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Endangered Species Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted with criticism from some scientists and environmental groups, the Clinton administration is promising to improve the program that tries to strike a compromise between economic growth and the Endangered Species Act. That program to date has produced more than 240 conservation plans nationwide, from Orange County's coastal hills to the Headwaters redwood forests in Northern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted with criticism from some scientists and environmental groups, the Clinton administration is promising to improve the program that tries to strike a compromise between economic growth and the Endangered Species Act. That program to date has produced more than 240 conservation plans nationwide, from Orange County's coastal hills to the Headwaters redwood forests in Northern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001
Re "Inroads Into Open Space," Sept. 2: This excellent editorial very closely reflects my ideas and feelings and those of many of my colleagues who are interested in protecting open space in Orange County. The transportation problem for those living in Riverside County and working in Orange County should not be solved by constructing highways through our mountains but by long-term solutions, such as putting more industry and business in Riverside County, buying out the private owner of the Riverside Freeway toll road, expanding that freeway and adding more buses and trains between the counties.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
In the eight weeks since Bill Thomas signed on as manager of the Circle K market in Laguna Beach, he has worked 12 to 15 hours a day, seven days a week--by himself. While most of the chain's convenience stores need four to six employees to operate 24 hours a day, Thomas makes do with two. An untouched stack of employment applications sits on his checkout counter, but there are more takers for cigarettes and beef jerky than there are Circle K jobs.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL and ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kenneth Dean worked steadily in Orange County for years. But Dean, 50, has been out of a job for two weeks now--victim of a growing economic malaise striking hard at what has been one of the bulwarks of the county's economy--construction. A union plumber, Dean is one of thousands of construction workers who have been thrown out of work this summer because of the housing slowdown in the county.
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