of Water and Power will field questions tonight about a controversial proposal to build a five-acre water filtration plant on or near the Encino Reservoir. Questions about the safety of chemicals that would be used in the plant's operation and regarding any impact a plant might have on wildlife are among those expected to be addressed at the 7:30 p.m. meeting of the Encino Reservoir Coalition at the Encino Community Center at 4935 Balboa Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1993 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a continuing campaign to stop construction of water filtration plants near Encino Reservoir and two other water supply lakes, homeowner activists from affluent neighborhoods are reaching out to lawmakers to try to roll back health regulations that require the plants be built. The homeowners fear that the plants--each about five acres--would lower property values, spoil lake views and pose a health hazard because of storage and use of chemical disinfectants.
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