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OPINION
March 31, 2002
Re "Shooting Fish in a Barrel," editorial, March 26: Endangered species studies must consider local economic interest. We cannot destroy our society just to save everything that wiggles. Denying the economic impact is like taking the medicine that will cure the disease but kills the patient. Allen C. Hagelberg Upland
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal wildlife officials on Friday said Devil's Hole pupfish have laid eggs in captivity for the first time, a biological breakthrough that could save the nearly extinct species. "We're thrilled - we've passed a major milestone," said Olin Feuerbacher, an aquaculturist at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility in Amargosa Valley, Nev., which is home to all 29 of the federally endangered Devil's Hole pupfish now in captivity. "We now have a good chance of establishing a captive lifeboat population.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001
Re "Once Vibrant Beach Colony a Ghost Town," Aug. 30: The LAX/El Segundo sand dunes are not just a "butterfly preserve"; there are 11 endangered species there. (Only one needed to be declared--the El Segundo blue butterfly, since the land was thereby saved.) All told, scientists have documented more than 1,000 species of plants and animals on the site, many of them fascinating and unusual. It will take years for the restoration effort to remove the European weed-grasses that make the dunes appear brown in the summer, but once it's done, the El Segundo sand dunes will be known as they once were--the most beautiful flowering area in all of Los Angeles.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It was well known for many years that Japan's "scientific whaling" program was a sham, designed to get around the international moratorium on hunting whales. Almost no research on the animals came from Japanese scientists; instead, whale meat kept showing up in restaurants and school lunches. Finally, Australia, a whaling country until 1978 and now an avid opponent, called Japan's bluff over the hundreds of whales it killed each year in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary surrounding Antarctica.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
Sen. Blanche Lincoln is one of the most endangered Democrats on the political landscape this year. The two-term Arkansas moderate is getting only 38% or 39% against any of her little-known Republican opponents, according to a recent Rasmussen poll. Politico is putting her "at the top of the list of vulnerable Democrats." And providing President Obama with his 60th vote for healthcare reform in the Senate isn't helping in a state where public opinion is running strongly against it. To stretch a metaphor, she's more endangered than that infamous snail darter that delayed Tennessee's Tellico Dam. Now, the League of Conservation Voters is going after Lincoln for her opposition to a climate change bill.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
Federal officials announced today that they are removing the brown pelican from the endangered species list, capping a century-long recovery that started under President Theodore Roosevelt. The brown pelican is an avian fixture in Southern California and along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Florida, where Roosevelt established the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island to protect the bird from human slaughter. It is an icon in Louisiana, where it is the state bird and where Interior Department officials assembled today at the Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge near New Orleans to proclaim the brown pelican "fully recovered" and no longer in need of federal protection.
OPINION
April 29, 2002
I was glad to see that Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez) helped to introduce the bipartisan Endangered Species Recovery Act on April 24. This legislation would help return a species to its natural population and habitat, not just keep it on the endangered species list in perpetuity. The bill would provide for good scientific analysis and creation of recovery plans for species so that their populations would start to grow. The bill would also benefit landowners who commit to conservation by providing them with incentives.
MAGAZINE
April 2, 2000
How nice that the Hederers were able to "warm up" their Brentwood home ("From Bauhaus to Wow Haus," by Barbara Thornburg, SoCal Style, March 12). Unfortunately, their use of redwood and mahogany to achieve that effect was environmentally irresponsible. It is time for clients, decorators and architects to stop using endangered wood products, which may indeed warm up homes but also contribute to warming the planet. Dr. Harry Drasin Pacific Palisades
NEWS
June 9, 1989
A rare peregrine falcon was shot to death in Sebastopol by a racing pigeon fancier who thought the powerful bird killed one of his collection, officials said. "I think he felt real bad," Capt. Mike Wade of the state Fish and Game Department said of Martin MacDonell, 32. Wade said he will ask the district attorney to charge MacDonell with killing a bird belonging to an endangered species. The peregrine falcon nearly became extinct in the United States in the 1960s and '70s when ingested residue of the now-banned insecticide DDT caused the bird to lay eggs with shells so thin that few produced chicks.
MAGAZINE
March 9, 2003
You have chosen to characterize the Delhi sand dunes in Colton and Rialto as interesting only to a few nerdy entomologists ("A Simple Case of Insecticide," by Matthew Heller, Feb. 16). From 1995 to 2000, our organization involved more than 100 volunteers--students, businesspeople, aerospace workers, housewives and local residents--to restore these wonderful dunes. It's only recently that the land was trashed and subjected to industrial sprawl and overdevelopment. The endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly, which is helping save a little bit of this land, is much more reminiscent of a hummingbird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Laura J. Nelson
A plan for increasing the sales tax to fix Los Angeles' broken streets is on a collision course with a similar levy being pushed for regional transit projects. Two weeks ago, the top budget advisor to the Los Angeles City Council said a tax increase is the only way thousands of miles of severely damaged roads and sidewalks will get repaired. A half-cent increase in the sales tax, which would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years, should appear on the November ballot, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
TECOPA, Calif. - Under a canopy of gleaming stars, Janet Foley made her way across a dab of marshlands surrounded by harsh Mojave Desert terrain, her headlamp fixed on a live trap the size of a loaf of bread. She peered inside, smiled and said, "Hi there, cutie. " The creature staring back at her was a federally endangered Amargosa vole, one of the rarest mammals in North America. Foley recorded its vital statistics, attached an identification tag to its right ear and released it back into the wild.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By Andrew Harmon
Over the last several months, a young brown pelican's obsessive preening regimen has dominated the view from my office window at the Northern California wildlife hospital where I work. We don't name the patients we care for - if animals could talk, I imagine the first thing they'd express is their dislike of anthropomorphism. But I can't stop thinking of him as Red, because of the colored temporary band on his right leg. Red's the closest thing I've had to a cubicle mate. He came to us in September with a severe injury to his left patagium (a fold of skin on the leading edge of the wing)
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Eureka Dunes, a towering expanse of shifting slopes wedged between weathered mountains in the Mojave Desert, had a reputation as a campground, an off-road vehicle course and a home to a few plant species found no place else on Earth. In the late 1970s, the dunes earned a reputation as an area where the Eureka Valley evening primrose and Eureka dune grass were listed as federally endangered species to protect them from being driven to extinction by off-road vehicle recreation. On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that the plants be removed from the list because their populations have stabilized in a region that became part of Death Valley National Park in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Don't blame the little fish. And don't call it the Central Valley. Both comments, repeated incessantly, were irritants during President Obama's visit to parched California farm country last week. The president was there - in the San Joaquin Valley - to cuddle with water hogs. The hogs are large growers who use lots of water, have just about run out and are angry because they're being denied other people's. And they keep complaining that the government is favoring a little "bait fish" over farmers.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
North America's tallest bird, with a population of about 600, has lost three adults to gunfire in recent months, which "senselessly" undercuts plans to breed a thriving population of the radiant white whooping crane, wildlife authorities say. Decades of research and millions of dollars have been spent by government and private organizations to revive the species, whose population shrank to 23 in 1954, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service....
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Julie Cart
Twenty years of federal and local efforts to save the Oregon chub, a tiny minnow found only in the Willamette River Basin floodplain, have brought the fish to the verge of being taken off the endangered species list. If the effort is successful, the chub will be the first fish de-listed because its species is considered recovered. Chub thrive in habitats with little water flow and were imperiled by habitat loss and threats from nonnative fish. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and private landowners collaborated to restore habitat and natural water flows.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Migrating birds probably did it. That's what UC Davis epidemiology professor Janet Foley says after DNA detective work confirmed that a disease-carrying tick only found in the southeastern United States has colonized a federally endangered  rodent population in an extremely isolated patch of Mojave Desert wetlands. DNA sequencing also shows that the relic population of Amargosa voles near Tecopa, Calif., just east of Death Valley National Park, and the tick that scientists know as Ixodes minor also share Borrelia burgdorferi ,  the tick-borne bacterium responsible for Lyme disease.
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