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Endangered Animals

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NEWS
December 11, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This holiday season may give new meaning to the term "recycled gifts." Take a stroll through the stores and you're likely to find, amid the usual toasters and slippers and television sets, a surprising array of ecology- minded products. 'Tis the season, it seems, to save the planet. Christmas cards and gift-wrapping paper made from recycled paper were the forerunners of this movement. Now you'll find chocolates shaped like endangered animals.
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OPINION
December 15, 2013
Re "Looting on a grand scale," Dec. 12 I find it strange and troubling that no one involved in the case of a La Habra Heights mansion that was looted by teenagers after a party seems concerned with the fact that the wealthy owners of the mansion had a stuffed snow leopard in their house. Snow leopards are one of the most endangered animals on this planet. It is truly despicable that these people would use this beautiful creature as a stuffed decoration or conversation piece. The article states that the mounted snow leopard is worth $250,000.
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NEWS
August 1, 1993 | SONJA BARISIC, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Betsy Dresser and her colleagues at the Cincinnati Zoo are using DNA to keep endangered animals from going the way of the dinosaur. They freeze embryos, sperm and eggs from endangered animals as a safety net against extinction. "If scientists had been around with this technology when the dinosaurs were here, we could indeed bring them back," said Dresser, director of research at the zoo's Center for Reproduction of Endangered Wildlife. About 90% of every cell is made of water.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Two men have been arrested in Thailand after singer Rihanna posted a picture with an endangered animal they were allegedly using to sell photo ops on the island of Phuket. The "Stay" songstress, who is no stranger to racy selfies, posted one particularly scandalous photo on Instagram over the weekend that had nothing to do with exposing her body. While taking a break from her Diamonds World Tour before a concert in Singapore on Sunday, the singer took in the Thai nightlife and cuddled with a slow loris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The newly formed group of Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep barreled up rugged Olancha Peak last month, the 10 females and four males becoming the first new herd of the endangered animals reintroduced in California in 25 years. Once abundant throughout the region's alpine areas, the state's population of Sierra Nevada bighorn had dwindled to two herds by the 1970s. Their numbers have been devastated by disease spread by contact with domestic sheep and goats and unregulated commercial hunting.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | MARK JORDAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bears that used to roam the forests of Thailand, Burma and Cambodia are now caged for their own protection. Life is bleak inside the steel bars, but the alternative is to be tortured and eaten. Their enemy is not another wild animal, but man. In many Asian countries, bear meat is prized as an elixir for good health and virility.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1997
Photographers Susan Middleton and David Liittschwager will discuss their work in "Witness: Endangered Species of North America" on May 17 at 8 p.m. at UC Santa Barbara's Campbell Hall. Tickets are $5 and $7 for the discussion on the plight of endangered animals, fish and plants. Information: (805) 893-2080.
NEWS
March 1, 1997
Peter Stewart, 41, a muralist who highlighted Southern California communities with his bold images of endangered animals, rain forests and Vietnam veterans. A veteran, Stewart in 1995 directed a dozen homeless veterans in painting a 26,000-square-foot mural on an underpass for the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last month, Colombian wildlife officials raided a marketplace in Girardot, three hours to the south of the capital, arriving in a motorcade, sealing off the area and swooping up the captives: monkeys, songbirds and raptors, dozens of endangered animals. "It was a perfect operation," said one official, exulting in having prevented the sale and possible slaughter of the protected species.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | JOHN SEEWER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four African gazelles, free to run on the nation's largest endangered wildlife preserve, clustered near a fence. For these endangered animals born in zoos, it was only natural. "They're used to being in captivity. They stay near the fence because that's where they're comfortable," said Mark Artzner, director of development of the Wilds, a 24-square-mile reclaimed strip mine in eastern Ohio. "But gradually you'll see them getting more adventurous."
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The public has voted, and the sad-faced blobfish has been declared the ugliest endangered animal on the planet.  Some have said the gelatinous deep-sea dweller that can grow up to 12 inches long resembles a mini- Jabba the Hutt . We think it also looks like a gloppy version of the comic strip character Ziggy. British comedian Paul Foot, who campaigned for the blobfish in a video posted to YouTube , said he saw a sadness and wisdom in the blobfish's face. "The eyes are kind, and very wise," he says in the video.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The newly formed group of Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep barreled up rugged Olancha Peak last month, the 10 females and four males becoming the first new herd of the endangered animals reintroduced in California in 25 years. Once abundant throughout the region's alpine areas, the state's population of Sierra Nevada bighorn had dwindled to two herds by the 1970s. Their numbers have been devastated by disease spread by contact with domestic sheep and goats and unregulated commercial hunting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The California Coastal Commission, concerned about harm to fish and marine mammals, on Wednesday scuttled Pacific Gas & Electric Co.'s plan to conduct seismic surveys with underwater air cannons offshore of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. The commission's 10-0 vote followed a marathon hearing in the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. Commission staff and environmentalists debated utility officials throughout the day over the potential damage the sonic blasts would cause near scenic Morro Bay on the Cental California coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
People who love the Los Angeles Zoo get excited about any new animal — be it tiger cub, former circus elephant or Komodo dragon hatchling. So imagine the thrill of 66 new arrivals at one time, among them a Channel Island fox, a baby rhinoceros, a lioness, three racehorses and … a unicorn. All the animals, including the mythical one, have found a home in the zoo's newest habitat — the Tom Mankiewicz Conservation Carousel, which will open to the public Oct. 27. PHOTOS: Colorful carousel The hope is that the colorful new attraction will be a big draw and — at $3 for a three-minute ride — generate cash for the zoo for years to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The captivating documentary "Born to Be Wild 3D" spotlights the amazing efforts of two unique women — elephant authority Daphne M. Sheldrick and famed primatologist Biruté Mary Galdikas — who have dedicated their lives to the rescue and rehabilitation of orphaned, endangered animals. Although it runs just a fleet 40 minutes, the film proves a rich and memorable journey. Warmly directed by David Lickley and presented in arresting IMAX 3-D, the movie shuttles between Kenya-based Sheldrick's work raising baby elephants and Galdikas' labors on behalf of orangutans in the Borneo rain forest.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
As the world heats up and polar ice melts, different types of bears, whales and seals could meet and mate ? but these unions may be far from happy, researchers said Wednesday. In fact, interspecies sex brought on by the melting Arctic ice could lead to the extinction of many endangered Arctic animals, the scientists said in an article published in the journal Nature. At least 22 species are at risk of hybridizing in 34 different combinations, according to a team led by Brendan Kelly, an Alaska-based evolutionary biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
OPINION
December 15, 2013
Re "Looting on a grand scale," Dec. 12 I find it strange and troubling that no one involved in the case of a La Habra Heights mansion that was looted by teenagers after a party seems concerned with the fact that the wealthy owners of the mansion had a stuffed snow leopard in their house. Snow leopards are one of the most endangered animals on this planet. It is truly despicable that these people would use this beautiful creature as a stuffed decoration or conversation piece. The article states that the mounted snow leopard is worth $250,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jessica Garcia-Torres is a brave woman--and a good storyteller. This afternoon, parents and children can see this for themselves when she displays a live tarantula to illustrate an African folk tale during story time at the Northridge Branch Library. The folk tale, "Anansi Goes Fishing," involves a battle of wits between a spider and a turtle, and there will be a live amphibian along to help illustrate the story.
WORLD
November 19, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Wildlife groups react with shock to news of the discovery at the Letaba Ranch Game Reserve. South Africa has seen a major increase in rhino killings this year, with poachers armed with AK-47s frequently attacking the endangered animals. South African wildlife officials found the decomposing bodies of 18 rhinos ? all dehorned victims of poaching ? in a remote area of a large private game reserve close to the border of Kruger National Park, authorities said Friday. Wildlife organizations reacted with shock to news of the find at the 100,000-acre Letaba Ranch Game Reserve.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2009 | Julie Cart
Something has gone awry -- some would say everything has -- in the federal government's effort to reestablish the population of Mexican wolves, North America's most endangered mammal. Beginning with an initial release of 11 wolves in 1998, the Mexican wolf population in the Southwest was projected to reach at least 100 by 2006. Three years beyond, the number of wolves in the wild is half that.
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