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Endangered Species Act

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SCIENCE
March 28, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal authorities announced Friday that the geographically isolated Alexander Archipelago wolf of southeast Alaska's Tongass National Forest may need protection under the Endangered Species Act to survive the impact of logging, hunting and trapping in its old-growth habitat. Populations of the rare subspecies of gray wolf are in steep decline in portions of the heavily logged region, where they den in the root systems of western hemlock and Sitka spruce and hunt black-tailed deer, which also rely on the ancient trees to shield them from harsh winters.
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SCIENCE
March 28, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal authorities announced Friday that the geographically isolated Alexander Archipelago wolf of southeast Alaska's Tongass National Forest may need protection under the Endangered Species Act to survive the impact of logging, hunting and trapping in its old-growth habitat. Populations of the rare subspecies of gray wolf are in steep decline in portions of the heavily logged region, where they den in the root systems of western hemlock and Sitka spruce and hunt black-tailed deer, which also rely on the ancient trees to shield them from harsh winters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1992
The high priest of off-roading, U.S. Sen. Steve Symms (R-Idaho) told the Blue Ribbon Coalition of off-roaders, timber and mining interests how to handle endangered species that wander onto private land, "Shoot, shovel and shut up." With that kind of leadership and that kind of audience, it is going to take a strengthened Endangered Species Act and all the rest of us to keep things even. ELDEN HUGHES Sierra Club Whittier
SCIENCE
March 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
A 20-year struggle by conservationists to secure maximum protection for the arroyo toad appears to be far from over, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week announced that the stout-bodied, short-legged amphibian is ready to hop off the endangered species list. The agency proposed downlisting the toad from endangered to threatened after determining that conservation efforts had improved habitat and reduced threats over the last two decades in areas including the Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in San Diego County.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After considering the case for three weeks, the Supreme Court turned down an appeal involving the Delhi Sands flower-loving fly and a broad challenge to the Endangered Species Act. The court's action leaves intact the federal power to regulate the environment for threatened animals and insects, even those that live entirely in a small area of one state.
OPINION
March 15, 2014
Re "Frog eggs head up the hill," March 13 Efforts to reintroduce red-legged frogs to the Santa Monica Mountains are crucial to assuring the future of these California natives once common in the state. The population of red-legged frogs has declined by more than 90%. Since red-legged frogs gained federal Endangered Species Act protection, we've learned much about threats to our struggling amphibian populations, none more prevalent than the 200 million pounds of pesticides applied to California crops annually, some of which drifts into the frogs' mountain habitats.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Eureka Dunes, a towering expanse of shifting slopes wedged between weathered mountains in the Mojave Desert, had a reputation as a campground, an off-road vehicle course and a home to a few plant species found no place else on Earth. In the late 1970s, the dunes earned a reputation as an area where the Eureka Valley evening primrose and Eureka dune grass were listed as federally endangered species to protect them from being driven to extinction by off-road vehicle recreation. On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed that the plants be removed from the list because their populations have stabilized in a region that became part of Death Valley National Park in 1994.
SCIENCE
December 5, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Although they appear to be perfectly capable of taking care of themselves, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering extending Endangered Species Act protection to 11 tarantula species native to India and Sri Lanka. Sometimes known as parachute spiders, the colorful and fierce-looking arachnids are threatened by the international pet trade, where vividly hued spiders can fetch a few hundred dollars apiece. they are imperiled by shrinking habitats and fragmented ranges. Should the tarantulas gain protected status here, U.S. officials could more easily prohibit their importation and sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
In a 2010 episode of his Animal Planet series "Wild Recon," self-proclaimed reptile expert Donald Schultz told viewers that he planned to track down an Iranian desert monitor lizard -- an endangered species he described as the Holy Grail of monitors, offered the same level of protection as pandas. A court document says he was successful -- but not just on the show: The Inglewood-based herpetologist has been charged with illegally selling two of the lizards without a permit, in violation of the federal Endangered Species Act, according to a criminal complaint filed this week in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday that the northeastern Pacific Ocean population of great white sharks is not in danger of extinction and does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. NOAA had been researching the health of the great white population since last year, when the environmental groups Oceana, Shark Stewards and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a petition calling for endangered species...
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Environmentalists won a big victory for marine animals this week, with a court ruling that requires the government to determine whether dispersants used to to break up oil spills are harmful to endangered species before the chemicals are used in federal waters off California. The settlement in District Court in San Francisco requires the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard to analyze the impacts of dispersant products, which are used to diffuse oil spills into small droplets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Environmental groups are taking the Justice Department to court over a policy that prohibits prosecuting individuals who kill endangered wildlife unless it can be proved that they knew they were targeting a protected animal. Critics charge that the 15-year-old McKittrick policy provides a loophole that has prevented criminal prosecution of dozens of individuals who killed grizzly bears, highly endangered California condors and whooping cranes as well as 48 federally protected Mexican wolves.
OPINION
April 30, 2013
Re "Wolves may lose U.S. protections," April 26 I was saddened to read that the Obama administration is apparently giving up on true recovery of gray wolves in the Lower 48 states. As a wildlife biologist and an attorney, I am disappointed by the increasing role that politics have played recently in decisions related to the Endangered Species Act. Just like the delisting two years ago of wolves in the Northern Rockies, this proposed nationwide delisting is driven by politics, not science.
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