Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEndeavors
IN THE NEWS

Endeavors

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Longtime Northridge resident Zeppo Marx was the youngest and undoubtedly the least memorable of the four acting Marx Brothers. While Groucho, Harpo and Chico delighted moviegoers with their slapstick antics, Zeppo was generally assigned bland romantic roles. On screen, he "got the girl," but off screen Zeppo disliked the sidekick role and in 1933, after appearing in the team's first five films, he gave up life in front of the camera.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 7, 2008 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
A trio of partners representing some of the best-known comedy actors and filmmakers in Hollywood jumped from United Talent Agency to Endeavor over the weekend in one of the biggest shake-ups to jolt the agency world in recent years.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | Compiled by Jack Searles
Siemens Solar Industries, based in Camarillo, has won an award given annually by a state agency to recognize outstanding waste-reduction efforts by California businesses. The California Integrated Waste Management Board presented Siemens with its Waste Reduction Award, citing the company's efforts in waste prevention, recycling and procurement of recycled products. The agency encourages firms to reduce waste and the amount of material sent to landfills.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | From the Washington Post
With government-bashing a popular sport, now comes a report from the Brookings Institution on the federal government's 50 most important achievements of the last 50 years. The greatest achievement, according to the Brookings report, was the rebuilding of Europe after World War II. Expanding voting rights was No. 2, while promoting equal access to public accommodations was No. 3 and reducing workplace discrimination was No. 5.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2007 | Rick Wartzman
More than two years ago, after the first privately funded manned rocket soared into space to claim a $10-million prize, the man behind the contest brimmed with jubilation, a profound sense of relief and visions of the next frontier to conquer. "I'm going to the stars," he said at the time. But, in fact, Peter Diamandis has moved on to something that, in many respects, is even more momentous.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My child bride has the hots for another man. You know the type: half French, half Italian, a hip little Romeo about half my age with enough Euro-charm to turn an average guy like me into some dweeby L.A. loser, a stoop-shouldered Quasimodo. This guy's a skater. But it seems I'm the one who keeps slipping up. Let me explain. My girlfriend (OK, OK, so she's not really my child bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990 | JOHN GLORE, Glore is literary manager of South Coast Repertory Theatre in Costa Mesa, where Shaw's "Man and Superman" plays through Oct. 11, and runs 3 1/4 hours. and
In his review of George Bernard Shaw's "Man and Superman" at South Coast Repertory, Don Shirley takes exception to the way in which the play has been edited. In doing so, he attributes SCR's playing version of the text to Amlin Gray, a mistake which must be corrected at the outset.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
A foreign secret agent stationed in New York was assigned to "get the dirt" on a senior State Department official. His aim was to force the U.S. official to quit trying to curb espionage activities in the United States--British espionage activities. A scientist in the super-secret U.S. National Security Agency was convicted of passing secret documents--to the Dutch. And a special section for collecting intelligence on U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1995 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Print the legend" went the maxim that John Ford memorialized. Perhaps literally taking off from that famous advice, "Legend," a cheeky new Western series from UPN, starts off by making some hay of Old West cliches and then, with a wink, quickly embraces them. As a shoot-'em-up celebration of falsehoods, the show may be too cynical for young kids, and isn't nearly cynical enough for grown-ups.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|