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WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - - Pope Benedict XVI called on Christians and Muslims on Saturday to forge a common front against warfare, even as battles raged in neighboring Syria and the new U.N. peace envoy to that country conceded that the situation there was deteriorating. “It is time for Muslims and Christians to come together so as to put an end to violence and war,” Benedict, 85, told an enthusiastic youth gathering on the second day of his three-day visit to Lebanon. The pontiff spoke directly to young Syrians who were in attendance, singling them out for praise.
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WORLD
March 7, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Amid a surge of Islamic militancy in North Africa, a team of fewer than 50 U.S. special operations troops with a single helicopter arrived at a remote base in western Tunisia last month. Their mission: train Tunisian troops in counter-terrorism tactics. The operation was one of dozens of U.S. military deployments in Africa over the last year, often to tiny and temporary outposts. The goal is to leverage American military expertise against an arc of growing instability in North Africa and many sub-Saharan countries, from Mali in the west to Somalia in the east.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2000
Re "Is Our Drug Policy Failing? Don't Ask," March 29 op-ed by Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray: I sure wish The Times would get on Judge Gray's bandwagon. You have the power to help government understand the truth about its "war on drugs." I've watched it fail since the '60s, and now it's expanding, with continued failure as the only result. It just seems obvious that the illicit profits sustain the worldwide use and distribution of these killer drugs. Make them legal and controlled, and tax their sales.
WORLD
September 15, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - Defending his handling of the biggest international crisis of his second term, President Obama said a deal to seize Syria's chemical arsenal could be the foundation for a political settlement to resolve that country's civil war without U.S. military intervention. In an interview taped Friday , the day before the United States and Russia reached a deal that would impound or destroy Syrian President Bashar Assad's chemical stockpile by mid-2014, Obama said his decision to seek a diplomatic resolution, which critics have sharply derided, would stop Assad's use of his most indiscriminate weapons.
WORLD
August 20, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The French and Italians have sent their aircraft carriers home. The British have withdrawn their spy plane. Canada is pulling out air crews. The Danes are running out of bombs. And the Norwegians have dropped out entirely. As their Libyan rebel allies finally are showing progress on the battlefield, members of the NATO alliance are scraping and scrounging these days to keep the five-month air campaign against Moammar Kadafi's government aloft long enough to make it to the finish line.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2008
Bush's war in Iraq will eventually cost $3 trillion. That works out to about $15,000 a person, and that's how much money I could be getting as a gift from the Internal Revenue Service, instead of $600, if we pulled the plug on the war. ("Retailers hope for share of rebates," April 14.) Matthew Okada Pasadena
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Serbian occupiers vowing to foil U.N. plans to end the war in what used to be Yugoslavia, Croats contend that the only way to secure their territory is by combatting force with force. Croatian officials, fighters and civilians believe that diplomatic recognition of their nation implies a right to deter an aggression that has already put one-third of their country under Serbian control.
OPINION
June 28, 2011 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
At periodic intervals, the American body politic has shown a marked susceptibility to messianic fevers. Whenever an especially acute attack occurs, a sort of delirium ensues, manifesting itself in delusions of grandeur and demented behavior. By the time the condition passes and a semblance of health is restored, recollection of what occurred during the interval of illness tends to be hazy. What happened? How'd we get here? Most Americans prefer not to dwell on the questions. Feeling much better now!
BUSINESS
April 27, 2008
In a letter ("End war in Iraq, for rebate's sake," April 20), a reader calculated the income tax rebate to each American if an estimated $3-trillion debt for the current war had not been generated. Perhaps as enlightening is that such a sum is equivalent to $60,000 per person in Iraq and Afghanistan. An Iraqi family of five with $300,000, for example, would be rich almost anywhere in the world. Drop money, not bombs? Lewis Cohen Riverside
NEWS
December 2, 1990
The 1990 recipients of the annual Beyond War Award will be honored Saturday at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles. The program begins at 9:45 a.m. with a reception, followed by entertainment and presentation ceremonies broadcast via satellite from Oslo, Prague and San Francisco. Receiving the award are Gro Harlem Brundtland, prime minister of Norway; President Vaclav Havel and the people of Czechoslovakia, and Earth Day International 1990.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe and his rival, Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, on Thursady appeared headed for a replay of the 2008 disputed election result.  As a senior member of Mugabe's ZANU-PF party anonymously claimed victory in a telephone interview with Reuters news agency, Tsvangirai called a press conference in Harare declaring Wednesday's election "null and void" and "a huge farce. " Tsvangirai's main task now is to convince African Union and southern African election observers that the poll was fraudulent on the basis of a problematic voter roll that included many dead people and duplicate names.
WORLD
February 22, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - John Kerry opened his diplomatic mission to Syria in 2009 with a decidedly undiplomatic question for President Bashar Assad: Why did so few Arab leaders trust Assad? One month into President Obama's first term, the then-chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee was in Damascus to explore the possibility of Syrian-Israeli peace talks. But minutes into their meeting, Kerry pressed the Syrian autocrat to explain why other Middle Eastern rulers said Assad always "says one thing and does another ... or he says he will do something then doesn't do it. " Assad, clearly startled by the question, demanded examples.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Just when they expected a flood of heavy weapons to help them make a major push against the forces of President Bashar Assad, rebel commanders in Syria say, arms shipments from outside the country have instead slowed, prolonging a conflict now nearing the end of its second year. Though rebels have made gains in the north and east, seizing military bases and checkpoints, opposition figures who had made predictions of quick victory now say their arsenal is at a level that can support only a war of attrition.
WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - - Pope Benedict XVI called on Christians and Muslims on Saturday to forge a common front against warfare, even as battles raged in neighboring Syria and the new U.N. peace envoy to that country conceded that the situation there was deteriorating. “It is time for Muslims and Christians to come together so as to put an end to violence and war,” Benedict, 85, told an enthusiastic youth gathering on the second day of his three-day visit to Lebanon. The pontiff spoke directly to young Syrians who were in attendance, singling them out for praise.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
FT. BLISS, Texas - Two years ago, as he declared the end to a long and divisive war, President Obama promised troops he would not be taking a “victory lap.” On Friday, the president allowed himself something of a brief victory dance. Obama visited with troops and military families at Ft. Bliss on Friday, marking the two-year anniversary of the end of U.S. combat operations in Iraq. The president's trip was a replay of a similar trip two years ago, when he visited the base just hours before a televised address declaring the end of the war. “That night I told the American people that all our troops would be out of Iraq by the end of the following year,” Obama said.
WORLD
August 20, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The French and Italians have sent their aircraft carriers home. The British have withdrawn their spy plane. Canada is pulling out air crews. The Danes are running out of bombs. And the Norwegians have dropped out entirely. As their Libyan rebel allies finally are showing progress on the battlefield, members of the NATO alliance are scraping and scrounging these days to keep the five-month air campaign against Moammar Kadafi's government aloft long enough to make it to the finish line.
OPINION
June 4, 2006
Mercenaries may be an answer in Darfur, as suggested by Max Boot (Opinion, May 31). But the real problems with U.N. efforts to stem violence in the world is the United States' stubborn refusal to consider the United Nations as anything other than a corrupt bureaucracy that caters to liberal causes and is ineffective in everything. The U.N. has not traditionally had the money, expertise or military wherewithal to effectively deal with the world's problems as it should. But the U.S. does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1986
What qualifies Elie Wiesel to be this year's recipient of the Nobel Prize for Peace? He has not led any mass movements on behalf of civil rights. He has not negotiated any treaty to end war or prevent conflict. He has not gone into the slums to comfort the sick or feed the hungry. Why, then, has this Romanian-born, naturalized American citizen, a survivor of Nazi extermination camps and the author of 25 books, been so singularly honored?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2011 | By Marla Stone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
To End All Wars A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 Adam Hochschild Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 450 pp., $28 We think of Europe in 1914 as a continent all too eager for war — volunteers jamming recruiting offices, festooned soldiers joyfully marching to battle and delirious crowds waving them off. To a significant extent, that vision is true, and for a time the Great War brought domestic unity and shared purpose to...
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