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Endangered Wildlife

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1986 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
When instructor Kathe O'Donnelly brought the rainbow-billed toucan out of its cage, the sixth-graders who were crowded into the library of Vena Avenue School in Pacoima became silent. "Tia is a member of an endangered species," said O'Donnelly, an employee of Wildlife on Wheels, a nonprofit educational corporation that tries to enhance science programs by taking animals into classrooms. "She lives in the rain forests of South America," O'Donnelly continued.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Environmental groups are taking the Justice Department to court over a policy that prohibits prosecuting individuals who kill endangered wildlife unless it can be proved that they knew they were targeting a protected animal. Critics charge that the 15-year-old McKittrick policy provides a loophole that has prevented criminal prosecution of dozens of individuals who killed grizzly bears, highly endangered California condors and whooping cranes as well as 48 federally protected Mexican wolves.
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NEWS
February 23, 1986 | KATHLEEN MACLAY, Associated Press
The sun is setting over Mirounga Bay when a trumpeting from the shore disrupts the serenity of Southeast Farallon Island. Baby elephant seals dodge three bulls whose ferocious love calls signal the start of a bloody battle for sexual dominance of the island. The breeding season has begun. Lehi and Dome, as they were named by biologists, are the first to fight. Dome wins and moves on to tackle another competitor, Tuco, who is also sent packing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A growing population of American bald eagles in Channel Islands National Park might eventually start feasting on rare seabirds and endangered island foxes, researchers reported Monday. The warning was based on an extensive analysis of the shifting diets of the opportunistic foragers from the Pleistocene era, about 20,000 years ago, to the late 1960s, when they were decimated by widespread use of DDT. It was reported in the online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A national penchant for things foreign and exotic, including odd pets, dulls Japan's concern for endangered species. International criticism has forced a gradual halt to imports of some species and animal products banned by international treaties--most recently, two rare types of sea turtles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1988
The Los Angeles city attorney's office filed misdemeanor charges Thursday against the owner of a North Hollywood store accused of dealing in the skins and carcasses of endangered wildlife, including grizzly bears and moose. Charged in an 11-count complaint with violating the California Endangered Species Act were David Stoffers, 46, of North Hollywood, principal owner of Arte De Mexico, 5356 Riverton Ave., and salesman David Seligman, 38, of Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1991 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Military and civilian workers at Point Mugu hunt ducks every fall in the marshy waters of Mugu Lagoon, a prized wetlands that supports endangered wildlife on the naval air station. But some conservationists contend that hunters scare off the rare birds, disturb nesting habits and trample endangered plants. At the request of federal wildlife officials, Navy scientists began a yearlong study last month to find out what effect hunting has on the wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
By day, Ava Park runs a profitable business producing brochures for the corporate jungle of county law firms. By night, she runs a nonprofit group concerned with elephants being slaughtered in Africa for their tusks. Park is founder of Orange County People for Animals, a Costa Mesa-based animal rights group trying to keep ivory on elephants and off of store shelves.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | Reuters
A West German appeared in a Sydney court Friday charged with trying to export 26 protected Australian birds worth $300,000, which were found drugged and taped up in his suitcases. A spokesman for the Customs Service said Hans Norbert Ottersbach, 31, was arrested Monday as he was about to board a flight to Singapore. Officials found 11 Major Mitchell Cockatoos, six Long Billed Corellas, eight Gang Gang Cockatoos and a Yellow Tailed Black Cockatoo in two suitcases.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The monkey, shackled to an iron stake, paced a narrow strip of dirt filled with its own excrement. As people laughed and pointed, the creature bared its teeth and lunged at the end of its line. "He gets angry," said one trader at the teeming animal market here. "Like a little person." Irma Hermawati gets angry too. The 31-year-old Javanese native is an investigator for the nonprofit group ProFauna, which lobbies on behalf of what she believes is Indonesia's most precious resource: its indigenous wildlife.
WORLD
November 2, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The monkey, shackled to an iron stake, paced a narrow strip of dirt filled with its own excrement. As people laughed and pointed, the creature bared its teeth and lunged at the end of its line. "He gets angry," said one trader at the teeming animal market here. "Like a little person." Irma Hermawati gets angry too. The 31-year-old Javanese native is an investigator for the nonprofit group ProFauna, which lobbies on behalf of what she believes is Indonesia's most precious resource: its indigenous wildlife.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | Shannon Dininny, Associated Press
HANFORD REACH NATIONAL MONUMENT, Wash. -- When wildfires raced through tinder-dry grass and sagebrush on the Hanford Reach National Monument this summer, much of the worry centered on whether flames would reach radioactive waste at the neighboring Hanford nuclear reservation. Now wildlife officials are taking stock of the devastation to the charred monument itself, which stretches along a free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River known for salmon runs, bird habitat and rare plant life. "The No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2004 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Pesticides are jeopardizing several hundred endangered species throughout the country -- including California frogs and fish -- and federal officials are failing to protect them when they approve the chemicals for use, according to a report to be released today by an environmental group. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in three months, a cadre of golden eagles on Santa Cruz Island has outfoxed a helicopter crew trying to capture them, leaving frustrated wildlife managers to fall back on more traditional trapping methods. The helicopter, aided by 20 spotters on the ground, spent the week chasing the powerful birds across steep ridges, into canyons and along sheer sea cliffs. But whenever the helicopter closed in, the eagles slipped away, ducking for cover beneath trees and ledges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two environmental groups have sued the city of Santa Clarita over a plan to build an auto mall near a bank of the Santa Clara River, saying that the project would harm endangered wildlife and increase pollution. The suit filed on Friday by the Center for Biological Diversity and the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment contends that the plan violates the California Environmental Quality Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2002 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed $1-million water park expansion at Lake Casitas could endanger wildlife and contribute to traffic congestion at the popular reservoir near Ojai, environmentalists said Thursday. The Casitas Municipal Water District wants to build a waterway, called Lazy River, near an existing one-acre children's water playground at the entrance to the lake, which is off-limits to swimmers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Environmental groups are taking the Justice Department to court over a policy that prohibits prosecuting individuals who kill endangered wildlife unless it can be proved that they knew they were targeting a protected animal. Critics charge that the 15-year-old McKittrick policy provides a loophole that has prevented criminal prosecution of dozens of individuals who killed grizzly bears, highly endangered California condors and whooping cranes as well as 48 federally protected Mexican wolves.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Volodya, a barrel-chested forester, uncorked a bottle of brandy with his teeth, gulped a glass with his meat-and-potato stew and warmed to a favorite topic: hunting for wild boar. Although his usual job is to protect the wildlife on one of the best-known nature preserves in the Soviet Union, boars are considered a menace, to be killed on sight.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | Associated Press
The American lynx will be protected as an endangered species by the Interior Department, an environmental group said. Defenders of Wildlife said Wednesday that a settlement reached with the Justice Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will propose listing the lynx as endangered within the contiguous 48 states by June 30. A final listing decision is not due until June 1999.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | PAUL AMES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A walk into the dusty customs warehouse, back behind the piles of contraband Oriental rugs and stacks of smuggled Yugoslav vodka, brought a sight to break an animal-lover's heart. There were heaps of confiscated skins from snow leopards and tigers, orangutan skulls, stuffed tropical birds, the remains of dozens of other creatures--grisly evidence of the lucrative world trade in endangered wildlife.
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